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* Despite being an attorney Veda Scott didn't come out of the Wrestling/{{ROH}}\Wrestling/{{SHIMMER}} Academy this way, initially living up to the good sportsmanship standards of both promotions. Eventually her cowardly nature got the best of her, though, and she began to familiarize herself with all loopholes, legal or otherwise, to make her pro wrestling career easier.

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* Despite being an attorney Veda Scott didn't come out of the Wrestling/{{ROH}}\Wrestling/{{SHIMMER}} Wrestling/RingOfHonor[=\=]Wrestling/{{SHIMMER}} Academy this way, initially living up to the good sportsmanship standards of both promotions. Eventually her cowardly nature got the best of her, though, and she began to familiarize herself with all loopholes, legal or otherwise, to make her pro wrestling career easier.

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* Subverted in ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfKorra''. Flashbacks in Season One show the infamous mob boss and bloodbender Yakone being defended by a lawyer, but the man is a PunchClockVillain who's not shown engaging in any shady behavior and [[StrawmanHasAPoint rightly]] points out that the prosecution can't do anything to prove that his client can bloodbend at will aside from offering a few past instances of advanced benders.


* ''Film/{{Conspiracy}}'' has perhaps one of the worst examples. During the Wannsee Conference, during which the FinalSolution to the [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII Jewish question was devised]], several key participants were lawyers. Including members of the Justice Ministry. The most revolting one (who's also a lawyer) throws in an EvilLawyerJoke for good measure.

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* ''Film/{{Conspiracy}}'' ''Film/Conspiracy2001'' has perhaps one of the worst examples. During the Wannsee Conference, during which the FinalSolution to the [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII Jewish question was devised]], several key participants were lawyers. Including members of the Justice Ministry. The most revolting one (who's also a lawyer) throws in an EvilLawyerJoke for good measure.


In reality, attorneys are simply acting and arguing on behalf of their clients, and are ''supposed'' to be [[YouKeepUsingThatWord amoral (not immoral!)]] in their advocacy. An attorney is a true PunchClockVillain or PunchClockHero depending on who hires them. In fact, in some jurisdictions, like [[UsefulNotes/BritishCourts the UK]], advocates ''have no choice'' who they defend: if approached, it's professional misconduct not to accept a case within their professional competence. Criminal defense attorneys, in particular, are often very kind-hearted, civic-minded people who genuinely believe that even the worst members of society have a good reason for committing their crime, or that no matter how heinous the crime or obvious the guilt, the State must still prove it beyond a reasonable doubt--even if they understand perfectly well that their client is almost certainly guilty. Ideally, a strong defense of their client serves as an important check against false accusations, {{corrupt cop}}s, {{hanging judge}}s, {{kangaroo court}}s, and other forms of fast-but-unfair tyranny. Thus the defense attorney's arguments slow down the legal procedure for the sake of long-term accuracy. What an attorney should not be is ''unethical''. In trope terms, a good lawyer is (ideally) LawfulNeutral in practice and (dare we say it) LawfulGood in intention. In the wonderful world of fiction, however, SocialDarwinism is the name of the game. After all, it's not much of a "drama" if the opponent isn't [[VillainyFreeVillain villainous and unlikable]], is it?

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In reality, attorneys are simply acting and arguing on behalf of their clients, and are ''supposed'' to be [[YouKeepUsingThatWord amoral (not immoral!)]] in their advocacy. An attorney is a true PunchClockVillain or PunchClockHero depending on who hires them. In fact, in some jurisdictions, like [[UsefulNotes/BritishCourts the UK]], advocates ''have no choice'' who they defend: if approached, it's professional misconduct not to accept a case within their professional competence. Criminal defense attorneys, in particular, are often very kind-hearted, civic-minded people who genuinely believe that even the worst members of society have a good reason for committing their crime, or that no matter how heinous the crime or obvious the guilt, the State must still prove it beyond a reasonable doubt--even if they understand perfectly well that their client is almost certainly guilty. Ideally, a strong defense of their client serves as an important check against false accusations, {{corrupt {{dirty cop}}s, {{hanging judge}}s, {{kangaroo court}}s, and other forms of fast-but-unfair tyranny. Thus the defense attorney's arguments slow down the legal procedure for the sake of long-term accuracy. What an attorney should not be is ''unethical''. In trope terms, a good lawyer is (ideally) LawfulNeutral in practice and (dare we say it) LawfulGood in intention. In the wonderful world of fiction, however, SocialDarwinism is the name of the game. After all, it's not much of a "drama" if the opponent isn't [[VillainyFreeVillain villainous and unlikable]], is it?

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* In ''Series/ItsAlwaysSunnyInPhiladelphia'', The Gang's go-to lawyer is Charlie's [[CreepyUncle Uncle Jack]], a pedophile with an obsession with touching people and the size of his hands (to the point that he wears obvious giant gloves in court). Subverted with the lawyer that usually serves as their antagonist in court cases, who while obviously hating The Gang has [[VillainProtagonist very good reasons for doing so]] and is always competent without being crooked.

