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* ''Webcomic/KillSixBillionDemons:'' When our heroine Allison agrees to a drinking contest with a demon, she gets a glowing spot on her wrist. This calls forth this comment from a bystander:

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* ''Webcomic/KillSixBillionDemons:'' ''Webcomic/KillSixBillionDemons:''
** "Wielder of Names" starts with an explanation of how various species of intelligent beings were created. This turns out to be one angel talking to another. To the readers, it's partly new information (at least if they haven't read the additional material) and partly recap, but in-universe, it's a kind of "This is why the universe is corrupt and we must do something about it" speech.
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When our heroine Allison agrees to a drinking contest with a demon, she gets a glowing spot on her wrist. This calls forth this comment from a bystander: bystander (who probably doesn't believe she's who she says she is):


Not explaining anything sometimes results in the audience being too busy trying to figure out what's going on to enjoy the show, [[TropesAreTools using this trope is not always a bad thing]]. In serialized works or plays, "as you know" is seen as a convenient workaround to save time or to spare readers returning to the series. For example, it's easier to say "as you know, Dr. Moriarty is the most feared criminal mastermind in the world" than showing to new readers to the Sherlock Holmes series just what kind of criminal the doctor is. Or, it often would be more advantageous to a play's length to say "as you know, the Montagues and Capulets have been feuding for 50 years" than to show a fifty-year-long feud. Notwithstanding, there are less obvious workarounds in use in modern writing.

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Not explaining anything sometimes results in the audience being too busy trying to figure out what's going on to enjoy the show, [[TropesAreTools [[Administrivia/TropesAreTools using this trope is not always a bad thing]]. In serialized works or plays, "as you know" is seen as a convenient workaround to save time or to spare readers returning to the series. For example, it's easier to say "as you know, Dr. Moriarty is the most feared criminal mastermind in the world" than showing to new readers to the Sherlock Holmes series just what kind of criminal the doctor is. Or, it often would be more advantageous to a play's length to say "as you know, the Montagues and Capulets have been feuding for 50 years" than to show a fifty-year-long feud. Notwithstanding, there are less obvious workarounds in use in modern writing.

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* Mocked during John Byrne's run in ComicBook/SheHulk. Louise, who had been the 1940s heroine the Blonde Phantom is the only other person besides Jennifer who grasps she's in a comic book and talks to the readers. Before her secret is revealed, she goes to District Attorney Tower to hand some papers over.
-->'''Tower''': But...these are just about Stilt-Man's recent escape? You showed these to me this morning.
-->'''Louise''': Yes, but the readers weren't here for that. It's foreshadowing for the next issue. Have a nice night!
-->''(walks off as Tower just stares in utter confusion)''


* Lampshaded in ''WesternAnimation/{{Chowder}}''. After Chowder asks Mung several questions pertaining to the plot, Chowder asks him why he asks so many questions. Mung replies that it's the easiest way for [[BreakingTheFourthWall their loyal fanbase]] to learn about the episode's plot.

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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Chowder}}'': Lampshaded in ''WesternAnimation/{{Chowder}}''."The Belgian Waffle Slobber-Barker". After Chowder asks Mung several questions pertaining to the plot, Chowder asks him why he asks so many questions. Mung replies that it's the easiest way for [[BreakingTheFourthWall their loyal fanbase]] to learn about the episode's plot.


** This is also a rather standard occurrence in places with a 'spiral' school system. That is, every few years every subject comes back with a bit more detail and a bit more backgrounds and a bit different connections. As in: "We did tell you about this a few years ago. This is what we left out." Which will usually result in being told about any given subject multiple times, all but the first of them starting with a short re-introduction to the subject, frequently done in an 'as you know' style.

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** This is also a rather standard occurrence in places with a 'spiral' school system. That is, every few years every subject comes back with a bit more detail and a bit more backgrounds and a bit different connections. As in: "We did tell you about this a few years ago. This is what we left out." Which will usually result in being told about any given subject multiple times, all but the first of them starting with a short re-introduction to the subject, frequently done in an 'as you know' style. This is generally followed by explaining which parts of what you know were [[LiesToChildren simplifications]] that were good enough for the previous level but must now be unlearned.


* Inverted in Heinlein's ''Literature/StarshipTroopers''. It's used toward the reader as an excuse to skip exposition. Specifically, Rico's narration skips over a lot about the powered armor by telling the reader "But if you really are interested in the prints and stereos and schematics of a suit's physiology, you can find most of it, the unclassified part, in any fairly large public library." On the otherhand in the ActionPrologue their sergeant goes over the plan of attack even though it's been hypnotically implanted in the troopers, as "some of you don't have minds to hypnotise."

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* Inverted in Heinlein's ''Literature/StarshipTroopers''. It's used toward the reader as an excuse to skip exposition. Specifically, Rico's narration skips over a lot about the powered armor by telling the reader "But if you really are interested in the prints and stereos and schematics of a suit's physiology, you can find most of it, the unclassified part, in any fairly large public library." On the otherhand other hand in the ActionPrologue their sergeant goes over the plan of attack even though it's been hypnotically implanted in the troopers, as "some of you don't have minds to hypnotise."


* Inverted in Heinlein's ''Literature/StarshipTroopers''. It's used toward the reader as an excuse to skip exposition. Specifically, Rico's narration skips over a lot about the powered armor by telling the reader "But if you really are interested in the prints and stereos and schematics of a suit's physiology, you can find most of it, the unclassified part, in any fairly large public library."

