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* DoubleConsciousness: The wild nature of a wolf vs. the tame, instinctual loyal nature of a dog. Since White Fang is the son of a wolf and a half-wolf dog, this also represents InTheBlood.

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* DoubleConsciousness: The wild nature of a wolf vs. the tame, instinctual instinctually loyal nature of a dog. Since White Fang is the son of a three-quarters wolf and a half-wolf one-quarter dog, this also represents InTheBlood.



* IWantMyBelovedToBeHappy: An owner-and-their-wolfdog example: in a drastic departure from the original ending, at the end of the 2018 version, [[spoiler:Weedon and Maggie set White Fang free in the Yukon rather than take him to California with them, as it became clear that he would miss his home too much.]]

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* IWantMyBelovedToBeHappy: An owner-and-their-wolfdog example: IWantMyBelovedToBeHappy:
** Subverted
in a drastic departure from the original ending, at novel -- Weedon Scott tries to free White Fang rather than take him home to California, but the end of dog refuses to leave him.
** Played straight in
the 2018 film version, [[spoiler:Weedon where Weedon and Maggie set White Fang free in the Yukon rather than take him to California with them, Yukon, as it became clear that he would miss his home too much.]]



* KickTheSonOfABitch: White Fang kills Lip Lip during a famine. While it is meant to show that the dogs are killing and eating each other in their desperation to survive, it's hard to feel any sympathy at all for Lip Lip.

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* KickTheSonOfABitch: White Fang kills Lip Lip a weakened Lip-Lip during a famine. While it is meant to show that even the dogs are killing and eating each other in their desperation resorting to desperate measures to survive, it's hard to feel any sympathy at all sorry for Lip Lip.Lip-Lip.


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* UndyingLoyalty: How White Fang's dog nature manifests. He has to have a "god," and while he respects Grey Beaver and tolerates Beauty Smith, his love for Weedon Scott forges a bond so intense that he'd rather die than be separated from him.

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* DueToTheDead: The wolf-pursued men in the opening chapters are hauling the body of "Lord Alfred" -- presumably an upper-class person who decided to try his luck in Alaska. Even though they could perhaps have sacrificed his corpse to save themselves, they never even think of opening his casket, and the last living man even suspends his box in a tree so the wolves can't get him.

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* SceneryPorn: The many incredible views of Alaska in the 1991 adaptation, sumptuously shot in both winter and summer. Particularly stunning is the young White Fang running through a glistening ice cave, and Jack's father's claim nestled in mountainous forestland overlooking lakes and rivers.


The novel was adapted to a namesake film in 1991, directed by Randal Kleiser. The film cast a real wolfdog, Jed[[note]]incidentally, the same dog who played the initial Thing in ''Film/TheThing''![[/note]], into the role, with Creator/EthanHawke cast as his beloved master Jack Conroy. It also spawned a sequel, "White Fang 2: Myth of the White Wolf" (1994). This one briefly featured Hawke. but the main human characters were Henry Casey (Scott Bairstow) and Lily Joseph (Charmaine Craig).

to:

The novel was adapted to a namesake film in 1991, directed by Randal Kleiser. The film cast a real wolfdog, Jed[[note]]incidentally, the same dog who played the initial Thing in ''Film/TheThing''![[/note]], ''Film/TheThing1982''![[/note]], into the role, with Creator/EthanHawke cast as his beloved master Jack Conroy. It also spawned a sequel, "White Fang 2: Myth of the White Wolf" (1994). This one briefly featured Hawke. but the main human characters were Henry Casey (Scott Bairstow) and Lily Joseph (Charmaine Craig).


The novel was adapted to a namesake film in 1991, directed by Randal Kleiser. The film cast a real wolfdog, Jed, into the role, with Creator/EthanHawke cast as his beloved master Jack Conroy. It also spawned a sequel, "White Fang 2: Myth of the White Wolf" (1994). This one briefly featured Hawke. but the main human characters were Henry Casey (Scott Bairstow) and Lily Joseph (Charmaine Craig).

to:

The novel was adapted to a namesake film in 1991, directed by Randal Kleiser. The film cast a real wolfdog, Jed, Jed[[note]]incidentally, the same dog who played the initial Thing in ''Film/TheThing''![[/note]], into the role, with Creator/EthanHawke cast as his beloved master Jack Conroy. It also spawned a sequel, "White Fang 2: Myth of the White Wolf" (1994). This one briefly featured Hawke. but the main human characters were Henry Casey (Scott Bairstow) and Lily Joseph (Charmaine Craig).