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** ''Series/TheGoodFight'' spinoff introduces [[Creator/MichaelSheen Roland Blum]], a Roy Cohn-like lawyer, who is fond of theatrics and underhanded tricks. He doesn't skimp on the f-word or racist and sexist terms, but he usually never underestimates his opponents and plays dirty. He states repeatedly that his goal isn't to prove that his side is right, it's to portray the other side as wrong. He ends up getting Maia fired by calling the cops on the drugs he gave her.

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* In ''Film/TheGhoul'', Professor Morlant's lawyer Broughton is one of the people trying to break into his tomb to steal the jewel.


-->You fight to defend the law at the expense of defending justice.
-->And at the expense of defending morality.
* In ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' fanfic ''FanFic/DirtySympathy'' [[VillainProtagonist Klavier and Apollo]] are one, half the time. While they do their part to find the truth and the people actually guilty put away, they [[FrameUp framed]] Daryan and Kristoph for crimes they didn't commit and manipulated the witnesses and defendants. Although this was part of a StrangersOnATrainPlotMurder to get Daryan, a DomesticAbuser [[spoiler:and DirtyCop]] and Kristoph, a BadBoss [[spoiler:AmoralAttorney and poisoner]] put away and prevent them from killing Klavier and Apollo. Which is ironic, seeing how Klavier was the first prosecutor in ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' to avert this trope.

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-->You fight to defend the law at the expense of defending justice.
-->And
justice.\\
And
at the expense of defending morality.
* In ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' fanfic ''FanFic/DirtySympathy'' [[VillainProtagonist Klavier and Apollo]] are one, half the time. While they do their part to find the truth and the people actually guilty put away, they [[FrameUp framed]] Daryan and Kristoph for crimes they didn't commit and manipulated the witnesses and defendants. Although this was part of a StrangersOnATrainPlotMurder to get Daryan, a DomesticAbuser who [[DomesticAbuse abused his wife]], [[spoiler:and DirtyCop]] and Kristoph, a BadBoss [[spoiler:AmoralAttorney and poisoner]] put away and prevent them from killing Klavier and Apollo. Which is ironic, seeing how Klavier was the first prosecutor in ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' to avert this trope.


* David Otunga, another attorney who didn't start out this way, although unlike Scott he was always immoral, he just didn't use his legal background to his advantage until pressed to do so by [[Wrestling/JohnLaurinaitis Johnny Ace]], who found Otunga more useful as a lawyer than an admittedly [[UnskilledButStrong one dimensional]] wrestler.

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* David Otunga, Wrestling/DavidOtunga, another attorney who didn't start out this way, although unlike Scott he was always immoral, he just didn't use his legal background to his advantage until pressed to do so by [[Wrestling/JohnLaurinaitis Johnny Ace]], who found Otunga more useful as a lawyer than an admittedly [[UnskilledButStrong one dimensional]] wrestler.


* ''Literature/JoePickett'': The completely consciousless Clay [=McCann=] in ''Free Fire''. He concocts a scheme that will allow him to murder four people who stand in the way of his latest money-making scheme and never stand trial for it. He later tells one of their friends that he shouldn't be upset at him as their murders were nothing personal, but just business.



* ''Series/JoePickett'': The completely consciousless Clay [=McCann=] in ''Free Fire''. He concocts a scheme that will allow him to murder four people who stand in the way of his latest money-making scheme and never stand trial for it. He later tells one of their friends that he shouldn't be upset at him as their murders were nothing personal, but just business.

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** The father of Emma Barnes, Taylor's ex-best friend and one of the GirlPosse who made Taylor's life hell, gets them completely off the hook and even ''rewarded'' for stuffing Taylor in a locker filled with [[{{Squick}} used and rotting feminine hygiene products]], feeding the trio's delusions that Taylor should just lay down and take the abuse and be punished if she doesn't.

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**** Not true under some circumstances. Plaintiffs can sue "John Doe" when there is evidence that multiple parties have acted in concert but the names of all parties are not known. It's a placeholder until such other persons become known.


* In ''Webcomics/{{Freefall}}'', [[http://freefall.purrsia.com/ff400/fv00372.htm they actually make Sam look better by contrast.]]

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* In ''Webcomics/{{Freefall}}'', ''Webcomic/{{Freefall}}'', [[http://freefall.purrsia.com/ff400/fv00372.htm they actually make Sam look better by contrast.]]

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* ''ComicBook/GreenLanterns'' introduces Singularity Jain, an alien/demon/living black hole who might be the most extreme version of this trope in existence. A very literally predatory defense attorney, she approaches people who have no where else to turn to, refusing payment and instead asking for a single favor. This favor inevitably ends up being something (usually murder) that drives her client even deeper into despair, until they lose hope completely. It's at this point that she ''eats them whole'', feeding on their despair and pain.

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* ''Series/JoePickett'': The completely consciousless Clay [=McCann=] in ''Free Fire''. He concocts a scheme that will allow him to murder four people who stand in the way of his latest money-making scheme and never stand trial for it. He later tells one of their friends that he shouldn't be upset at him as their murders were nothing personal, but just business.

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