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* Your allies death in the [[VideoGame/TelepathRPG Telepath RPG serie]] [[WeCannotGoOnWithoutYou though the trope doesn't apply to the protagonists.]]
** In chapter 2 you can just pay a bit of gold so someone will ask the shadowling queen to revive them. It can be pretty bad during battles themselves however, since people cannot be resurrected in-battle, and it reduces the amount of gold you gain after a battle.
** In [[VideoGame/TelepathRPGServantsOfGod Servants of God (chapter 3)]] Luca can resurect any death allies as long as she have soul charges which she can easilly farm by killing ennemies with her soul suck attack. Luca herself and an other teammate named Rajav will always be resurected at the end of a fight if they die since they are spirits thus already dead.


* Surprisingly, used in an anime. In ''Anime/AngelBeats!'', being mutilated beyond recognition is roughly equal to being knocked unconscious until the bizarre universe pulls you back together. This makes sense, though, because they are ''already dead''.

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* Surprisingly, used in an anime. In ''Manga/Ajin'', one of the powers of the ajins is to come back from death. It really just incapacitates them for a couple of seconds.
*
In ''Anime/AngelBeats!'', being mutilated beyond recognition is roughly equal to being knocked unconscious until the bizarre universe pulls you back together. This makes sense, though, because they are ''already dead''.


* Losing a battle in VideoGame/RPGMaker game ''VideoGame/StandstillGirl'' only makes you return to the [[HubLevel Land of Time]], with all your items and experience intact. You do have to walk back to whatever level you were on, though.

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* Losing a battle in VideoGame/RPGMaker UsefulNotes/RPGMaker game ''VideoGame/StandstillGirl'' only makes you return to the [[HubLevel Land of Time]], with all your items and experience intact. You do have to walk back to whatever level you were on, though.


* Quite an unusual example for the genre, but in ''VideoGame/SaveTheDate'', not only is your date's death a relatively trivial occurrence, it's integral to making progress in the game.

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* Quite an unusual example for the genre, but in ''VideoGame/SaveTheDate'', ''[[VisualNovel/SavetheDatePaperDino Save the Date]]'', not only is your date's death a relatively trivial occurrence, it's integral to making progress in the game.


* The ''VideoGame/DarkSouls'' games are surprisingly forgiving about this, which is good because [[NintendoHard you'll probably be dying a lot.]]
** In ''{{VideoGame/Dark Souls I}}'', dying sends you back to the last bonfire you rested at, with no souls or liquid humanity, and turning you into a hollow if you weren't one before. Aside from that, though, all progress is kept, including any items you picked up, and if you didn't have very many souls or humanity to start with (say, you spent them all at a merchant) then it's no different than going back to that bonfire and resting at it. Or you could just retrace your steps and pick up your lost souls from the spot where you died as long as you don't die again along the way. As a result, you can use strategic deaths as a cheap [[EscapeRope Homeward Bone]] alternative to get around faster, or to pick up items in hazardous locations long before you have the means to acquire them safely.
** ''{{VideoGame/Dark Souls II}}'' punishes repeated deaths a little more, by making the [[MaximumHPReduction HP loss]] from hollowing gradually ramp up to 50%, rather than the all-or-nothing 30% in the first game. It's still fully reversible by spending a single Human Effigy, and there's a ring which prevents hollowing that (unlike its counterparts in the other two games) can be repaired after each use for a paltry[[labelnote:*]](or hefty-but-probably-still-worth-it on NewGamePlus)[[/labelnote]] sum of souls. [[spoiler: The ''Scholar of the First Sin'' DLC also adds a way to semi-permanently prevent hollowing.]]
** ''{{VideoGame/Dark Souls III}}'' works like the first game other than cosmetic changes. Instead of hollowing when you die, you simply lose your [[SuperMode Embered form]] if you had it enabled along with the HP bonus it conferred. [[spoiler: You can enable ''Dark Souls I''-style hollowing as part of a sidequest, but again, the effects are only cosmetic and can be reversed or [[{{Glamour}} obscured]] if you have the means.]]