** The animated series make Gray Beaver into a MagicalNativeAmerican. For starters.


** Lynxes are portrayed as the ultimate fighters that appear in the book. While lynxes are indeed fierce, it's really overblown. When White Fang is in a fighting ring, the day he fights a lynx is claimed as the day he truly fought for his life, despite that he had fought numerous wolves and dogs, including three in a row and two at a time, before the lynx. Dogs used in the gold rush tended to be very big, AT LEAST 80-100 pounds, and a lynx only weighs about 40 pounds. It's even worse with Kiche's fight at the beginning of the book. She is portrayed as fierce as a wolf can be and only seems to beat the mother lynx because baby WF was holding onto the cat's back leg with his teeth and is still seriously injured. Dogs have been used/known to hunt/kill all manner of animals and at one point in America, were the number one cause of unnatural deaths of domestic cats.
*** The animal that comes closest to killing White Fang is a ''bulldog.'' This might seem like another example, but it's actually an aversion since the bulldogs of old were athletic, powerful animals more akin to what would be considered modern-day pit bulls or mastiffs (the original bulldog type is best represented by the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Bulldog American Bulldog]] and the deliberate revivals of the old breed such as the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leavitt_Bulldog Leavitt Bulldog]] and the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olde_English_Bulldogge Olde English Bulldogge,]] while the old breed became the more familiar [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bulldog English Bulldog,]] a sedentary breed notorious for numerous health problems). The original bulldogs might have actually had a chance of besting a wolf in a fight.
*** Actually very much truth in television. Lynxes are specialised to take proportionally larger prey (ambush predators vs the cursorial predator that the wolf is) and being considerably larger and more robustly built than domestic cats they do pose a threat to individual wolves, much in the same way golden eagles do.


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* TruthInTelevision:
** The animal that comes closest to killing White Fang is a ''bulldog.'' This might seem surprising, but the bulldogs of old were athletic, powerful animals more akin to what would be considered modern-day pit bulls or mastiffs (the original bulldog type is best represented by the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Bulldog American Bulldog]] and the deliberate revivals of the old breed such as the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leavitt_Bulldog Leavitt Bulldog]] and the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olde_English_Bulldogge Olde English Bulldogge,]] while the old breed became the more familiar [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bulldog English Bulldog,]] a sedentary breed notorious for numerous health problems). The original bulldogs might have actually had a chance of besting a wolf in a fight.
** When White Fang is in a fighting ring, the day he fights a lynx is claimed as the day he truly fought for his life, despite that he had fought numerous wolves and dogs, including three in a row and two at a time, before the lynx. Lynxes are specialised to take proportionally larger prey (ambush predators vs the cursorial predator that the wolf is) and being considerably larger and more robustly built than domestic cats they do pose a threat to individual wolves, much in the same way golden eagles do.

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*** The animated series don't seem to even have that before going to the [[AGirlAndHerX A Girl and her Dog]] format (although some book characters remain important to the plot), aside from the girl making a few references to her father saving Fang's life.


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** The animated series make Gray Beaver into a MagicalNativeAmerican. For starters.


* AdaptationalAttractiveness: In the novel, Beauty Smith is a small ugly guy with a heart equally dark. In the 1991 Disney movie, his name holds more water since he's rather fair-looking.



* BabiesEverAfter: The book ends with White Fang meeting his pups for the first time.

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* BabiesEverAfter: The book ends with White Fang and Collie having puppies, the former meeting his pups for the first time.



* BabiesEverAfter: White Fang and Collie have puppies in the end.

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[[quoteright:322:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/white_fang_3.jpg]]


** The 1993-1994 television series. The first episode is roughly based on the end of the book, where White Fang learns to not attack the chickens and defends the family from an intruder, but it takes place in the 1990s, and after that the rest of the series is a ABoyAndHisDog series with typical sitcom plots unrelated to the book.

to:

** The 1993-1994 television series. The first episode is roughly based on the end of the book, where White Fang learns to not attack the chickens and defends the family from an intruder, but it takes place in the 1990s, and after that the rest of the series is a ABoyAndHisDog [[ABoyAndHisX A Boy and his Dog]] series with typical sitcom plots unrelated to the book.


