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** There are also two insert songs sung entirely in German: "Vogel im Käfig" (''caged bird'') and "Bauklötze" (''building blocks''). It's worth noting that the soundtrack was composed by Sawano Hiroyuki, the same man behind Guilty Crown's "Bios". He pretty clearly has a fondness for this trope.

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** There are also two insert songs sung entirely in German: "Vogel im Käfig" (''caged bird'') and "Bauklötze" (''building blocks''). It's worth noting that the soundtrack was composed by Sawano Hiroyuki, Music/HiroyukiSawano, the same man behind Guilty Crown's "Bios". He pretty clearly has a fondness for this trope.



* ''Anime/KillLaKill'', yet another soundtrack composed by Sawano Hiroyuki, has [[BigBad Ragyo's]] {{Leitmotif}} "Blumenkranz" (floral wreath). The pronunciation hasn't improved, though the lyrics are near-perfect.

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* ''Anime/KillLaKill'', yet another soundtrack composed by Sawano Hiroyuki, Music/HiroyukiSawano, has [[BigBad Ragyo's]] {{Leitmotif}} "Blumenkranz" (floral wreath). The pronunciation hasn't improved, though the lyrics are near-perfect.


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* ''VideoGame/XenobladeChroniclesX'': With its soundtrack being composed by Music/HiroyukiSawano, this was inevitable. ''Wir fliegen'' (We fly) is probably the most notable example.


* Naturally a lot of WarTimeCartoon shorts will features some random German gibberish or words, most notably in ''WesternAnimation/HerrMeetsHare'', ''WesternAnimation/PlaneDaffy'', ''WesternAnimation/DaffyTheCommando'', ''WesternAnimation/BlitzWolf'', ''WesternAnimation/RussianRhapsody'' and ''Disney/DerFuehrersFace''. An interesting exception is ''WesternAnimation/EducationForDeath'' in which all the German is spoken by actual German voice actors and thus grammatically correct.

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* Naturally a lot of WarTimeCartoon shorts will features some random German gibberish or words, most notably in ''WesternAnimation/HerrMeetsHare'', ''WesternAnimation/PlaneDaffy'', ''WesternAnimation/DaffyTheCommando'', ''WesternAnimation/BlitzWolf'', ''WesternAnimation/RussianRhapsody'' "WesternAnimation/HerrMeetsHare", "WesternAnimation/PlaneDaffy", "WesternAnimation/DaffyTheCommando", "WesternAnimation/BlitzWolf", "WesternAnimation/RussianRhapsody" and ''Disney/DerFuehrersFace''. "WesternAnimation/DerFuehrersFace". An interesting exception is ''WesternAnimation/EducationForDeath'' "WesternAnimation/EducationForDeath" in which all the German is spoken by actual German voice actors and thus grammatically correct.

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* Two of the people aboard the ''Demeter'' in Episode 2 of ''Series/Dracula2020'' are of German descent (the helmsman and an elderly Grand Duchess, both allegedly from Bavaria). Dracula feeds on the former to have a brief but inconsequential conversation in perfect German with the latter.


* The ''VideoGame/SaGaFrontier2 OST'' is the soundtrack from the video game. Released in Japan, the album's printed paper inserts expect a native Japanese reader, but nearly ''all'' the track names are in German for no obvious reason. (A handful are [[GratuitousFrench in French]].) Though, in fairness, the composer Masashi Hamauzu is a Japanese national who was born in UsefulNotes/{{Munich}}, Germany.

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* The ''VideoGame/SaGaFrontier2 OST'' is the soundtrack from the video game. Released in Japan, the album's printed paper inserts expect a native Japanese reader, but nearly ''all'' the track names are in German for no obvious reason. (A handful are [[GratuitousFrench in French]].) Though, in fairness, the game's composer Masashi Hamauzu Creator/MasashiHamauzu is a Japanese national who was born in UsefulNotes/{{Munich}}, Germany.


** In ''Anime/MobileSuitGundamIronBloodedOrphans'', Gjallarhorn has four mobile suits with German names, namely the [[SuperPrototype Schwalbe Graze]] (Swallow Graze), Graze Ritter (Graze Knight), Graze Stachel (Graze Spike) and Graze Ein (Graze One). However, unlike the first three, Graze Ein is prototype weapon named after the pilot [[spoiler:who has [[ManInTheMachine become the mobile suit]]]], rather being a conventional Graze variant.

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** In ''Anime/MobileSuitGundamIronBloodedOrphans'', Gjallarhorn has four mobile suits with German names, namely the [[SuperPrototype Schwalbe Graze]] (Swallow Graze), Graze Ritter (Graze Knight), Graze Stachel (Graze Spike) and Graze Ein (Graze One). However, unlike the first three, Graze Ein is a prototype weapon named after the pilot [[spoiler:who [[spoiler:Ein Dalton, who has [[ManInTheMachine become a part of the mobile suit]]]], rather than being a conventional Graze variant.variant with a German name by default.


** In ''Anime/MobileSuitGundamIronBloodedOrphans'', Gjallarhorn has two mobile suits with German names, namely the [[SuperPrototype Schwalbe Graze]] (Swallow Graze) and Graze Stachel (Graze Spike).

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** In ''Anime/MobileSuitGundamIronBloodedOrphans'', Gjallarhorn has two four mobile suits with German names, namely the [[SuperPrototype Schwalbe Graze]] (Swallow Graze) and Graze), Graze Ritter (Graze Knight), Graze Stachel (Graze Spike).Spike) and Graze Ein (Graze One). However, unlike the first three, Graze Ein is prototype weapon named after the pilot [[spoiler:who has [[ManInTheMachine become the mobile suit]]]], rather being a conventional Graze variant.

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Due to being a closely related language, sometimes GratuitousGerman will be used where gratuitous Dutch is intended.


* German is used at times in stressful situations and others in ''Film/TheMatrix'' fanfic ''Fanfic/BringingMeToLife''. Justified for one character Max, as in one chapter it's revealed that Max's Grandmom was from Germany and taught him.

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* German is used at times in stressful situations and others in ''Film/TheMatrix'' fanfic ''Fanfic/BringingMeToLife''.''Bringing Me To Life''. Justified for one character Max, as in one chapter it's revealed that Max's Grandmom was from Germany and taught him.



--->“Ich zerreiße Ihren Gott verdammten Kopf weg!” Asuka cried out in German while trying to get at Shinji.

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--->“Ich --->"Ich zerreiße Ihren Gott verdammten Kopf weg!” weg!" Asuka cried out in German while trying to get at Shinji.



--->“Gott in himmel!”

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--->“Gott --->"Gott in himmel!”himmel!"



* In the ''{{Franchise/Danganronpa}}'' fan comic ''Fanfic/DreadnoughtDespair'', the SHSL Opera Tenor Siegfried Iskandar tends to drop a few German words in his sentences.

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* In the ''{{Franchise/Danganronpa}}'' ''Franchise/{{Danganronpa}}'' fan comic ''Fanfic/DreadnoughtDespair'', the SHSL Opera Tenor Siegfried Iskandar tends to drop a few German words in his sentences.





