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** In some ''Warhammer'' material, ''Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay'' especially, halflings are resistant to Chaos warping or immune to mutation. They are also presented as voracious omnivores who are not above [[ImAHumanitarian eating you out of house and home]]. And they may be of the same stock as [[OurOgresAreHungrier Ogres]], who are tougher, hungrier, and much bigger. Specifically, the Old Ones, whose intervention created the "good" races of the Warhammer World at the dawn of history, seem to have created Ogres and Halflings last of all their children, in a rush thanks to the impending collapse of the world under the Chaos incursions. Unlike Elves, Dwarfs and Humans though, they are rushed and incomplete races -- crude and brutish on the one hand, docile and defenseless on the other (more or less). They are both, however, resistant to both magic and corruption, which is perhaps why they were made in the first place -- to resist the encroachment of Chaos. The ogres even seem to have a subconscious awareness that they are supposed to work with the halflings, but since the two live in vastly different areas, they've adopted a breed of goblin known as "gnoblars" to fill the void (and occasionally their stomachs).

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** In some ''Warhammer'' material, ''Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay'' ''TabletopGame/WarhammerFantasyRoleplay'' especially, halflings are resistant to Chaos warping or immune to mutation. They are also presented as voracious omnivores who are not above [[ImAHumanitarian eating you out of house and home]]. And they may be of the same stock as [[OurOgresAreHungrier Ogres]], who are tougher, hungrier, and much bigger. Specifically, the Old Ones, whose intervention created the "good" races of the Warhammer World at the dawn of history, seem to have created Ogres and Halflings last of all their children, in a rush thanks to the impending collapse of the world under the Chaos incursions. Unlike Elves, Dwarfs and Humans though, they are rushed and incomplete races -- crude and brutish on the one hand, docile and defenseless on the other (more or less). They are both, however, resistant to both magic and corruption, which is perhaps why they were made in the first place -- to resist the encroachment of Chaos. The ogres even seem to have a subconscious awareness that they are supposed to work with the halflings, but since the two live in vastly different areas, they've adopted a breed of goblin known as "gnoblars" to fill the void (and occasionally their stomachs).


'''Hobbits''' are a subtrope of the LittlePeople popularized by [[Creator/JRRTolkien J.R.R.Tolkien]] and now frequently found in a StandardFantasySetting. While ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' has defined the modern interpretation of [[FiveRaces most of the races]] in fantasy fiction, hobbits are unique in the sense that they were nearly completely Tolkien's own creation. They were adopted to other fantasy worlds via the general influence of Tolkien's works on the StandardFantasySetting and particularly via ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'', which called them '''Halflings'''.[[note]] After being sued by the Tolkien Enterprises for calling them hobbits - see more below[[/note]]. Their oddly specific traits tend to include very high magic resistance, good luck, ability to move about unnoticed (though not invisible) and good sling, slingshot and rock throwing abilities. Tolkien's original Hobbits were known for their tough, furry feet, which led to them [[DoesNotLikeShoes not requiring or enjoying footwear]] - this is not necessarily carried over to later versions.

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'''Hobbits''' are a subtrope of the LittlePeople popularized by [[Creator/JRRTolkien J.R.R.Tolkien]] and now frequently found in a StandardFantasySetting. While ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' has defined the modern interpretation of [[FiveRaces [[StandardFantasyRaces most of the races]] in fantasy fiction, hobbits are unique in the sense that they were nearly completely Tolkien's own creation. They were adopted to other fantasy worlds via the general influence of Tolkien's works on the StandardFantasySetting and particularly via ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'', which called them '''Halflings'''.[[note]] After being sued by the Tolkien Enterprises for calling them hobbits - -- see more below[[/note]]. Their oddly specific traits tend to include very high magic resistance, good luck, ability to move about unnoticed (though not invisible) and good sling, slingshot and rock throwing abilities. Tolkien's original Hobbits were known for their tough, furry feet, which led to them [[DoesNotLikeShoes not requiring or enjoying footwear]] - -- this is not necessarily carried over to later versions.