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* Inverted in Heinlein's ''Literature/StarshipTroopers''. It's used toward the reader as an excuse to skip exposition. Specifically, Rico's narration skips over a lot about the powered armor by telling the reader "But if you really are interested in the prints and stereos and schematics of a suit's physiology, you can find most of it, the unclassified part, in any fairly large public library." On the otherhand in the ActionPrologue their sergeant goes over the plan of attack even though it's been hypnotically implanted in the troopers, as "some of you don't have minds to hypnotise."

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* Half of the exposition in ''WebVideo/RollerSamuraiVampireSlayers'' comes across as this.
--> '''Samantha:''' We're the Roller Samurai Vampire Slayers. We slay vampires. That's what we do.\\
'''Jake:''' Yeah. I know Samantha. I'm your partner.\\
'''Samantha:''' Oh, you're my partner? [[HypocriticalHumor Thanks for reminding me of that, fucking idiot!]]\\
'''Jake:''' ...right...

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* A very common thing with police interviews when they are recorded. Often the police will go through with the person of interest what they know and what has already happened several times so that there is a record of the police stating these have happened with the person of interest agreeing that they have.


* Lampshaded in one of ''Webcomic/DinosaurComics''' many AlternateUniverse panels;

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* Lampshaded in one of ''Webcomic/DinosaurComics''' many AlternateUniverse panels;panels:


** [[NightmareFuel Terrifyingly]] {{Subverted| trope}} in [[http://www.giantitp.com/comics/oots1139.html Strip 1139]], regarding how the world is supposed to contain the Snarl.

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** [[NightmareFuel Terrifyingly]] {{Subverted| {{subverted| trope}} in [[http://www.giantitp.com/comics/oots1139.html Strip 1139]], regarding how the world is supposed to contain the Snarl.


** [[NightmareFuel Terrifyingly]] Subverted in [[http://www.giantitp.com/comics/oots1139.html Strip 1139]], regarding how the world is supposed to contain the Snarl.

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** [[NightmareFuel Terrifyingly]] Subverted {{Subverted| trope}} in [[http://www.giantitp.com/comics/oots1139.html Strip 1139]], regarding how the world is supposed to contain the Snarl.

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* In ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil0'', Wesker and Birkin, who are both Umbrella scientists, feel the need while having a conversation to specify that the research into the T-Virus is almost complete and that the G-Virus is a more powerful strand of T, both things they would've already been perfectly aware of.


** It's also averted to tease the player. The Battle of Malachor V is a major part of the backstory for the Exile and several other characters, but ''since'' they all know exactly what happened (and it's a traumatic memory to most) they never make more than passing references and the player doesn't find out until just before the endgame [[spoiler:when circumstances force them to return and [[SceneryGorn see just what they did to the planet]]]]. There's also a lampshade when the Exile first meets Bao-Dur; while he and the Exile served together for years, and one of the dialogue options when he's first mentioned takes this into account, the ''player'' has never seen or heard of him before, so reacting as such leaves Bao-Dur rather bemused.

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** It's also averted to tease the player. The Battle of Malachor V is a major part of the backstory for the Exile and several other characters, but ''since'' they all know exactly what happened (and it's a traumatic memory to most) they never make more than passing references and the player doesn't find out until just before the endgame [[spoiler:when circumstances force them to return and [[SceneryGorn see just what they did to the planet]]]]. There's also a lampshade when the Exile first meets Bao-Dur; while he and the Exile served together for years, and one of the dialogue options when he's first mentioned takes this into account, the ''player'' has never seen or heard of him before, so reacting and you can also react as such such, which leaves Bao-Dur rather bemused.


** In the second game it's played with, as Atton and the player character are MrExposition back and forth to each other about the events of the first game, which the player can either agree with or correct and explain what really happened. This is used by Obsidian to avoid having to make use of an OldSaveBonus to maintain consistency with the somewhat customizable nature of the plot of the first game.

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** In the second game it's played with, as after escaping from the first planet, Atton and the player character are MrExposition back and forth to each other about the events of the first game, which the player can either agree with or correct and explain what really happened. This is used by Obsidian to avoid having to make use of an OldSaveBonus to maintain consistency with the somewhat customizable nature of the plot of the first game.



** It's also averted to tease the player. The Battle of Malachor V is a major part of the backstory for the Exile and several other characters, but ''since'' they all know exactly what happened (and it's a traumatic memory to most) they never make more than passing references and the player doesn't find out until just before the endgame. There's also a lampshade when the Exile first meets Bao-Dur; the player has never seen or heard of him before, which leaves him rather bemused since the characters served together for years.

to:

** It's also averted to tease the player. The Battle of Malachor V is a major part of the backstory for the Exile and several other characters, but ''since'' they all know exactly what happened (and it's a traumatic memory to most) they never make more than passing references and the player doesn't find out until just before the endgame. endgame [[spoiler:when circumstances force them to return and [[SceneryGorn see just what they did to the planet]]]]. There's also a lampshade when the Exile first meets Bao-Dur; while he and the player Exile served together for years, and one of the dialogue options when he's first mentioned takes this into account, the ''player'' has never seen or heard of him before, which so reacting as such leaves him Bao-Dur rather bemused since the characters served together for years.bemused.

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