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* [[BadassBookworm Soren]] from ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Fire Emblem: Path of Radiance]]'' especially. His first response to finding [[EverythingsBetterWithPrincesses Princess Elincia]] is to suggest leaving her behind, and then handing her over to the invading armies because "It's none of our concern." By the next game, [[DefrostingIceQueen He Gets Better]].

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* [[BadassBookworm Soren]] from ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Fire Emblem: Path of Radiance]]'' ''VideoGame/FireEmblemPathOfRadiance'' especially. His first response to finding [[EverythingsBetterWithPrincesses Princess Elincia]] is to suggest leaving her behind, and then handing her over to the invading armies because "It's none of our concern." By the next game, [[DefrostingIceQueen He Gets Better]].


* While ''Anime/DragonBallZ'''s Vegeta isn't ''usually'' like this, he sits out the fight in ''Wrath of the Dragon'' until the villain crushes his house.

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* While ''Anime/DragonBallZ'''s Vegeta isn't ''usually'' like this, he sits out the fight in ''Wrath of the Dragon'' ''Anime/DragonBallZWrathOfTheDragon'' until the villain crushes his house.


* [[EnforcedTrope Enforced legally]] in ''Manga/MyHeroAcademia''. In a world where EveryoneIsASuper, only heroes with licenses are authorized to use their abilities to help people. Anybody else who does is either a villain or an unlawful vigilante, so most people seek to stay out of trouble.

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* [[EnforcedTrope Enforced legally]] in ''Manga/MyHeroAcademia''. In a world where EveryoneIsASuper, only heroes with licenses are authorized to use their abilities to help people. Anybody else who does is either a villain or an unlawful vigilante, so most people seek to stay out of trouble. Quite a few villains are ''incredibly'' bitter about this attitude, especially Tomura Shigaraki, who despite being a child destitute on the streets and clearly in need of help no one was willing...and the one that did was [[BigBad All for One]].


* In ''Theatre/UniversalsHorrorMakeUpShow'', during the OverlyLongGag of one of the hosts' "death", they lament how no one in the audience seems to care about them dying a horrible death.

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* In ''Theatre/UniversalsHorrorMakeUpShow'', Ride/UniversalStudios' ''[[Theatre/UniversalsHorrorMakeUpShow Horror Make-Up Show]]'', during the OverlyLongGag of one of the hosts' "death", they lament how no one in the audience seems to care about them dying a horrible death.


* Adam Appich from''Literature/TheOverstory'' is a cognitive psychologist who devotes his career to studying this, not that this stops him from having his own moments like when [[spoiler:his professor has a heart attack and he assumes it's AllPartOfTheShow.]]

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* Adam Appich from''Literature/TheOverstory'' from ''Literature/TheOverstory'' is a cognitive psychologist who devotes his career to studying this, not that this stops him from having his own moments like when [[spoiler:his professor has a heart attack and he assumes it's AllPartOfTheShow.]]

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* Adam Appich from''Literature/TheOverstory'' is a cognitive psychologist who devotes his career to studying this, not that this stops him from having his own moments like when [[spoiler:his professor has a heart attack and he assumes it's AllPartOfTheShow.]]

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* The Music/BlueOysterCult song ''Screams In The Night'' was written by keyboards player Allen Lanier. On perhaps his third night in New York, a woman was stabbed to death in the street beneath his apartment window. Lanier was struck by how many people just watched and did nothing - or seemed to. This may well have been the notorious [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murder_of_Kitty_Genovese Genovese murder]] which helped to define "bystander syndrome".


[[folder:Anime and Manga]]

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[[folder:Anime and & Manga]]


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[[folder:Roleplay]]
* ''Roleplay/DawnOfANewAgeOldportBlues'':
** Simon struggles with this mentality, being an anti-social person who'd rather leave others to deal with their own problems. When he realises that his teacher is a government agent charged with detaining superpowered people, he initially tries to distance himself from the problem, then berates himself for doing nothing whilst the other kids could be put in the danger. Ultimately he subverts the trope by warning the others of Travers' presence.
** Jessica, the resident {{Jerkass}}, can't be trusted to help out in a situation even when she's expected to. When Zia gets involved with a fight and looks to Jessica for help, she ignores Zia and scurries away.
[[/folder]]