!!!'''Im Allgemeinen:'''
* Used regularly by comedians for ThoseWackyNazis implications: even ''[[Series/TheDailyShow Jon Stewart]]'' is a regular offender. Of course in the complete package, with ze dialect, angry and even (or especially) as German native unintelligible pronunciation and of course scrambled grammar.
!!!'''Serien:'''
* ''Series/TwentyFour'': Jack Bauer pretends to be German in one episode and speaks it. When he is told he has an American accent, he explains he lived in America for years. Oddly, he is addressed as "du" instead of the more appropriate "Sie".
* ''Series/ThirtyRock'': Liz Lemon can speak German, just not all that well. We see her use it a few times, most notably when she accidentally sells NBC to a German cable TV company after confusing "verkaufen" with "kaufen" ("sell" and "buy" respectively).



* ''Series/DoctorWho'': [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E13JourneysEnd "Journey's End"]] shows that Japan doesn't have the monopoly on Gratuitous German: [[AC:"Exterminieren! Exterminieren!"]] Especially grating since "exterminieren" is not even a proper word (at least not one anyone actually uses), just the usual [[AC:"Exterminate!"]] with a common verb ending. More accurate alternative would be [[AC:"Eliminieren!"]] (which was used by the actual German dub), or [[AC:"Vernichten!"]], which, while being closer to "destroy" or "annihilate", was what the... [[ANaziByAnyOtherName main inspiration for the Daleks]] used in a similar context.
* ''Series/{{Frasier}}'' played with this a few times throughout its run, most notably in the episode 'An Affair to Forget', where, after one of Frasier's listeners calls into his psychiatric-advice program thinking her Bavarian, fencing-coach husband was having an affair, Frasier begins to think (with good reason) that his sister-in-law is the 'other woman', leading to quite a bit of German; including a scene where [[HilarityEnsues the characters must translate from English to Spanish to German, then back again]].
** As Frasier is a [[AllPsychologyIsFreudian Freudian]], and Freud having been a German-speaker from present-day Austria, German psychological terms randomly pop up now and again.
** Frasier is even enraptured with a new love interest when, among other interests, she admits to speaking German and liking the German war film ''Film/DasBoot''.
* ''Series/{{Fringe}}'' has quite a few examples. E. g., there's "Wissenschaft Prison Germany". What exactly is a "science prison" supposed to be?
** Apart from that, writing "Wissenschaft Prison" as it is, is the German equivalent for what "Sciencegefängnis" is for English, complete with the (non)existent spaces between the words.
** Most of the background chatter on the airplane in the cold opener of the series pilot. Hilariously badly spoken/accented, too.
* ''Series/{{Grimm}}'''s monster names and related terms are all ''terrible'' German. They go from simple grammar fail (e.g.: using adjectives as nouns; wrongly cobbled-together compound words; e.g. werewolves are called blutbaden. In fact, "Blutbad", plural "Blutbäder", means "bloodbath" or "massacre''. 'blutbaden' itself looks like a verb infinitive, 'to bloodbath' (which doesn't exist)) to horrible dictionary slips (e.g. the supposed 'bee queen' is called "bee gay [person]") and mess-ups of cultural context of phrases that completely destroy the tone of a scene (e.g. the quote "Alles hat ein Ende nur die Wurst hat zwei." which comes from a very well known comedic BreakupSong from the late 1980s, but is used in the show as some kind of philosophical wisdom handed down the generations to say over a friend's dead body).



* The authors of ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'' seem to love German compound words...
** In the aptly named episode "The Yips", [[TheCameo Heidi Klum]] (who in RealLife is indeed a German native speaker) translates "yips" (the condition Barney has which renders him utterly incapable of flirting) with "Ach du meine Güte, gar nichts klappt mehr... [unintelligible]". The intelligible part means "Oh my goodness, nothing works anymore...", which is grammatically a whole sentence, although Heidi says it so fast that non-German speakers may be forgiven for assuming that it's one of those ridiculously long compound words.
** In the episode "Farhampton", Klaus (the German suitor of Ted's ex-girlfriend Victoria) teaches Ted the word "Lebenslangerschicksalsschatz", which he (correctly) translates as "lifelong treasure of destiny". Grammatically, this are actually two separate (compound-)words ("lebenslanger Schicksalsschatz"). Also, this is not actually a common expression in German, though "Schatz" (treasure) is indeed a common German term of endearment, just like "honey" is in English.
* ''Series/{{JAG}}'' has two examples of this trope. In "Nobody’s Child" [[CunningLinguist multilingual]] Sarah Mackenzie correctly translates the hymn title ''Als ich bei meinen Schafen wacht'' to ''As I watch over my sheep''. And in "A Tangled Webb (Part 2)" she speaks German with Mennonite settler in Paraguay.
* ''Series/{{MacGyver|1985}}'': Invoked and lampshaded whenever German is spoken; it's the one language [=MacGyver=] could never get the hang of. Sometimes PlayedForLaughs:
-->'''[=MacGyver=]:''' ''[translated, speaking to SecretPolice]'' We were picking apples in the forest. And this... ''[pointing to Jack]'' ...this is my ''wife!''
* In ''Series/MajimuriGakuen'', the AbsurdlyPowerfulStudentCouncil are inspired by the Nazis and its members have German words as nicknames.
* ''Series/MalcolmInTheMiddle'' has the original German couple Gretchen and Otto, which spoke a weird broken "Deutschlish". In Germany they became Danish.
* Dwight Schrute sings a couple of verses of John Denver's "Take Me Home, Country Roads" during an episode of ''Series/TheOfficeUS''.
--> ''Referring to copier instructions'': This is either an incense dispenser or a ceremonial sarcophagus. My German is [[UsefulNotes/{{Amish}} pre-industrial]], mostly religious.
* On ''Real Husbands of Hollywood'', Boris Kodjoe, playing a fictionalized version of himself, speaks German sometimes (one episode features his German ex-girlfriend trying to get back with him). Kodjoe is actually German thus he is fluent in German as well as English.
* ''Series/{{Sanctuary}}'': In the episode "Normandy" during the 1944 flashbacks Watson goes undercover as a German officer and has to bluff his way past a German roadblock. This turns into a discussion (in German) about his accent, as he pretends to be Bavarian to explain his mistakes and the soldier holding him up turns out to be from Bavaria as well. Both of the actors' pronunciation was mangled so badly that even Germans watching the original version needed subtitles, and, needless to say, neither sounded even remotely like he was from Bavaria.