* ''TabletopGame/TheDarkEye'': The hill dwarves are hobbits in everything but name. They have long since abandoned the traditional dwarven lifestyles of warfare and hardship, instead settling rolling hill-lands where they live in round earth houses. They pointedly avoid combat and adventure, which they view as extremely unpleasant, prefer to lead lives of gregariousness and pleasure, and are very fond of fine food and drink.



** Halflings in ''TabletopGame/{{Ravenloft}}'' tend to follow the Tolkien model of settled stay-at-homes, as they're the most tolerated demihumans in the Land of Mists and prefer not to rock the boat. Plus, y'know, it's ''Ravenloft'', so unless you're a Vistani, living like a gypsy is bound to get you eaten by something out there on the roads at night.
** ''TabletopGame/{{Birthright}}'' had its own twist on Halflings, they were refugees from the World of Shadow, a Mirror World inhabited by the dead and TheFairFolk (of which they were a subrace).

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** ''TabletopGame/{{Ravenloft}}'': Halflings in ''TabletopGame/{{Ravenloft}}'' tend to follow the Tolkien model of settled stay-at-homes, as they're the most tolerated demihumans in the Land of Mists and prefer not to rock the boat. Plus, y'know, it's ''Ravenloft'', so unless you're a Vistani, living like a gypsy is bound to get you eaten by something out there on the roads at night.
** ''TabletopGame/{{Birthright}}'' had its own twist on Halflings, Halflings: they were refugees from the World of Shadow, a Mirror World mirror world inhabited by the dead and TheFairFolk (of which they were a subrace).



* The ''TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}}'' campaign world "Obsidian Twilight" has halflings who are essentially garbage-dwelling [[{{Film/CHUD}} CHUDs]]. For some reason. The game also has a more vanilla variety as one of the "core" races of the game. Pathfinder Halflings tend to be cheerful opportunists who prefer to avoid the limelight (and the problems that come with it). In many Human nations, halflings are prized as servants and, in less enlightened kingdoms, slaves.
** Pathfinder's Second Edition has the Shoonies, who are less human-looking than the usual hobbits (they're anthropomorphic pugs) but otherwise fit the trope very well, being small, peace-loving people who live in idyllic farming villages and enjoy the simple pleasures of life.
* ''[[TabletopGame/{{Warhammer}} Warhammer Fantasy]]'' :

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* ''TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}}'':
** Halflings are one of the game's core playable races. ''Pathfinder'' halflings tend to be cheerful opportunists who prefer to avoid the limelight (and the problems that come with it). In many human nations, halflings are prized as servants and, in less enlightened kingdoms, slaves.
**
The ''TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}}'' campaign world "Obsidian Twilight" campaign worlds has halflings who are essentially garbage-dwelling [[{{Film/CHUD}} CHUDs]].Film/{{CHUD}}s. For some reason. The game also has a more vanilla variety as one of the "core" races of the game. Pathfinder Halflings tend to be cheerful opportunists who prefer to avoid the limelight (and the problems that come with it). In many Human nations, halflings are prized as servants and, in less enlightened kingdoms, slaves.\n
** Pathfinder's Second Edition has the Shoonies, who are less human-looking than the usual hobbits (they're anthropomorphic pugs) but otherwise fit the trope very well, being small, peace-loving people who live in idyllic farming villages and enjoy the simple pleasures of life.
* ''[[TabletopGame/{{Warhammer}} Warhammer Fantasy]]'' :''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer}}'':

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** Pathfinder's Second Edition has the Shoonies, who are less human-looking than the usual hobbits (they're anthropomorphic pugs) but otherwise fit the trope very well, being small, peace-loving people who live in idyllic farming villages and enjoy the simple pleasures of life.


** In 2nd edition, monster lore for the brownie, characterized in D&D as [a small, helpful fairy race that covertly lives alongside and assists humanoids, postulated that halflings may be either a subrace of brownie who have become more mortal-like, or a HalfHumanHybrid of brownie stock.