Sadly, this trope is often TruthInTelevision, although the often-used, most famous example of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murder_of_Kitty_Genovese the murder of Kitty Genovese]] seems to have been 99% exaggeration and plain lies by the media. The story everyone's heard is that thirty-eight people just stood and watched as she was raped and slowly killed, and no-one even called the police. In fact, no one saw what was happening because it happened in a corridor, and several ''did'' call the police.[[note]]...who blew off the call, likely (at least in part) due to the fact that she was a known lesbian in an extremely unforgiving time. Massive reforms in police response followed. In fact, the Genovese case was a milestone that led to the institution of 911 as a national emergency response number a few years later.[[/note]] One of the callers had been asked to do so by a friend who said he "didn't want to get involved"[[note]]If you called the cops, they'd often just tell you to mind your own business, or possibly even arrest you for bothering them.[[/note]] and the subsequent ''New York Times'' account had ''everyone'' saying this. [[RightForTheWrongReasons Nevertheless, this incident sparked research into what turned out to be]] [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bystander_effect a real phenomenon]]. It does happen, leading to the advice evolving into: 1) "''Tell'' someone to help, directly"; or, 2) if you yourself are trying to help the person in trouble, specify who you're asking to help you help them, as people are much more prone to [[BavarianFireDrill following direct orders in an emergency situation]] than a directionless plea for aid. (If you don't know names, look at a bystander and say "Call 911!" or whatever.) It is also the reason why some countries, such as France or Finland, have a concept usually called "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duty_to_rescue Duty to Rescue]]" in their legal codes - if you see or come across someone who has been injured or is at risk of injury or death (say, trapped in a car after an accident), there are legal penalties available for those who do not render assistance.

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Sadly, this trope is often TruthInTelevision, although the often-used, most famous example of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murder_of_Kitty_Genovese the murder of Kitty Genovese]] seems to have been 99% exaggeration and plain lies by the media. The story everyone's heard is that thirty-eight people just stood and watched as she was raped and slowly killed, killed right before their eyes, and no-one no one even called the police. In fact, no one saw what was happening because it happened in a corridor, and several ''did'' call the police.[[note]]...who blew off the call, likely (at least in part) due to call. Most of the fact that callers had heard it, not seen it, and mistook it for a domestic quarrel or drunk arguing. Police rarely if ever responded to this type of conflict. Genovese was not identified by the callers, but if she had been, well, she was a known lesbian in an extremely unforgiving time. Massive out Lesbian and a barmaid, so... '''Massive''' reforms in police response followed. In fact, the Genovese case was a milestone that led to the institution of 911 as a national emergency response number a few years later.[[/note]] One of the callers had been asked to do so by a friend who said he "didn't want to get involved"[[note]]If involved"[[note]]The cops' indifference to domestic violence and assault calls cannot be overstressed here. If you called the cops, cops for anything less than, say, a bank robbery, they'd often just tell you to mind your own business, or possibly even arrest you ''you'' for bothering them.[[/note]] and the subsequent ''New York Times'' account had ''everyone'' saying this. [[RightForTheWrongReasons Nevertheless, this incident sparked research into what turned out to be]] [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bystander_effect a real phenomenon]]. It does happen, leading to the advice evolving into: 1) "''Tell'' someone to help, directly"; or, 2) if you yourself are trying to help the person in trouble, specify by name who you're asking to help you help them, as people are much more prone to [[BavarianFireDrill following direct orders in an emergency situation]] than a directionless plea for aid. (If you don't know names, look at a bystander and say "Call 911!" 911 now!" or whatever.) It is also the reason why some countries, such as France or Finland, have a concept usually called "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duty_to_rescue Duty to Rescue]]" in their legal codes - if you see or come across someone who has been injured or is at risk of injury or death (say, trapped in a car after an accident), there are legal penalties available for those who do not render assistance.


Somebody is begging for help -- but no [[BadassBystander help]] is forthcoming. As far as bystanders are concerned, it's somebody else's problem.

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Somebody is begging for help -- but no [[BadassBystander help]] is forthcoming. As far as bystanders are concerned, it's somebody else's problem.problem: either a hero will swoop in and save the day, or a ''different'' bystander, one who is far more qualified, will step up and do the job.