* ''Series/DoctorWho'' shows that Japan doesn't have the monopoly on Gratuitous German: [[AC:"Exterminieren! Exterminieren!"]] Especially grating since "exterminieren" is not even a proper word (at least not one anyone actually uses), just the usual [[AC:"Exterminate!"]] with a common verb ending. More accurate alternative would be [[AC:"Eliminieren!"]] (which was used by the actual German dub), or [[AC:"Vernichten!"]], which, while being closer to "destroy" or "annihilate", was what the... [[ANaziByAnyOtherName main inspiration for the Daleks]] used in a similar context.
* Used regularly by comedians for ThoseWackyNazis implications: even ''[[Series/TheDailyShow Jon Stewart]]'' is a regular offender. Of course in the complete package, with ze dialect, angry and even (or especially) as German native unintelligible pronunciation and of course scrambled grammar.
* ''Series/MalcolmInTheMiddle'' has the original German couple Gretchen and Otto, which spoke a weird broken 'Deutschlish.' In Germany they became Danish.
* Dwight Schrute sings a couple of verses of John Denver's "Take Me Home, Country Roads" during an episode of ''Series/TheOfficeUS''.
--> ''Referring to copier instructions'': This is either an incense dispenser or a ceremonial sarcophagus. My German is [[UsefulNotes/{{Amish}} pre-industrial]], mostly religious.
* ''Series/ThirtyRock'': Liz Lemon can speak German, just not all that well. We see her use it a few times, most notably when she accidentally sells NBC to a German cable TV company after confusing "verkaufen" with "kaufen" ("sell" and "buy" respectively).
* ''Series/{{Fringe}}'' has quite a few examples. E. g., there's "Wissenschaft Prison Germany". What exactly is a "science prison" supposed to be?
*** Apart from that, writing "Wissenschaft Prison" as it is, is the German equivalent for what "Sciencegefängnis" is for English, complete with the (non)existent spaces between the words.
** Most of the background chatter on the airplane in the cold opener of the series pilot. Hilariously badly spoken/accented, too.
* [[Series/TwentyFour Jack Bauer]] pretends to be German in one episode and speaks it. When he is told he has an American accent, he explains he lived in America for years. Oddly, he is addressed as "du" instead of the more appropriate "Sie."
* ''Series/{{Frasier}}'' played with this a few times throughout its run, most notably in the episode 'An Affair to Forget', where, after one of Frasier's listeners calls into his psychiatric-advice program thinking her Bavarian, fencing-coach husband was having an affair, Frasier begins to think (with good reason) that his sister-in-law is the 'other woman', leading to quite a bit of German; including a scene where [[HilarityEnsues the characters must translate from English to Spanish to German, then back again]].
** As Frasier is a [[AllPsychologyIsFreudian Freudian]], and Freud having been a German-speaker from present-day Austria, German psychological terms randomly pop up now and again.
** Frasier is even enraptured with a new love interest when, among other interests, she admits to speaking German and liking the German war film ''Film/DasBoot''.
* ''Series/{{Grimm}}'''s monster names and related terms are all ''terrible'' German. They go from simple grammar fail (e.g.: using adjectives as nouns; wrongly cobbled-together compound words; e.g. werewolves are called blutbaden. In fact, "Blutbad", plural "Blutbäder", means "bloodbath" or "massacre''. 'blutbaden' itself looks like a verb infinitive, 'to bloodbath' (which doesn't exist)) to horrible dictionary slips (e.g. the supposed 'bee queen' is called "bee gay [person]") and mess-ups of cultural context of phrases that completely destroy the tone of a scene (e.g. the quote "Alles hat ein Ende nur die Wurst hat zwei." which comes from a very well known comedic BreakupSong from the late 1980s, but is used in the show as some kind of philosophical wisdom handed down the generations to say over a friend's dead body).
* ''Series/{{Sanctuary}}'': In the episode "Normandy" during the 1944 flashbacks Watson goes undercover as a German officer and has to bluff his way past a German roadblock. This turns into a discussion (in German) about his accent, as he pretends to be Bavarian to explain his mistakes and the soldier holding him up turns out to be from Bavaria as well. Both of the actors' pronunciation was mangled so badly that even Germans watching the original version needed subtitles, and, needless to say, neither sounded even remotely like he was from Bavaria.
* ''Series/StargateSG1'': In the episode "1969", Daniel Jackson pretends to be a German archaeologist and has a conversation consisting of PoirotSpeak English and surprisingly good German. Normally, this would be realistic when an American tries to con another American, but Daniel is supposed to be a genius linguist...

to:

* ''Series/DoctorWho'' shows that Japan doesn't have the monopoly on Gratuitous German: [[AC:"Exterminieren! Exterminieren!"]] Especially grating since "exterminieren" is not even a proper word (at least not one anyone actually uses), just the usual [[AC:"Exterminate!"]] with a common verb ending. More accurate alternative would be [[AC:"Eliminieren!"]] (which was used by the actual German dub), or [[AC:"Vernichten!"]], which, while being closer to "destroy" or "annihilate", was what the... [[ANaziByAnyOtherName main inspiration for the Daleks]] used in a similar context.
* Used regularly by comedians for ThoseWackyNazis implications: even ''[[Series/TheDailyShow Jon Stewart]]'' is a regular offender. Of course in the complete package, with ze dialect, angry and even (or especially) as German native unintelligible pronunciation and of course scrambled grammar.
* ''Series/MalcolmInTheMiddle'' has the original German couple Gretchen and Otto, which spoke a weird broken 'Deutschlish.' In Germany they became Danish.
* Dwight Schrute sings a couple of verses of John Denver's "Take Me Home, Country Roads" during an episode of ''Series/TheOfficeUS''.
--> ''Referring to copier instructions'': This is either an incense dispenser or a ceremonial sarcophagus. My German is [[UsefulNotes/{{Amish}} pre-industrial]], mostly religious.
* ''Series/ThirtyRock'': Liz Lemon can speak German, just not all that well. We see her use it a few times, most notably when she accidentally sells NBC to a German cable TV company after confusing "verkaufen" with "kaufen" ("sell" and "buy" respectively).
* ''Series/{{Fringe}}'' has quite a few examples. E. g., there's "Wissenschaft Prison Germany". What exactly is a "science prison" supposed to be?
*** Apart from that, writing "Wissenschaft Prison" as it is, is the German equivalent for what "Sciencegefängnis" is for English, complete with the (non)existent spaces between the words.
''Franchise/{{Stargate|Verse}}'':
** Most of the background chatter on the airplane in the cold opener of the series pilot. Hilariously badly spoken/accented, too.
* [[Series/TwentyFour Jack Bauer]] pretends to be German in one episode and speaks it. When he is told he has an American accent, he explains he lived in America for years. Oddly, he is addressed as "du" instead of the more appropriate "Sie."
* ''Series/{{Frasier}}'' played with this a few times throughout its run, most notably in the episode 'An Affair to Forget', where, after one of Frasier's listeners calls into his psychiatric-advice program thinking her Bavarian, fencing-coach husband was having an affair, Frasier begins to think (with good reason) that his sister-in-law is the 'other woman', leading to quite a bit of German; including a scene where [[HilarityEnsues the characters must translate from English to Spanish to German, then back again]].
** As Frasier is a [[AllPsychologyIsFreudian Freudian]], and Freud having been a German-speaker from present-day Austria, German psychological terms randomly pop up now and again.
** Frasier is even enraptured with a new love interest when, among other interests, she admits to speaking German and liking the German war film ''Film/DasBoot''.
* ''Series/{{Grimm}}'''s monster names and related terms are all ''terrible'' German. They go from simple grammar fail (e.g.: using adjectives as nouns; wrongly cobbled-together compound words; e.g. werewolves are called blutbaden. In fact, "Blutbad", plural "Blutbäder", means "bloodbath" or "massacre''. 'blutbaden' itself looks like a verb infinitive, 'to bloodbath' (which doesn't exist)) to horrible dictionary slips (e.g. the supposed 'bee queen' is called "bee gay [person]") and mess-ups of cultural context of phrases that completely destroy the tone of a scene (e.g. the quote "Alles hat ein Ende nur die Wurst hat zwei." which comes from a very well known comedic BreakupSong from the late 1980s, but is used in the show as some kind of philosophical wisdom handed down the generations to say over a friend's dead body).
* ''Series/{{Sanctuary}}'': In the episode "Normandy" during the 1944 flashbacks Watson goes undercover as a German officer and has to bluff his way past a German roadblock. This turns into a discussion (in German) about his accent, as he pretends to be Bavarian to explain his mistakes and the soldier holding him up turns out to be from Bavaria as well. Both of the actors' pronunciation was mangled so badly that even Germans watching the original version needed subtitles, and, needless to say, neither sounded even remotely like he was from Bavaria.
*
''Series/StargateSG1'': In the episode "1969", Daniel Jackson pretends to be a German archaeologist and has a conversation consisting of PoirotSpeak English and surprisingly good German. Normally, this would be realistic when an American tries to con another American, but Daniel is supposed to be a genius linguist...linguist...
** There's an episode of ''Series/StargateAtlantis'' in which a random extra playing a scientist makes some comments in German, like "this reminds me of the birth of my nephew" (about an alien wetware tech space shuttle they were dissecting). Unusually, the grammar and pronunciation of these lines is ''perfect''. It turns out, the extra was actually a German ex-pat normally working in the make-up crew of the show, and the lines were [[ThrowItIn ad-libbed]].
* Any episode of ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' featuring the Thule society is sure to include several instances of this.
* Creator/VanKootenEnDeBie: Mr. O. den Beste who is a former German language teacher and thus often uses untranslated German expressions and sayings in his vocabulary.
* In an episode of ''Series/{{Voyagers}}'' Bogg pretends to be a German boxer who volunteers to spar with Joe Louis prior to Louis's match with Max Schmeling in 1938. Jeff calls him to come over by saying ''kommen sie''. Later Jeff encourages Bogg in the ring by saying ''fighten sie!''
* In the second season of ''Series/WynonnaEarp'', the Iron Witch (who looks like she's Latina or Native American) inexplicably chants her old family magic in German. We only hear parts of it, but what can be understood is grammatically wrong or clearly too-literally translated from English.