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* The ''Soulsborne'' games (''VideoGame/DemonsSouls'', the ''VideoGame/DarkSouls'' games trilogy, and ''VideoGame/{{Bloodborne}}'') are surprisingly forgiving about this, which is good because known for being [[NintendoHard you'll probably be brutally difficult games]] where you will die a ''lot''. Mercifully, dying is not too much of a lot.]]
punishment.
** In ''{{VideoGame/Dark Souls I}}'', dying sends Though each game has its own special punishment for dying, the main punishment in all of them is that you drop all of your currently held souls/Blood Echoes (which function as both ExperiencePoints and currency) where you died. If you make it back to the last bonfire that spot without dying again, you rested at, with no souls or liquid humanity, and turning get to pick them back up. If you into a hollow if do die again, then they're lost forever, but no big deal, you weren't one before. Aside from that, though, all progress is kept, including any items can always get more by beating up more enemies. If you picked up, and if you didn't don't have very many souls or humanity to start with (say, souls/Echoes on you spent them all at a merchant) to begin with, then it's no different than going dying on purpose can actually be a very convenient way to quickly get back to that bonfire and resting at it. Or you could just retrace your steps and pick up your lost souls from the spot where you died as long as you don't die again along the way. As a result, Archstone/bonfire/lamp, or you can use strategic deaths as make a cheap [[EscapeRope Homeward Bone]] alternative suicide run to get [[DiscOneNuke grab a powerful item early]] before being clobbered by a BeefGate that's 30+ levels above you.
** In ''VideoGame/DemonsSouls'', dying in Body Form causes you to come back in Soul Form, which halves your max health. However, the game is balanced
around faster, or to pick up items being in hazardous locations long before you have Soul Form most of the means to acquire them safely.
** ''{{VideoGame/Dark Souls II}}'' punishes repeated deaths a little more, by making
time anyway, as the [[MaximumHPReduction HP loss]] from hollowing gradually ramp up only way to 50%, regain Body Form is to beat a boss, help another player beat a boss, invade and kill another player, or use a Stone of Ephemeral Eyes which are rare and expensive. It's more accurate to say that Body Form doubles your max health rather than the all-or-nothing 30% saying Soul Form halves it. There's also a ring you can find in the very first game. It's still fully reversible area of the game (outside of the tutorial and hub world) that increases your max health while in Soul Form to 75% of that of your Body Form, somewhat mitigating the penalty. Lastly, being in Soul Form means you can't be invaded by spending other players, which can be considered a single huge benefit depending on whether you want to be invaded or not. However, it also means you can't summon other players for help either. Of course, neither of those matter anymore since the online servers for the game were shut down in 2018 (though private servers for emulated copies of the game exist).
** In ''VideoGame/DarkSoulsI'', dying also causes you to drop your "soft" Humanity (the FanNickname for the Humanity stat, with "hard" Humanity being the item) along with your souls, which is also retrieved when picking up your dropped souls. If you end up losing it forever, it's easy to regain as there are several locations in the game where easily farmable enemies drop hard Humanity. Dying also turns you into a Hollow if you were human when you died. The only disadvantages to being a Hollow are the inability to summon friendly players for help or kindle bonfires to increase the number of Estus Flask charges they give you, and also ruining all your hard work in the character creator by making you look like a zombie (if you haven't [[ConcealedCustomization already ruined it yourself by putting a helmet over it]]). However, being Hollow means you can't be invaded either, so it's a fair tradeoff. To become a human again, you only need to spend one soft Humanity to Reverse Hollowing at a bonfire.
** ''VideoGame/DarkSoulsII'' brings back the ''Demon's Souls'' style punishment of halving your max health, but does so by lowering it gradually with each death as you gradually become more and more Hollow. Unlike ''Demon's Souls'', however, the
Human Effigy, Effigies that turn you human again are far more plentiful and easier to obtain than Stones of Ephemeral Eyes were. Also, just like in ''Demon's Souls'', there's a ring which prevents hollowing that (unlike its counterparts you can obtain very early in the other game that caps the penalty at 75% of your max health rather than half. Also, you still can't summon help while Hollow, but unlike the previous game you ''can'' be invaded. However, you can burn a Human Effigy in a bonfire to block all invasions in the surrounding area for half an hour.
** ''VideoGame/DarkSoulsIII'' goes back to only having
two games) can be repaired after each use for a paltry[[labelnote:*]](or hefty-but-probably-still-worth-it on NewGamePlus)[[/labelnote]] sum of souls. [[spoiler: The ''Scholar of the First Sin'' DLC also adds a way to semi-permanently prevent hollowing.]]
** ''{{VideoGame/Dark Souls III}}'' works
states like ''Demon's Souls'' and the first game other than cosmetic changes. Instead of hollowing when you die, you simply lose your [[SuperMode Embered form]] if you had it enabled along with the HP bonus it conferred. [[spoiler: You can enable ''Dark Souls I''-style hollowing Souls'', this time "embered" and "unembered". Being embered enables summoning/invasions and gives you an extra 30% max health, but the unembered health is treated as the default. You can regain your embered state when unembered by beating a boss, helping someone else beat a boss, invading someone and killing them, or simply using an Ember which are fairly commonly dropped by some enemies. There is no Hollowing at all at the start of the game (due to your character being an Unkindled and not a true Undead), but you can enable it as part of a sidequest, but again, the effects are only sidequest. However, it's purely cosmetic for the most part, and the one effect it does provide is entirely beneficial (using a "Hollow" weapon while Hollow increases your Luck stat, which Hollow weapons scale off of). Hollowing can be reversed either temporarily treated, pemanently cured, or [[{{Glamour}} obscured]] if simply hidden by wearing a ring that makes you have look human.
** ''VideoGame/{{Bloodborne}}'' is
the means.]]kindest game in the franchise, as its only unique punishment for dying is that sometimes your dropped Blood Echoes will be held by an enemy in the general vicinity of where you died instead of lying on the ground, forcing you to kill it to get them back, which is only really a problem if it happens to be the same enemy that killed you the last time. Of course, it makes up for this kindness by also being arguably the ''hardest'' game in the franchise.