* AdaptationalAlternateEnding: In the 2018 film, Weedon and Maggie let White Fang go free rather than bringing him to California with them.



* ArtisticLicenceBiology: It's stated that no male wolf will ever fight a female wolf or dog, even if attacked by one. This is completely untrue of real wolves (although the alpha female is more likely to have the last word in a dispute than her mate). Then there are inaccuracies in wolf pack structure, hunting, mating behavior, etc. Most notably, White Fang's father, One-Eye, kills two rival males to mate with Kiche; in real life, wolves rarely fight to the death, and really problematic "betas" typically leave to found their own packs. Killing mostly happens when a bunch of unrelated wolves are thrown together in a confined space like a zoo. And when White Fang meets Kiche as an adult, she drives him away as a potential threat to her current pups, and it's said that wolf mothers don't remember their own pups after a year; in reality, pups tend to stay with their parents for years and baby-sit their younger siblings. In fact, most packs consist of one mated pair and their offspring.
** Lynxes are portrayed as the ultimate fighters that appear in the book. While lynxes are indeed fierce, it's really overblown. When White Fang is in a fighting ring, the day he fights a lynx is claimed as the day he truly fought for his life, despite that he had fought numerous wolves and dogs, including three in a row and two at a time, before the lynx. Dogs used in the gold rush tended to be very big, AT LEAST 80-100 pounds, and a lynx only weighs about 40 pounds. It's even worse with Kiche's fight at the beginning of the book. She is portrayed as fierce as a wolf can be and only seems to beat the mother lynx because baby WF was holding onto the cat's back leg with his teeth and is still seriously injuried. Dogs have been used/known to hunt/kill all manner of animals and at one point in America, were the number one cause of unnatural deaths of domestic cats.

to:

* ArtisticLicenceBiology: It's stated that no male wolf will ever fight a female wolf or dog, even if attacked by one. This is completely untrue of real wolves (although the alpha female is more likely to have the last word in a dispute than her mate). Then there are inaccuracies in wolf pack structure, hunting, mating behavior, etc. Most notably, White Fang's father, One-Eye, kills two rival males to mate with Kiche; in real life, wolves rarely fight to the death, and really problematic "betas" subordinate wolves typically leave to found their own packs. Killing mostly happens when a bunch of unrelated wolves are thrown together in a confined space like a zoo. And when White Fang meets Kiche as an adult, she drives him away as a potential threat to her current pups, and it's said that wolf mothers don't remember their own pups after a year; in reality, pups tend to stay with their parents for years and baby-sit their younger siblings. In fact, most packs consist of one mated pair and their offspring.
** Lynxes are portrayed as the ultimate fighters that appear in the book. While lynxes are indeed fierce, it's really overblown. When White Fang is in a fighting ring, the day he fights a lynx is claimed as the day he truly fought for his life, despite that he had fought numerous wolves and dogs, including three in a row and two at a time, before the lynx. Dogs used in the gold rush tended to be very big, AT LEAST 80-100 pounds, and a lynx only weighs about 40 pounds. It's even worse with Kiche's fight at the beginning of the book. She is portrayed as fierce as a wolf can be and only seems to beat the mother lynx because baby WF was holding onto the cat's back leg with his teeth and is still seriously injuried.injured. Dogs have been used/known to hunt/kill all manner of animals and at one point in America, were the number one cause of unnatural deaths of domestic cats.



* InNameOnly: [[http://www.anime-games.co.uk/VHS/anime/white-fang-hashire-shiroi-okami.php A completely unrelated Japanese OVA "Hashire! Shiroi Okami" (Run! White Wolf) was dubbed into English]] [[CoversAlwaysLie with the packaging claiming it to be "Based on characters from Jack London's classic novel"]] but the content, bar several character names, bore no relation to the supposed source.