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** In 2nd edition, monster lore for the brownie, characterized in D&D as [a a small, helpful fairy race that covertly lives alongside and assists humanoids, postulated that halflings may be either a subrace of brownie who have become more mortal-like, or a HalfHumanHybrid of brownie stock.


** In 2nd edition, monster lore for the brownie, characterized in D&D as [[HouseFairy a small, helpful fairy race that covertly lives alongside and assists humanoids]], postulated that halflings may be either a subrace of brownie who have become more mortal-like, or a HalfHumanHybrid of brownie stock.

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** In 2nd edition, monster lore for the brownie, characterized in D&D as [[HouseFairy a [a small, helpful fairy race that covertly lives alongside and assists humanoids]], humanoids, postulated that halflings may be either a subrace of brownie who have become more mortal-like, or a HalfHumanHybrid of brownie stock.


* ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homo_floresiensis Homo floresiensis]]'' have been nicknamed "hobbits", and were often barely over 3ft 7inches. It has been debated whether they were just Homo Sapiens which had undergone insular dwarfism, but with further evidence they do seem to be a separate species of hominid.

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* ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homo_floresiensis Homo floresiensis]]'' have been nicknamed "hobbits", and were often barely over 3ft 7inches. It has been debated whether they were just Homo Sapiens ''Homo sapiens'' which had undergone insular dwarfism, but with further evidence they do seem to be a separate species of hominid.hominid. Evidently they and modern humans did coexist on the island for thousands of years without much evidence of conflict, and oral tradition very likely based folk memory of the extinct hobbits largely holds they were relatively inoffensive.

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* ''Literature/TheMarvellousLandOfSnergs'': The eponymous Snergs are round-faced, short and stout people. They also are good archers and love partying and building eccentric architecture.


** In 2nd edition, monster lore for the brownie, characterized in D&D as [[HouseFairy a small, helpful fairy race that covertly lives alongside and assists humanoids]], postulated that halflings may be either a subrace of brownie who have become more mortal-like, or a HalfHumanHybrid of brownie stock.



*** After the world was almost destroyed by Chaos, a new type of Kender emerged, the "damaged" Kender. Not actually a new race, they were instead Kenders who reacted to the horrors of the Chaos War by effectively becoming psychologically mature, losing their immunity to fear and their race's innocent kleptomaniac nature. In-universe [[OOCIsSeriousBusiness they tended to freak everyone out]].

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*** After the world was almost destroyed by Chaos, a new type of Kender emerged, the "damaged" "Afflicted" Kender. Not actually a new race, they were instead Kenders who reacted to the horrors of the Chaos War by effectively becoming psychologically mature, losing their immunity to fear and their race's innocent kleptomaniac nature. In-universe [[OOCIsSeriousBusiness they tended to freak everyone out]].


** Starting with Third Edition, halflings got a major overhaul and became much less Tolkienesque; in the process becoming more adventurous and less innocent; the default subrace became the ''lightfoots'', who were portrayed not as jovial homebodies but tricksy nomads. Over time they have physically become "sexier" and less hobbitlike, to the point that some now see them as [[OurElvesAreBetter short elves]]. The "cuter", more provincial traits of the "old" halflings were mostly given to the [[OurGnomesAreWeirder gnomes]], who were described as living in cozy burrow-towns.

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** Starting with Third Edition, halflings got a major overhaul and became much less Tolkienesque; in the process becoming more adventurous and less innocent; the default subrace became the ''lightfoots'', who were portrayed not as jovial homebodies but tricksy nomads. Over time they have physically become "sexier" and less hobbitlike, to the point that some now see them as [[OurElvesAreBetter [[OurElvesAreDifferent short elves]]. The "cuter", more provincial traits of the "old" halflings were mostly given to the [[OurGnomesAreWeirder gnomes]], who were described as living in cozy burrow-towns.