* ''Series/{{JAG}}'' has two examples of this trope. In "Nobody’s Child" [[CunningLinguist multilingual]] Sarah Mackenzie correctly translates the hymn title ''Als ich bei meinen Schafen wacht'' to ''As I watch over my sheep''. And in "A Tangled Webb (Part 2)" she speaks German with Mennonite settler in Paraguay.
* The authors of ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'' seem to love German compound words...
** In the aptly named episode "The Yips", [[TheCameo Heidi Klum]] (who in RealLife is indeed a German native speaker) translates "yips" (the condition Barney has which renders him utterly incapable of flirting) with "Ach du meine Güte, gar nichts klappt mehr... [unintelligible]". The intelligible part means "Oh my goodness, nothing works anymore...", which is grammatically a whole sentence, although Heidi says it so fast that non-German speakers may be forgiven for assuming that it's one of those ridiculously long compound words.
** In the episode "Farhampton", Klaus (the German suitor of Ted's ex-girlfriend Victoria) teaches Ted the word "Lebenslangerschicksalsschatz", which he (correctly) translates as "lifelong treasure of destiny". Grammatically, this are actually two separate (compound-)words ("lebenslanger Schicksalsschatz"). Also, this is not actually a common expression in German, though "Schatz" (treasure) is indeed a common German term of endearment, just like "honey" is in English.
* Creator/VanKootenEnDeBie: Mr. O. den Beste who is a former German language teacher and thus often uses untranslated German expressions and sayings in his vocabulary.
* In ''Series/MajimuriGakuen'', the AbsurdlyPowerfulStudentCouncil are inspired by the Nazi and its members have German words as nicknames.
* On ''Real Husbands of Hollywood'', Boris Kodjoe, playing a fictionalized version of himself, speaks German sometimes (one episode features his German ex-girlfriend trying to get back with him). Kodjoe is actually German thus he is fluent in German as well as English.
* In an episode of ''Series/{{Voyagers}}'' Bogg pretends to be a German boxer who volunteers to spar with Joe Louis prior to Louis's match with Max Schmeling in 1938. Jeff calls him to come over by saying ''kommen sie''. Later Jeff encourages Bogg in the ring by saying ''fighten sie!''
* In the second season of ''Series/WynonnaEarp'', the Iron Witch (who looks like she's Latina or Native American) inexplicably chants her old family magic in German. We only hear parts of it, but what can be understood is grammatically wrong or clearly too-literally translated from English.
* There's an episode of ''Series/StargateAtlantis'' in which a random extra playing a scientist makes some comments in German, like "this reminds me of the birth of my nephew" (about an alien wetware tech space shuttle they were dissecting). Unusually, the grammar and pronunciation of these lines is ''perfect''. It turns out, the extra was actually a German ex-pat normally working in the make-up crew of the show, and the lines were [[ThrowItIn ad-libbed]].
* ''Series/MacGyver1985'': Invoked and lampshaded whenever German is spoken; it's the one language [=MacGyver=] could never get the hang of. Sometimes PlayedForLaughs:
-->'''[=MacGyver=]''' ''(translated, speaking to SecretPolice)'': "We were picking apples in the forest. And this...(pointing to Jack)...this is my ''wife!''"
* Any episode of ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' featuring the Thule society is sure to include several instances of this.

Added DiffLines:

* Any episode of ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' featuring the Thule society is sure to include several instances of this.


** Though until the 80's they did translated all titles and names. Interesting they renamed the X-men as X-Team.

to:

** Though until the 80's '80s they did translated translate all titles and names. Interesting they renamed the X-men as X-Team.



* ''Fanfic/TheChildOfLove'': Used by Asuka here and there. Unfortunately it is obvious that the writer did not know German and he sometimes misspelled words (like “oberarsche” or “scheist”).

to:

* ''Fanfic/TheChildOfLove'': Used by Asuka here and there. Unfortunately Unfortunately, it is obvious that the writer did not know German and he sometimes misspelled words (like “oberarsche” or “scheist”).