Sadly, this trope is often TruthInTelevision, although the often-used, most famous example of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murder_of_Kitty_Genovese the murder of Kitty Genovese]] seems to have been 99% exaggeration and plain lies by the media. The story everyone's heard is that thirty-eight people just stood and watched as she was raped and slowly killed, and no-one even called the police. In fact, no one saw what was happening because it happened in a corridor, and several ''did'' call the police.[[note]]...Who blew off the call. Massive reforms in police response followed. In fact, the Genovese case was a milestone that led to the institution of 911 as a national emergency response number a few years later.[[/note]] One of the callers had been asked to do so by a friend who said he "didn't want to get involved"[[note]]If you called the cops, they'd often just tell you to mind your own business, or possibly even arrest you for bothering them.[[/note]] and the subsequent ''New York Times'' account had ''everyone'' saying this. [[RightForTheWrongReasons Nevertheless, this incident sparked research into what turned out to be]] [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bystander_effect a real phenomenon]]. It does happen, leading to the advice evolving into: 1) "''Tell'' someone to help, directly"; or, 2) if you yourself are trying to help the person in trouble, specify who you're asking to help you help them, as people are much more prone to [[BavarianFireDrill following direct orders in an emergency situation]] than a directionless plea for aid. (If you don't know names, look at a bystander and say "Call 911!" or whatever.) It is also the reason why some countries, such as France or Finland, have a concept usually called "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duty_to_rescue Duty to Rescue]]" in their legal codes - if you see or come across someone who has been injured or is at risk of injury or death (say, trapped in a car after an accident), there are legal penalties available for those who do not render assistance.

to:

Sadly, this trope is often TruthInTelevision, although the often-used, most famous example of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murder_of_Kitty_Genovese the murder of Kitty Genovese]] seems to have been 99% exaggeration and plain lies by the media. The story everyone's heard is that thirty-eight people just stood and watched as she was raped and slowly killed, and no-one even called the police. In fact, no one saw what was happening because it happened in a corridor, and several ''did'' call the police.[[note]]...Who who blew off the call.call, likely (at least in part) due to the fact that she was a known lesbian in an extremely unforgiving time. Massive reforms in police response followed. In fact, the Genovese case was a milestone that led to the institution of 911 as a national emergency response number a few years later.[[/note]] One of the callers had been asked to do so by a friend who said he "didn't want to get involved"[[note]]If you called the cops, they'd often just tell you to mind your own business, or possibly even arrest you for bothering them.[[/note]] and the subsequent ''New York Times'' account had ''everyone'' saying this. [[RightForTheWrongReasons Nevertheless, this incident sparked research into what turned out to be]] [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bystander_effect a real phenomenon]]. It does happen, leading to the advice evolving into: 1) "''Tell'' someone to help, directly"; or, 2) if you yourself are trying to help the person in trouble, specify who you're asking to help you help them, as people are much more prone to [[BavarianFireDrill following direct orders in an emergency situation]] than a directionless plea for aid. (If you don't know names, look at a bystander and say "Call 911!" or whatever.) It is also the reason why some countries, such as France or Finland, have a concept usually called "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duty_to_rescue Duty to Rescue]]" in their legal codes - if you see or come across someone who has been injured or is at risk of injury or death (say, trapped in a car after an accident), there are legal penalties available for those who do not render assistance.

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* ''Film/TheWoman'': Brian's first scene has him witness some bullies beating up a little girl. After staring for a few seconds, he walks away to practice shooting a basketball into a hoop.

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* [[EnforcedTrope Enforced legally]] in ''Manga/MyHeroAcademia''. In a world where EveryoneIsASuper, only heroes with licenses are authorized to use their abilities to help people. Anybody else who does is either a villain or an unlawful vigilante, so most people seek to stay out of trouble.


** ''Film/{{Black Panther|2018}}'': N'Jobu and Killmonger accuse Wakanda of being this due to the country's isolationism. According to Killmonger, by refusing to aid its neighbors for the sake of preserving its secrecy, Wakanda has allowed its fellow Africans to suffer from colonialism, slavery, poverty, and racial segregation. This sentiment was similarly evoked by [[spoiler:his father]] N'Jobu who tried to arm African Americans with vibranium weapons.

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** ''Film/{{Black Panther|2018}}'': N'Jobu and Killmonger accuse Wakanda of being this due to the country's isolationism. According to Killmonger, by refusing to aid its neighbors for the sake of preserving its secrecy, Wakanda has allowed its fellow Africans to suffer from colonialism, slavery, poverty, and racial segregation. This sentiment was similarly evoked by [[spoiler:his father]] his father N'Jobu who [[spoiler:who tried to arm African Americans with vibranium weapons.weapons]].

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