Nevertheless, the term hobbit is trademarked. It is common for non-Tolkien works to come up with a [[WritingAroundTrademarks different name]] for their hobbit-like race because the holders of the trademark, "Middle-earth Enterprises" (formerly "Tolkien Enterprises" and actually a division of The Saul Zaentz Company, who bought certain rights in 1976) are notoriously litigious about them[[note]]The story of the legal situation of the word "hobbit" and Tolkien gaming is too long to go into here. The short, relevant version is that Zaentz' company owned the rights to merchandise based on Tolkien's works, . After the original edition of ''Dungeons & Dragons'' (or OD&D) used "hobbit", Zaentz pursued legal action at least partly to create a legal precedent that games fell under his purview, despite being "printed, literary material" which in theory fell under the Estate's purview. This was one of many things that led to protracted legal conflict with Christopher Tolkien and the literary estate for the next thirty years. Middle-earth Enterprises came in for particular criticism in 2011, when they tried to sue a British pub for being called The Hobbit.[[/note]]. Halfling serves as the copyright-free default.

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Nevertheless, the term hobbit is trademarked. It is common for non-Tolkien works to come up with a [[WritingAroundTrademarks different name]] for their hobbit-like race because the holders of the trademark, "Middle-earth Enterprises" (formerly "Tolkien Enterprises" and actually a division of The Saul Zaentz Company, who bought certain rights in 1976) are notoriously litigious about them[[note]]The story of the legal situation of the word "hobbit" and Tolkien gaming is too long to go into here. The short, relevant version is that Zaentz' company owned the rights to merchandise based on Tolkien's works, . works. After the original edition of ''Dungeons & Dragons'' (or OD&D) used "hobbit", Zaentz pursued legal action at least action, partly to create a legal precedent that games fell under his purview, despite being "printed, literary material". "Printed literary material" which in theory fell under the Tolkien Estate's purview. This was one of many things that led to protracted legal conflict with Christopher Tolkien and the literary estate for the next thirty years. Middle-earth Enterprises came in for particular criticism in 2011, when they tried to sue a British pub for being called The Hobbit.[[/note]]. Halfling serves as the copyright-free default.


Nevertheless, the term hobbit is trademarked. It is common for non-Tolkien works to come up with a [[WritingAroundTrademarks different name]] for their hobbit-like race because the holders of the trademark, "Middle-earth Enterprises" (formerly "Tolkien Enterprises" and actually a division of The Saul Zaentz Company, who bought certain rights in 1976) are notoriously litigious[[note]]They've even been in legal conflict with Christopher Tolkien and the literary estate[[/note]]. They came in for particular criticism in 2011, when they tried to sue a British pub and cafe for being called The Hobbit! Halfling serves as the copyright-free default.

to:

Nevertheless, the term hobbit is trademarked. It is common for non-Tolkien works to come up with a [[WritingAroundTrademarks different name]] for their hobbit-like race because the holders of the trademark, "Middle-earth Enterprises" (formerly "Tolkien Enterprises" and actually a division of The Saul Zaentz Company, who bought certain rights in 1976) are notoriously litigious[[note]]They've even been litigious about them[[note]]The story of the legal situation of the word "hobbit" and Tolkien gaming is too long to go into here. The short, relevant version is that Zaentz' company owned the rights to merchandise based on Tolkien's works, . After the original edition of ''Dungeons & Dragons'' (or OD&D) used "hobbit", Zaentz pursued legal action at least partly to create a legal precedent that games fell under his purview, despite being "printed, literary material" which in theory fell under the Estate's purview. This was one of many things that led to protracted legal conflict with Christopher Tolkien and the literary estate[[/note]]. They estate for the next thirty years. Middle-earth Enterprises came in for particular criticism in 2011, when they tried to sue a British pub and cafe for being called The Hobbit! Hobbit.[[/note]]. Halfling serves as the copyright-free default.