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* InNameOnly: InNameOnly:
**
[[http://www.anime-games.co.uk/VHS/anime/white-fang-hashire-shiroi-okami.php A completely unrelated Japanese OVA "Hashire! Shiroi Okami" (Run! White Wolf) was dubbed into English]] [[CoversAlwaysLie with the packaging claiming it to be "Based on characters from Jack London's classic novel"]] but the content, bar several character names, bore no relation to the supposed source.source.
** The 1993-1994 television series. The first episode is roughly based on the end of the book, where White Fang learns to not attack the chickens and defends the family from an intruder, but it takes place in the 1990s, and after that the rest of the series is a ABoyAndHisDog series with typical sitcom plots unrelated to the book.



* [[KidsAreCruel Puppies Are Cruel]]: Seriously.

to:

* [[KidsAreCruel Puppies Are Cruel]]: Seriously.KidsAreCruel: The puppy form of this occurs with Lip-Lip and the puppy pack.
* LighterAndSofter: The 2018 film. Gray Beaver is a much kinder owner and refers to White Fang as a friend, and instead of losing his money on alcohol, he tries to save his people’s land by selling mittens, and is initially successful before being robbed. White Fang always tries to be loyal, and comes around much faster to Weedon Scott, partly because White Fang was mainly afraid of his cane due to Smith’s club, and partly because Scott had once fed him as a pup and they suddenly recognized each other.



* [[BabiesEverAfter Puppies Ever After]]
* [[PutOnABus Put On A Canoe]]: Kiche, though she makes a brief Cameo later.

to:

* [[BabiesEverAfter Puppies Ever After]]
BabiesEverAfter: White Fang and Collie have puppies in the end.
* [[PutOnABus Put On A Canoe]]: PutOnABus: Kiche, though she makes a brief Cameo cameo later.



* {{Xenofiction}}

to:

* {{Xenofiction}}
{{Xenofiction}}: The book is told through White Fang’s point of view.


*** The animal that comes closest to killing White Fang is a ''bulldog.'' This might seem like another example, but it's actually an aversion since the bulldogs of old were athletic, powerful animals (the original bulldog type is best represented by the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Bulldog American Bulldog]] and the deliberate revivals of the old breed such as the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leavitt_Bulldog Leavitt Bulldog]] and the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olde_English_Bulldogge Olde English Bulldogge,]] while the old breed became the more familiar [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bulldog English Bulldog,]] a sedentary breed notorious for numerous health problems). The original bulldogs might have actually had a chance of besting a wolf in a fight.

to:

*** The animal that comes closest to killing White Fang is a ''bulldog.'' This might seem like another example, but it's actually an aversion since the bulldogs of old were athletic, powerful animals more akin to what would be considered modern-day pit bulls or mastiffs (the original bulldog type is best represented by the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Bulldog American Bulldog]] and the deliberate revivals of the old breed such as the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leavitt_Bulldog Leavitt Bulldog]] and the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olde_English_Bulldogge Olde English Bulldogge,]] while the old breed became the more familiar [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bulldog English Bulldog,]] a sedentary breed notorious for numerous health problems). The original bulldogs might have actually had a chance of besting a wolf in a fight.

Added DiffLines:

* IWantMyBelovedToBeHappy: An owner-and-their-wolfdog example: in a drastic departure from the original ending, at the end of the 2018 version, [[spoiler:Weedon and Maggie set White Fang free in the Yukon rather than take him to California with them, as it became clear that he would miss his home too much.]]


There was a television series based on the novel between 1993 and 1994. Not related to the films above, though probably inspired by the success of the first one. It lasted a single season, 26 episodes. All episodes are available on DVD. There was also an AnimatedAdaptation between 1992 and 1994, The Legend of White Fang, that was heavily [[{{Bowdlerization}} bowdlerized]] to make it suitable for children. A 2018 French-English animated film version (starring Nick Offerman and Rashida Jones) was made widely-available on [[Netflix.]]

to:

There was a television series based on the novel between 1993 and 1994. Not related to the films above, though probably inspired by the success of the first one. It lasted a single season, 26 episodes. All episodes are available on DVD. There was also an AnimatedAdaptation between 1992 and 1994, The Legend of White Fang, that was heavily [[{{Bowdlerization}} bowdlerized]] to make it suitable for children. A 2018 French-English animated film version (starring Nick Offerman and Rashida Jones) was made widely-available on [[Netflix.]]Netflix.

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