** In 5e, the spell Revify which as long as the tagets body is still complete enough to function and their death has taken place in the last minuet(battles will practically never last that long)it allows you to bring someone back in about six secounds, with no side effects. Dying doesn't even mean your out of the fight.

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** In 5e, the spell Revify was added, which as long as the tagets body is still complete enough to function and their death has taken place in the last minuet(battles will practically never last that long)it allows you to bring someone back in about six secounds, with no side effects. Dying doesn't even mean your out of the fight.

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** In 5e, the spell Revify which as long as the tagets body is still complete enough to function and their death has taken place in the last minuet(battles will practically never last that long)it allows you to bring someone back in about six secounds, with no side effects. Dying doesn't even mean your out of the fight.


* ''VideoGame/MrHoppsPlayhouse'': If you get caught, you'll just be sent back to the progress of the last major item you found.

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* ''VideoGame/MrHoppsPlayhouse'': If you get caught, you'll just be sent back to the progress of from the last major item you found.

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* ''VideoGame/MrHoppsPlayhouse'': If you get caught, you'll just be sent back to the progress of the last major item you found.


* The ''VideoGame/DarkSouls'' games are surprisingly forgiving about this, which is good because [[NintendoHard you'll probably be dying a lot.]] Dying sends you back to the last bonfire you rested at, with no souls or liquid humanity, and turning you into a hollow if you weren't one before. Aside from that, though, all progress is kept, including any items you picked up, and if you didn't have very many souls or humanity to start with (say, you spent them all at a merchant) then it's no different than going back to that bonfire and resting at it. Or you could just retrace your steps and pick up your lost souls from the spot where you died as long as you don't die again along the way. As a result, you can use strategic deaths as a cheap [[EscapeRope Homeward Bone]] alternative to get around faster, or to pick up items in hazardous locations long before you have the means to acquire them safely.

to:

* The ''VideoGame/DarkSouls'' games are surprisingly forgiving about this, which is good because [[NintendoHard you'll probably be dying a lot.]] Dying ]]
** In ''{{VideoGame/Dark Souls I}}'', dying
sends you back to the last bonfire you rested at, with no souls or liquid humanity, and turning you into a hollow if you weren't one before. Aside from that, though, all progress is kept, including any items you picked up, and if you didn't have very many souls or humanity to start with (say, you spent them all at a merchant) then it's no different than going back to that bonfire and resting at it. Or you could just retrace your steps and pick up your lost souls from the spot where you died as long as you don't die again along the way. As a result, you can use strategic deaths as a cheap [[EscapeRope Homeward Bone]] alternative to get around faster, or to pick up items in hazardous locations long before you have the means to acquire them safely.safely.
** ''{{VideoGame/Dark Souls II}}'' punishes repeated deaths a little more, by making the [[MaximumHPReduction HP loss]] from hollowing gradually ramp up to 50%, rather than the all-or-nothing 30% in the first game. It's still fully reversible by spending a single Human Effigy, and there's a ring which prevents hollowing that (unlike its counterparts in the other two games) can be repaired after each use for a paltry[[labelnote:*]](or hefty-but-probably-still-worth-it on NewGamePlus)[[/labelnote]] sum of souls. [[spoiler: The ''Scholar of the First Sin'' DLC also adds a way to semi-permanently prevent hollowing.]]
** ''{{VideoGame/Dark Souls III}}'' works like the first game other than cosmetic changes. Instead of hollowing when you die, you simply lose your [[SuperMode Embered form]] if you had it enabled along with the HP bonus it conferred. [[spoiler: You can enable ''Dark Souls I''-style hollowing as part of a sidequest, but again, the effects are only cosmetic and can be reversed or [[{{Glamour}} obscured]] if you have the means.]]