[[folder:Live Action Television]]

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[[folder:Live Action [[folder:Live-Action Television]]


'''Hobbits''' are a subtrope of the LittlePeople popularized by [[Creator/JRRTolkien J.R.R.Tolkien]] and now frequently found in a StandardFantasySetting. While ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' has defined the modern interpretation of [[FiveRaces most of the races]] in fantasy fiction, hobbits are unique in the sense that they were nearly completely Tolkien's own creation. They were adopted to other fantasy worlds via the general influence of Tolkien's works on the StandardFantasySetting and particularly via ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'', which called them '''Halflings'''.[[note]] After being sued by the Tolkien estate for calling them hobbits.[[/note]]. Their oddly specific traits tend to include very high magic resistance, good luck, ability to move about unnoticed (though not invisible) and good sling, slingshot and rock throwing abilities. Tolkien's original Hobbits were known for their tough, furry feet, which led to them [[DoesNotLikeShoes not requiring or enjoying footwear]] - this is not necessarily carried over to later versions.

to:

'''Hobbits''' are a subtrope of the LittlePeople popularized by [[Creator/JRRTolkien J.R.R.Tolkien]] and now frequently found in a StandardFantasySetting. While ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' has defined the modern interpretation of [[FiveRaces most of the races]] in fantasy fiction, hobbits are unique in the sense that they were nearly completely Tolkien's own creation. They were adopted to other fantasy worlds via the general influence of Tolkien's works on the StandardFantasySetting and particularly via ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'', which called them '''Halflings'''.[[note]] After being sued by the Tolkien estate Enterprises for calling them hobbits.[[/note]].hobbits - see more below[[/note]]. Their oddly specific traits tend to include very high magic resistance, good luck, ability to move about unnoticed (though not invisible) and good sling, slingshot and rock throwing abilities. Tolkien's original Hobbits were known for their tough, furry feet, which led to them [[DoesNotLikeShoes not requiring or enjoying footwear]] - this is not necessarily carried over to later versions.


Nevertheless, the term hobbit is trademarked. It is common for non-Tolkien works to come up with a [[WritingAroundTrademarks different name]] for their hobbit-like race, as the Tolkien estate, and even more so the owners of the film rights, are notoriously litigious. Halfling serves as the copyright-free default.

to:

Nevertheless, the term hobbit is trademarked. It is common for non-Tolkien works to come up with a [[WritingAroundTrademarks different name]] for their hobbit-like race, as race because the Tolkien estate, and even more so the owners holders of the film rights, trademark, "Middle-earth Enterprises" (formerly "Tolkien Enterprises" and actually a division of The Saul Zaentz Company, who bought certain rights in 1976) are notoriously litigious. litigious[[note]]They've even been in legal conflict with Christopher Tolkien and the literary estate[[/note]]. They came in for particular criticism in 2011, when they tried to sue a British pub and cafe for being called The Hobbit! Halfling serves as the copyright-free default.



They are usually a small, "innocent" version of people who only want to enjoy life without big plans or complications.
Hobbits also tend to be small -- 3'6" on average. This possibly [[KidAppealCharacter makes younger audiences easily identify with them]]. It is an easy way to make them seem less threatening to other characters. Jerks will get frustrated with them. If your cast is otherwise filled with fantastic and lordly people, you know people who treat them nicely [[PetTheDog are good at heart]]. When they're thrown into the world suddenly, they have to survive on their wits and luck and may find out [[YouAreBetterThanYouThinkYouAre they have qualities they were unaware of]]. They occasionally are the ones to get the GoldenSnitch. At the beginning of a given story, a hobbit character will usually also be naive, unworldly, and illustrate the difference between wisdom and intelligence; they usually have a fair amount of the former, with none of the latter.

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They are usually a small, "innocent" version of people who only want to enjoy life without big plans or complications. \n Hobbits also tend to be small -- 3'6" on average. This possibly [[KidAppealCharacter makes younger audiences easily identify with them]]. It is an easy way to make them seem less threatening to other characters. Jerks will get frustrated with them. If your cast is otherwise filled with fantastic and lordly people, you know people who treat them nicely [[PetTheDog are good at heart]]. When they're thrown into the world suddenly, they have to survive on their wits and luck and may find out [[YouAreBetterThanYouThinkYouAre they have qualities they were unaware of]]. They occasionally are the ones to get the GoldenSnitch. At the beginning of a given story, a hobbit character will usually also be naive, unworldly, and illustrate the difference between wisdom and intelligence; they usually have a fair amount of the former, with none of the latter.

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