* ''Fanfic/{{Jericho}}'', a ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' fanfiction, has the [[FirstPersonSmartass narrator]], the eponymous Jericho, drop bits of German when he speaks. Jericho also notes that when he gets nervous or otherwise heavily emotional, he tends to speaks in more a more literal German-to-English manner, which effectively makes him sound as if he were speaking straight out of Shakespeare. Justified in that German—in-universe, called ''Teutsch''—is his first language, and (very rarely) he does mistranslate.

to:

* ''Fanfic/{{Jericho}}'', a ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' fanfiction, has the [[FirstPersonSmartass narrator]], the eponymous Jericho, drop bits of German when he speaks. Jericho also notes that when he gets nervous or otherwise heavily emotional, he tends to speaks speak in more a more literal German-to-English manner, which effectively makes him sound as if he were speaking straight out of Shakespeare. Justified in that German—in-universe, called ''Teutsch''—is his first language, and (very rarely) he does mistranslate.



** In Germany, that was changed into [[KeepItForeign Danish]]. In other episodes she speaks Swedish, or a Swiss dialect. As a rule of thumb for the German dub: When Elliot talks in a language other than German she speaks German in the original English version.

to:

** In Germany, that was changed into [[KeepItForeign Danish]]. In other episodes episodes, she speaks Swedish, Swedish or a Swiss dialect. As a rule of thumb for the German dub: When Elliot talks in a language other than German she speaks German in the original English version.



* ''Series/TheXFiles'': has numerous examples of this trope. "Die Hand Die Verletzt" features a Satanic cult that inexplicably chants auf Deutsch during its ceremonies. "Unruhe" features a serial killer who taunts his victims in German. In this episode we learn Scully learned German in college and she speaks a few phrases. Then there's "Triangle," a dream/fantasy episode which recasts the series villains as Nazis in a World War II setting.

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* ''Series/TheXFiles'': has numerous examples of this trope. "Die Hand Die Verletzt" features a Satanic cult that inexplicably chants auf Deutsch during its ceremonies. "Unruhe" features a serial killer who taunts his victims in German. In this episode episode, we learn Scully learned German in college and she speaks a few phrases. Then there's "Triangle," a dream/fantasy episode which recasts the series villains as Nazis in a World War II setting.



* There's an episode of ''Series/StargateAtlantis'' in which a random extra playing a scientist makes some comments in German, like "this reminds me of the birth of my nephew" (about an alien wetware tech space shuttle they were dissecting). Unusually, the grammar and pronounciation of these lines is ''perfect''. It turns out, the extra was actually a German ex-pat normally working in the make-up crew of the show, and the lines were [[ThrowItIn ad-libbed]].

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* There's an episode of ''Series/StargateAtlantis'' in which a random extra playing a scientist makes some comments in German, like "this reminds me of the birth of my nephew" (about an alien wetware tech space shuttle they were dissecting). Unusually, the grammar and pronounciation pronunciation of these lines is ''perfect''. It turns out, the extra was actually a German ex-pat normally working in the make-up crew of the show, and the lines were [[ThrowItIn ad-libbed]].



** It's a variety act called "speaking Double Dutch" that Chaplin had learned to do when he performed in music halls and vaudeville, before he got into movies.

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** It's a variety act called "speaking Double Dutch" that Chaplin had learned to do when he performed in music halls and vaudeville, vaudeville before he got into movies.



*** [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LdPMSd7xA7U "Das bayrische Restaurant Stück"]] is a very good example for this. The pronounciation isn't actually that bad, every sentence is perfectly understandable.

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*** [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LdPMSd7xA7U "Das bayrische Restaurant Stück"]] is a very good example for this. The pronounciation pronunciation isn't actually that bad, every sentence is perfectly understandable.



* ''Film/TopSecret'' has quite some written Gratuitous German, for example signs like "Der Pizza Haus" or "Das Fencen Switchen".

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* ''Film/TopSecret'' has quite some written Gratuitous German, for example example, signs like "Der Pizza Haus" or "Das Fencen Switchen".



* Gabrielle Union's character in ''Film/NeoNed'' (an independent film starring ''Creator/JeremyRenner'') is committed to a mental institution because she thinks she's the reincarnated Hitler. She delivers about three barely understandable German lines. [[spoiler: This trope is subverted later in the movie when she admits that her German is prety "shoddy" and that she only had a few German classes in High School.]]

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* Gabrielle Union's character in ''Film/NeoNed'' (an independent film starring ''Creator/JeremyRenner'') is committed to a mental institution because she thinks she's the reincarnated Hitler. She delivers about three barely understandable German lines. [[spoiler: This trope is subverted later in the movie when she admits that her German is prety pretty "shoddy" and that she only had a few German classes in High School.]]



* Averted in the movie ''The Diary Of Anne Frankenstein'' which is part of the movie ''Chillerama'': All actors speak very good German. Parodied for Hitler, who does speak only gibberish. He starts out with some phrases that do sound like German, but are just utterly nonsense. As the movie within the movie progresses, Hitler's lines become more and more gibberish, that doesn't even sound like German anymore. All the other characters understand him perfectly fine at all times, though.

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* Averted in the movie ''The Diary Of Anne Frankenstein'' which is part of the movie ''Chillerama'': All actors speak very good German. Parodied for Hitler, who does speak only gibberish. He starts out with some phrases that do sound like German, German but are just utterly utter nonsense. As the movie within the movie progresses, Hitler's lines become more and more gibberish, that doesn't even sound like German anymore. All the other characters understand him perfectly fine at all times, though.



* WebVideo/CatMuto uses German words at odd times, when she cannot remember the English word. This included her referring to [[VideoGame/LiveALive Yuan]] as ''schmächtig'' (weedy, lank) or flat-out switching to German, when [[Franchise/AceAttorney Detective Gumshoe]] mentioned the new prosecutor having been in Germany for years.

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* WebVideo/CatMuto uses German words at odd times, times when she cannot remember the English word. This included her referring to [[VideoGame/LiveALive Yuan]] as ''schmächtig'' (weedy, lank) or flat-out switching to German, when [[Franchise/AceAttorney Detective Gumshoe]] mentioned the new prosecutor having been in Germany for years.



* ''TabletopGame/BattleTech'' has some of these especially with the Lyran Commonwealth. Their rank system uses words such as Kommandant-Major and Hauptmann-Captain. Also shows up in the names of some of their units, like the Blitzkrieg and Eisenfaust (Iron Fist) Battlemechs, Schildkröte (Turtle) medium tank, and Morgenstern (Morning Star) aerospace fighter.

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* ''TabletopGame/BattleTech'' has some of these these, especially with the Lyran Commonwealth. Their rank system uses words such as Kommandant-Major and Hauptmann-Captain. Also shows up in the names of some of their units, like the Blitzkrieg and Eisenfaust (Iron Fist) Battlemechs, Schildkröte (Turtle) medium tank, and Morgenstern (Morning Star) aerospace fighter.



* In the first book of his ''Expanse'' series, James S.A. Corey introduces the reader to his version of a pan-European space accent made up of various languages spoken by the working class Belters. When Detective Miller tries to quell a riot, he is confronted by a brute telling him to ''"Schrauben sie sie weibchen"''. There are mistakes in both ortography and punctuation (the correct version being "Schrauben Sie, Sie Weibchen."), but that may be explained away by the fact that it's the future and the speaking person is uneducated. However, the words don´t even make sense on the most basic level. "Schrauben" is the literal translation of "to screw", but in German does not carry the sexual connotation. Moreover, the expression "screw you" would in German require a reflexive pronoun ("sich"/"yourself") if the brute (uncharacteristically) uses the polite "Sie"("Thou") instead of "Du"/"Dich"("you"). Finally, "Weibchen" only means "female animal of any species", not "bitch"/"female dog".