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* In ''VideoGame/{{Hades}}'', dying resets your progress through Hades and forces you to start a new run, but also lets you keep certain items you found on the way out that can grant you permanent bonuses for your next run. The trope is also integral to the story: The protagonist, Zagreus, is the son of Hades and prince of the underworld, and cannot die permanently, and all the bosses he faces are employees of his father who similarly cannot die. Dying to, or killing, a boss on your way out will have both sides remark on it the next time you meet them as though you did little but temporarily inconvenience them, and in many ways you ''need'' to die -- repeatedly -- to obtain the power needed to complete the game.


* The VideoGame/{{Lego Adaptation Game}}s give you infinite lives, and you respawn on the spot with no progress lost, except in the first game's vehicle levels, which return you to checkpoints. The only penalty is that you drop some Lego studs (the game's currency), and you can just pick them back up when you respawn, unless you fall into a bottomless pit There's also an in-universe example in the ''Goblet of Fire'' portion of ''Harry Potter:'' [[spoiler:Cedric falls apart when killed with Avada Kedavra. When Harry gets back to Hogwarts with Cedric's body, Dumbledore hands Cedric's father instructions to put him back together.]]

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* The VideoGame/{{Lego Adaptation Game}}s give you infinite lives, and you respawn on the spot with no progress lost, except in the first game's vehicle levels, which return you to checkpoints. The only penalty is that you drop some Lego studs (the game's currency), and you can just pick them back up when you respawn, unless you fall into a bottomless pit pit. There's also an in-universe example in the ''Goblet of Fire'' portion of ''Harry Potter:'' [[spoiler:Cedric falls apart when killed with Avada Kedavra. When Harry gets back to Hogwarts with Cedric's body, Dumbledore hands Cedric's father instructions to put him back together.]]]]
** It gets lampshaded directly in ''Lego Batman 3'':
--->'''Kevin Smith:''' Seriously since when did videogames have to be so punishing? I mean, the best ones just let you die over and over with very little consequence other than losing studs, or you know...whatever.


* ''WebAnimation/InanimateInsanity'' doesn't feature death as often as BFDI, but the way characters are brought back to life just as easily is explained during season 2 by [=MePhone=] using an application within him to bring them back to life. This also justifies why Bow was KilledOffForReal, as [=MePhone=] had been killed at the moment when Bow died.

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* ''WebAnimation/InanimateInsanity'' doesn't feature death as often as BFDI, but the way characters are brought back to life just as easily is explained during season 2 by [=MePhone=] using an application within him to bring them back to life. [[spoiler: This also justifies why Bow was KilledOffForReal, as [=MePhone=] had been killed at the moment when Bow died.]]


* ''WebAnimation/InanimateInsanity'' doesn't feature death as often as BFDI, but the way characters are brought back to life just as easily is explained during season 2 by [=MePhone=] using an application within him to bring them back to life. This also justifies why Bow was KilledOffForReal, as [=MePhone=] had been killed at the moment when Bow died.

to:

* ''WebAnimation/InanimateInsanity'' doesn't feature death as often as BFDI, but the way characters are brought back to life just as easily is explained during season 2 by [=MePhone=] using an application within him to bring them back to life. [[spoiler: This also justifies why Bow was KilledOffForReal, as [=MePhone=] had been killed at the moment when Bow died.]]

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* In ''WebAnimation/BattleForDreamIsland'', someone dying usually happens OncePerEpisode. And when someone dies, all you need to do is just head on over to a recovery center and bring them back to life. BFDIA and IDFB usually parody the use of recovery centers and how characters are overly dependent on them, while in BFB there are no recovery centers and Four is used for this purpose.
* ''WebAnimation/InanimateInsanity'' doesn't feature death as often as BFDI, but the way characters are brought back to life just as easily is explained during season 2 by [=MePhone=] using an application within him to bring them back to life. This also justifies why Bow was KilledOffForReal, as [=MePhone=] had been killed at the moment when Bow died.

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