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* In the first book of his ''Expanse'' series, James S.A. Corey introduces the reader to his version of a pan-European space accent made up of various languages spoken by the working class Belters. When Detective Miller tries to quell a riot, he is confronted by a brute telling him to ''"Schrauben sie sie weibchen"''. There are mistakes in both ortography orthography and punctuation (the correct version being "Schrauben Sie, Sie Weibchen."), but that may be explained away by the fact that it's the future and the speaking person is uneducated. However, the words don´t even make sense on the most basic level. "Schrauben" is the literal translation of "to screw", but in German does not carry the sexual connotation. Moreover, the expression "screw you" would in German require a reflexive pronoun ("sich"/"yourself") if the brute (uncharacteristically) uses the polite "Sie"("Thou") instead of "Du"/"Dich"("you"). Finally, "Weibchen" only means "female animal of any species", not "bitch"/"female dog".



* Rudolf Von Flugel, from Creator/RichardScarry's childrens' stories, is prone to this sort of thing.

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* Rudolf Von Flugel, from Creator/RichardScarry's childrens' children's stories, is prone to this sort of thing.



** Justified in-universe by a few hundred years of language drift and the influence of the chinese parts of the population

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** Justified in-universe by a few hundred years of language drift and the influence of the chinese Chinese parts of the population



* Music/TheBeatles recorded versions of "She Loves You" and "I Want To Hold Your Hand" in German. They only knew the words phonetically, as none of them spoke German. Plus: none of them actually liked doing it. They almost boycotted the session, but did it on the condition that they didn't have to do anything like that again.
** This was ostensibly the decision of the record company, to break The Beatles to the German market. The Beatles became popular in Germany during their time spent in Hamburg during 1960-1962, well before they were widely known outside of Liverpool. The English language versions of "She Loves You" and "I Want To Hold Your Hand" had already been hits in Germany as well, and whilst the German language single was a big hit, the English versions continue to be more popular. The German version of "Hand" was included on the US album "Something New" and is more widely known for this. Both German language versions are also available on the compilation album ''Music/PastMasters''.

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* Music/TheBeatles recorded versions of "She Loves You" and "I Want To Hold Your Hand" in German. They only knew the words phonetically, as none of them spoke German. Plus: none of them actually liked doing it. They almost boycotted the session, session but did it on the condition that they didn't have to do anything like that again.
** This was ostensibly the decision of the record company, to break The Beatles to the German market. The Beatles became popular in Germany during their time spent in Hamburg during 1960-1962, well before they were widely known outside of Liverpool. The English language versions of "She Loves You" and "I Want To Hold Your Hand" had already been hits in Germany as well, and whilst the German language German-language single was a big hit, the English versions continue to be more popular. The German version of "Hand" was included on the US album "Something New" and is more widely known for this. Both German language German-language versions are also available on the compilation album ''Music/PastMasters''.



* Music/ElliotGoldenthal is a well known modern classical composer that has worked for the soundtrack of many movies, and has a sense of humor when he puts titles on the tracks of his albums. One of the tracks in the ''Film/BatmanForever'' soundtrack is "Fledermausmarschmusik". It's obvious what it means and what it sounds like.

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* Music/ElliotGoldenthal is a well known modern classical composer that has worked for the soundtrack of many movies, movies and has a sense of humor when he puts titles on the tracks of his albums. One of the tracks in the ''Film/BatmanForever'' soundtrack is "Fledermausmarschmusik". It's obvious what it means and what it sounds like.



** "Sofa" on ''Music/OneSizeFitsAll'' is completely sang in German.

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** "Sofa" on ''Music/OneSizeFitsAll'' is completely sang sung in German.



* Music/DavidBowie's "'Heroes'" from ''Music/HeroesDavidBowieAlbum'' has a TitleTrack where two people meet near the Berlin Wall. The song became a monster hit in Germany and thus Bowie also recorded a German language version called "Helden".

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* Music/DavidBowie's "'Heroes'" from ''Music/HeroesDavidBowieAlbum'' has a TitleTrack where two people meet near the Berlin Wall. The song became a monster hit in Germany and thus Bowie also recorded a German language German-language version called "Helden".



** "The Black Rider" from ''Music/TheBlackRider'' is sang with a mock German accent.

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** "The Black Rider" from ''Music/TheBlackRider'' is sang sung with a mock German accent.



* When the British punk/dance band ''Fuzzbox'' covered Music/YokoOno's "Walking On Thin Ice", they translated the spoken word passage to German for some reason. The translation is flawless however and so is the delivery. In fact it sounds as if a native speaker spoke this passage, but the album doesn't feature any credits whatsoever so it can't be said for sure.

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* When the British punk/dance band ''Fuzzbox'' covered Music/YokoOno's "Walking On Thin Ice", they translated the spoken word passage to German for some reason. The translation is flawless however and so is the delivery. In fact fact, it sounds as if a native speaker spoke this passage, but the album doesn't feature any credits whatsoever so it can't be said for sure.



* Swedish {{Europop}} group E-Type invoke this in the chorus of "Es ist nie vorbei (It's Not Over)", featuring Jasmin "Blümchen" Wagner.

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* Swedish {{Europop}} group E-Type invoke invokes this in the chorus of "Es ist nie vorbei (It's Not Over)", featuring Jasmin "Blümchen" Wagner.



* Many, if not most, of the {{Real Robot}}s in ''VideoGame/SuperRobotWars'' have German names. The OriginalGeneration games gives these robots the main role.

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* Many, if not most, of the {{Real Robot}}s in ''VideoGame/SuperRobotWars'' have German names. The OriginalGeneration games gives give these robots the main role.



** Some of Medic's items have psuedo-German names (i.e

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** Some of Medic's items have psuedo-German pseudo-German names (i.e



** Trucy Wright, a magician and Apollo's assistant frequently performs at place called the Wunderbar, combining Gratuitous German with PunnyName.

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** Trucy Wright, a magician and Apollo's assistant frequently performs at a place called the Wunderbar, combining Gratuitous German with PunnyName.



* The FinalBoss battle against Yami in ''[[VideoGame/OnePieceUnlimitedCruise One Piece: Unlimited Cruise 2]]'' has Ominous German Chanting for its BGM. While it [[SugarWiki/AwesomeMusic sounds awesome]], it's not particularly good or coherent German, and seems to mostly consist of verbs thrown together.

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* The FinalBoss battle against Yami in ''[[VideoGame/OnePieceUnlimitedCruise One Piece: Unlimited Cruise 2]]'' has Ominous German Chanting for its BGM. While it [[SugarWiki/AwesomeMusic sounds awesome]], it's not particularly good or coherent German, German and seems to mostly consist of verbs thrown together.



* In the ''VideoGame/FrontMission'' series, the HumongousMecha [[AMechByAnyOtherName are called "wanzers."]] Wanzer is a shortening of "Wanderung Panzer", where ''panzer'' means ''tank'' in German. Lastly, in the first game there is a mech-mountable rocket launcher named "[[StealthPun Wanzerfaust]]".

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* In the ''VideoGame/FrontMission'' series, the HumongousMecha [[AMechByAnyOtherName are called "wanzers."]] Wanzer is a shortening of "Wanderung Panzer", where ''panzer'' means ''tank'' in German. Lastly, in the first game game, there is a mech-mountable rocket launcher named "[[StealthPun Wanzerfaust]]".



** While most of [[VideoGame/TalesOfRebirth Saleh]]'s moves are in English, his LimitBreak is the OddNameOut in that its called "Steif Brise", meaning "stiff breeze" in German. This was fixed in the English release of ''Tales of Link'' where Saleh was a boss in some higher level events. There, it was translated as..."Stiff Breeze", fittingly.

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** While most of [[VideoGame/TalesOfRebirth Saleh]]'s moves are in English, his LimitBreak is the OddNameOut in that its called "Steif Brise", meaning "stiff breeze" in German. This was fixed in the English release of ''Tales of Link'' where Saleh was a boss in some higher level higher-level events. There, it was translated as..."Stiff Breeze", fittingly.



* In ''[[VideoGame/MightAndMagic Heroes of Might and Magic V]]'' a few of the ''Haven'' units have text written on their robes. You can clearly see "Die Heiligkeit" (the sanctity/saintliness) written on the cape and the robe of the Angel/Archangel. Other ''Haven'' units also have text written on their robes and various ribbons and parchemins. You cannot precisely read them due the low resolution, but they seem to be in German and of the same kind, too. Though this is never explained why.

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* In ''[[VideoGame/MightAndMagic Heroes of Might and Magic V]]'' a few of the ''Haven'' units have text written on their robes. You can clearly see "Die Heiligkeit" (the sanctity/saintliness) written on the cape and the robe of the Angel/Archangel. Other ''Haven'' units also have text written on their robes and various ribbons and parchemins. You cannot precisely read them due to the low resolution, but they seem to be in German and of the same kind, too. Though this is never explained why.



** Bullenfogel is supposed to be Brennvogel, burn-bird (although you'd say Brennender Vogel, birning bird in German - or, more simply: Phönix)
** Geuschbenst is supposed to be Gespenst, meaning ghost (or, more literaly, "spook")

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** Bullenfogel is supposed to be Brennvogel, burn-bird (although you'd say Brennender Vogel, birning burning bird in German - or, more simply: Phönix)
** Geuschbenst is supposed to be Gespenst, meaning ghost (or, more literaly, literally, "spook")



* Video game / music example: ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquerRedAlert'''s trademark musical track, Hell March, includes a single line of German voice-over... for a song that's supposed to represent the USSR. (Germany is in fact one of the Allies in this timeline.) No one knows why, exactly, but the "erroneous" sound clip has never been corrected or replaced, despite each Red Alert title coming with a new version of the Hell March. The line in question is "Die Waffen, legt an!" (Ready your weapons), but can and frequently has been easily {{m|ondegreen}}isunderstood as "We want war, wake up!"

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* Video game / music game/music example: ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquerRedAlert'''s trademark musical track, Hell March, includes a single line of German voice-over... for a song that's supposed to represent the USSR. (Germany is is, in fact fact, one of the Allies in this timeline.) No one knows why, exactly, but the "erroneous" sound clip has never been corrected or replaced, despite each Red Alert title coming with a new version of the Hell March. The line in question is "Die Waffen, legt an!" (Ready your weapons), but can and frequently has been easily {{m|ondegreen}}isunderstood as "We want war, wake up!"



-->'''Krusty''': ''"Heil! Heil!"'' (which actually got its sound track deleted in the German version)

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-->'''Krusty''': ''"Heil! Heil!"'' (which actually got its sound track soundtrack deleted in the German version)



* Creator/DingoPictures, a German company that produced knockoffs of animated movies in the 90s, often has German words in the backgrounds of shots, examples being "Polizei" (police) and "Tierheim" (animal hospital). In some cases, they forget to dub over German words, an example being during their version of Pocahontas where the title character says "Nein!". In a number of cases they either leave German songs in the English dub or they dub the English directly over them. Wabuu's theme song as heard during ''Countryside Bears'' is an infamous example. In addition, many of the characters retain distinctly German names, such as Wuschel the squirrel. In at least one case they lampshaded this by explicitly setting ''Mouse Police'' in Germany.

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* Creator/DingoPictures, a German company that produced knockoffs of animated movies in the 90s, often has German words in the backgrounds of shots, examples being "Polizei" (police) and "Tierheim" (animal hospital). In some cases, they forget to dub over German words, an example being during their version of Pocahontas where the title character says "Nein!". In a number of cases cases, they either leave German songs in the English dub or they dub the English directly over them. Wabuu's theme song as heard during ''Countryside Bears'' is an infamous example. In addition, many of the characters retain distinctly German names, such as Wuschel the squirrel. In at least one case they lampshaded this by explicitly setting ''Mouse Police'' in Germany.



* In the late 19th century on the territory of today's Czech Republic, which at the time was under the Habsburg Monarchy, the Czech language was spoken only among low class citizens and the main and official language was German. This sparked the Czech National Revival whose main goal was to restore the Czech language. The problem was that there was no official Czech language, and many things didn't even have words in Czech and were borrowed mainly from German. The efforts in reviving the language and nation were successful, but it still has a lot of words that are German or are at least modified versions of them. To this day it is probably the second most important language in the Czech Republic, after English.

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* In the late 19th century on the territory of today's Czech Republic, which at the time was under the Habsburg Monarchy, the Czech language was spoken only among low class low-class citizens and the main and official language was German. This sparked the Czech National Revival whose main goal was to restore the Czech language. The problem was that there was no official Czech language, and many things didn't even have words in Czech and were borrowed mainly from German. The efforts in reviving the language and nation were successful, but it still has a lot of words that are German or are at least modified versions of them. To this day it is probably the second most important language in the Czech Republic, after English.



** In mathematics and computeability, we have the term "Entscheidungsproblem", literally translating into "Problem of making a decision". The Entscheidungsproblem refers to the question if a mathematical task is computeable. Most famous use of the word is the article "On Computeable Numbers, with an application to the Entscheidungsproblem", by Alan Turing, which defined the famous Turing Machine.

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** In mathematics and computeability, computability, we have the term "Entscheidungsproblem", literally translating into "Problem of making a decision". The Entscheidungsproblem refers to the question if a mathematical task is computeable. computable. Most famous use of the word is the article "On Computeable Computable Numbers, with an application to the Entscheidungsproblem", by Alan Turing, which defined the famous Turing Machine.



** Martin Heidegger is one noteable case here. This is because most of his terms are extremely difficult to translate.

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** Martin Heidegger is one noteable notable case here. This is because most of his terms are extremely difficult to translate.



* The American fast food chain (Der)[[note]]The "Der" hasn't been officially used in the name since 1977, although some older restaurants still have their original signage.[[/note]] Wienerschnitzel. According to Wiki/TheOtherWiki, one would normally use the neuter form "das" for "Wienerschnitzel". Additionally, a "Wiener Schnitzel" (which of course comes from Austria[[note]]Whose captial city is Vienna, or "Wien" in the original German, hence the name.[[/note]]) is a completely different food entirely from a hot dog (sometimes called a "wiener"[[note]]also spelled "weiner"[[/note]]), which the restaurant chain specializes in. In Germany, some sausages (similar to hot dogs) are called "Wiener Würstchen", hence the misunderstanding. And, by the way, the correct German name would be "Wiener Schnitzel" , not "Wienerschnitzel".
** The Most famous german restaurant in tokio is called "Die Wurst", meaning "The sausage".
* The very words "Hamburger" (of or relating to Hamburg), "Frankfurter"[[note]]While sometimes used to refer to hot dogs (along with the shortented form "franks"), it actually comes from "Frankfurter Würstchen", which is a similar, but slightly different food.[[/note]] (of or relating to Frankfurt), and the aforementioned "Wiener" as used in North America and around the world. Furthermore, it's unclear what Germany's role, if any, is in the creation of the modern hamburger sandwich[[note]]Which is similar to "Hamburg steak", but not quite the same thing as an actual hamburger.[[/note]].

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* The American fast food fast-food chain (Der)[[note]]The "Der" hasn't been officially used in the name since 1977, although some older restaurants still have their original signage.[[/note]] Wienerschnitzel. According to Wiki/TheOtherWiki, one would normally use the neuter form "das" for "Wienerschnitzel". Additionally, a "Wiener Schnitzel" (which of course comes from Austria[[note]]Whose captial capital city is Vienna, or "Wien" in the original German, hence the name.[[/note]]) is a completely different food entirely from a hot dog (sometimes called a "wiener"[[note]]also spelled "weiner"[[/note]]), which the restaurant chain specializes in. In Germany, some sausages (similar to hot dogs) are called "Wiener Würstchen", hence the misunderstanding. And, by the way, the correct German name would be "Wiener Schnitzel" , not "Wienerschnitzel".
** The Most most famous german German restaurant in tokio Tokyo is called "Die Wurst", meaning "The sausage".
* The very words "Hamburger" (of or relating to Hamburg), "Frankfurter"[[note]]While sometimes used to refer to hot dogs (along with the shortented shortened form "franks"), it actually comes from "Frankfurter Würstchen", which is a similar, but slightly different food.[[/note]] (of or relating to Frankfurt), and the aforementioned "Wiener" as used in North America and around the world. Furthermore, it's unclear what Germany's role, if any, is in the creation of the modern hamburger sandwich[[note]]Which is similar to "Hamburg steak", but not quite the same thing as an actual hamburger.[[/note]].



* A notable habit of the russian philosopher Alexander Dugin. He sometimes puts into his speeches and books whole german sentences. (For example "Dasein heißt Mitsein" meaning "Existing means existing together with other humans" or "Dasein ist Voelkisch", roughly translated to "Existence is closely related to Cultures/Civilisations". He even calls his magnum opus the "political theory of Dasein".) One big reason for this is, that he frequently refers to Martin Heidegger, whose terms are notoriously difficult to translate into other languages. This is the reason why some other Heidegger scholars also used german words to describe his philosophy. (This is one reason, why the word "Angst", literally meaning Fear or Anxiety, entered the english language. ) Dugin also often uses german words, which are deemed politically incorrect in germany. Best example is the already mentioned word "Voelkisch", which has an extremely negative connotation because the Nazis called themselves the "voelkisch" movement. Dugin also adores the german culture til the 1960s (but he thinks, afterwards, globalism and americanism have destroyed the original german culture.) and one of the main pillars of his eurasian empire would be a close alliance between germany and russia.

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* A notable habit of the russian Russian philosopher Alexander Dugin. He sometimes puts into his speeches and books whole german sentences. (For example "Dasein heißt Mitsein" meaning "Existing means existing together with other humans" or "Dasein ist Voelkisch", roughly translated to "Existence is closely related to Cultures/Civilisations". He even calls his magnum opus the "political theory of Dasein".) One big reason for this is, that he frequently refers to Martin Heidegger, whose terms are notoriously difficult to translate into other languages. This is the reason why some other Heidegger scholars also used german words to describe his philosophy. (This is one reason, why the word "Angst", literally meaning Fear or Anxiety, entered the english English language. ) Dugin also often uses german German words, which are deemed politically incorrect in germany.Germany. Best example is the already mentioned word "Voelkisch", which has an extremely negative connotation because the Nazis called themselves the "voelkisch" movement. Dugin also adores the german culture til the 1960s (but he thinks, afterwards, globalism and americanism Americanism have destroyed the original german culture.) and one of the main pillars of his eurasian Eurasian empire would be a close alliance between germany Germany and russia.Russia.

Added DiffLines:

* Swedish {{Europop}} group E-Type invoke this in the chorus of "Es ist nie vorbei (It's Not Over)", featuring Jasmin "Blümchen" Wagner.


* Wrestling/{{Chikara}} had the Swiss [[PowerStable stable]] Die Bruderschaft des Kreuzes (brotherhood of the cross, more commonly known as BDK), among whom, Ares and Wrestling/ClaudioCastagnoli cut entire promos in German.

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* Wrestling/{{Chikara}} had the Swiss [[PowerStable stable]] Die Bruderschaft des Kreuzes Wrestling/DieBruderschaftDesKreuzes (brotherhood of the cross, more commonly known as BDK), among whom, Ares and Wrestling/ClaudioCastagnoli cut entire promos in German.


* ''Series/DoctorWho'' shows that Japan doesn't have the monopoly on Gratuitous German. "Exterminieren! Exterminieren!" Especially grating since "exterminieren" is not even a proper word (at least not one anyone actually uses), just the usual "Exterminate!" with a common verb ending. More accurate alternative would be "eliminieren" (which was used by the actual German dub), or "vernichten", which, while being closer to "destroy" or "annihilate", was what the... main inspiration for the Daleks used in a similar context.

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* ''Series/DoctorWho'' shows that Japan doesn't have the monopoly on Gratuitous German. "Exterminieren! Exterminieren!" German: [[AC:"Exterminieren! Exterminieren!"]] Especially grating since "exterminieren" is not even a proper word (at least not one anyone actually uses), just the usual "Exterminate!" [[AC:"Exterminate!"]] with a common verb ending. More accurate alternative would be "eliminieren" [[AC:"Eliminieren!"]] (which was used by the actual German dub), or "vernichten", [[AC:"Vernichten!"]], which, while being closer to "destroy" or "annihilate", was what the... [[ANaziByAnyOtherName main inspiration for the Daleks Daleks]] used in a similar context.

Added DiffLines:

** Some of Medic's items have psuedo-German names (i.e
"Metalmeatencasen", "Feelingbetterbager", or "Hazmattenhatten")

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