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* KarmaHoudini: An ambiguous example; [[spoiler: Sir Charles]] escapes at the end, and Poirot makes no move to stop him, but remarks that there's really no escape for him and all he can really do is "choose his exit", with the implication being that he's either going to kill himself off-page or will be apprehended, and even if he doesn't he's been exposed and ruined.

to:

* KarmaHoudini: An ambiguous example; [[spoiler: Sir Charles]] escapes flees at the end, and Poirot makes no move to stop him, but remarks that there's really no escape for him and all he can really do is "choose his exit", with the implication being that he's either going to kill himself off-page or will be apprehended, and even if he doesn't he's been exposed and ruined.


++Led by Sir Charles, our amateur detectives assume that Dr. Strange was killed because he knew the truth about the first murder, was obviously about to test his theory out on the same batch of houseguests, and thus had to be silenced in a hurry. [[spoiler:This turns out to be a RedHerring, as the doctor knows nothing about the first murder... but he ''is'' killed because he knows a secret that the killer wishes to hide.]]

to:

++Led **Led by Sir Charles, our amateur detectives assume that Dr. Strange was killed because he knew the truth about the first murder, was obviously about to test his theory out on the same batch of houseguests, and thus had to be silenced in a hurry. [[spoiler:This turns out to be a RedHerring, as the doctor knows nothing about the first murder... but he ''is'' killed because he knows a secret that the killer wishes to hide.]]


Added DiffLines:

* KarmaHoudini: An ambiguous example; [[spoiler: Sir Charles]] escapes at the end, and Poirot makes no move to stop him, but remarks that there's really no escape for him and all he can really do is "choose his exit", with the implication being that he's either going to kill himself off-page or will be apprehended, and even if he doesn't he's been exposed and ruined.

Added DiffLines:

* TrialRunCrime: [[spoiler:Babbington dies entirely at random so the killer can practice his method of poisoning and cleaning up the evidence in the confusion.]]


** Prior to her death, the third victim sent a telegram to the sleuths, telling them that she knows something about the murder case. However, she was killed before anyone could find out what she kew. [[spoiler:This was a rare case of [[InvertedTrope inversion of the trope]]. The note was a false clue sent by the killer to confuse the detectives, and the victim was actually killed to prevent the others from finding out that she actually knows ''nothing''.]]

to:

** Prior to her death, the third victim sent a telegram to the sleuths, telling them that she knows something about the murder case. However, she was killed before anyone could find out what she kew.knew. [[spoiler:This was a rare case of [[InvertedTrope inversion of the trope]]. The note was a false clue sent by the killer to confuse the detectives, and the victim was actually killed to prevent the others from finding out that she actually knows ''nothing''.]]


* WhoMurderedTheAsshole: Inverted. Both the first two victims are very nice people whom practically everyone likes, the third isn't known to any of the main cast at all, and so trying to figure out the murder motive is the main stumbling block to the investigation. There's even more to it: as it turns out in the end, the killer didn't hold any grudge whatsoever against the victims either.

to:

* WhoMurderedTheAsshole: Inverted. Both the first two victims are very nice people whom practically everyone likes, the third isn't known to any of the main cast at all, and so trying to figure out the murder motive is the main stumbling block to the investigation. There's even more to it: as it turns out in the end, the [[spoiler:the killer didn't hold any grudge whatsoever against the victims either.]]


* WhoMurderedTheAsshole: Inverted. Both the first two victims are very nice people whom practically everyone likes, the third isn't known to any of the main cast at all, and so trying to figure out the murder motive is the main stumbling block to the investigation.

to:

* WhoMurderedTheAsshole: Inverted. Both the first two victims are very nice people whom practically everyone likes, the third isn't known to any of the main cast at all, and so trying to figure out the murder motive is the main stumbling block to the investigation. There's even more to it: as it turns out in the end, the killer didn't hold any grudge whatsoever against the victims either.


* SettingUpdate: Similarly to ''[[Literature/LordEdgwareDies Thirteen At Dinner]]'', the time period of this film is updated to the 80s. Also, the location is changed to Acapulco, Mexico; while it's heyday as Hollywood's getaway of choice was in the 1950's, in the 1980's it was still seen as a glamorous destination - the sort of place an American movie star might retire to.

to:

* SettingUpdate: Similarly to ''[[Literature/LordEdgwareDies Thirteen At Dinner]]'', the time period of this film is updated to the 80s. Also, the location is changed to Acapulco, Mexico; while it's its heyday as Hollywood's getaway of choice was in the 1950's, 1950s, in the 1980's 1980s it was still seen as a glamorous destination - the sort of place an American movie star might retire to.


* MysteryMagnet: Discussed by the characters in the first chapter, in reference to the way Poirot has of stumbling into murders. Sir Bartholomew has a theory that events come to people, not people to events -- a man may travel all over the world and just barely miss anything bizarre going on, while another man may live in a London suburb and [[WeirdnessMagnet find himself caught up in all sorts of intrigues]]. "In the same way, men like your Hercule Poirot don't have to look for crime; it comes to them."



* WindowsOfTheSoul: Mr Satterthwaite wonders how Muriel Wills could write the plays credited to Anthony Astor, until he makes eye contact with her and is alarmed by the keenness and intelligence of her gaze. It feels to him as though Miss Wills were painstakingly learning him by heart.

to:

* WindowsOfTheSoul: Mr Satterthwaite wonders how Muriel Wills could write the plays credited to Anthony Astor, until he makes eye contact with her and is alarmed by the keenness and intelligence of her gaze. It feels to him as "as though Miss Wills were painstakingly learning him by heart.
heart."


Renowned actor Sir Charles Cartwright has rather improbably retired to the small, nondescript Cornish fishing village of Loomouth. As the novel opens, he is hosting a house-party of thirteen people, a mixture of local and London friends including Poirot and Satterthwaite. No sooner are the initial cocktails served than one of the guests, the local Vicar Stephen Babbington, suddenly falls down dead. Despite Sir Charles' suspicions of foul play--which his friends dismiss as a quite natural hankering after melodrama--and given that Babbington was an elderly man in poor health (not to mention the absolute absence of any motive for killing a kindly old village clergyman) the death is officially recorded as "natural causes".

to:

Renowned actor Sir Charles Cartwright has rather improbably retired to the small, nondescript Cornish fishing village of Loomouth. As the novel opens, he is hosting a house-party of thirteen people, a mixture of local and London friends including Poirot and Satterthwaite. No sooner are the initial cocktails served than one of the guests, the local Vicar Stephen Babbington, suddenly falls down dead. Despite Sir Charles' suspicions of foul play--which his friends dismiss as a quite natural hankering after melodrama--and given that Babbington was an elderly man in poor health (not to mention the absolute absence of any motive for killing a kindly old village clergyman) and with no enemies, the death is officially recorded as "natural causes".


* MayDecemberRomance: Charles Cartwright, 55, is in love with Egg, 25, though he fears that she prefers her old friend Oliver Manders, who is much closer to her age. Egg, on her part, hero worships Sir Charles and happily accepts his attentions.

to:

* MayDecemberRomance: Charles Cartwright, 55, is in love with Egg, 25, though he fears that she prefers her old friend Oliver Manders, who is much closer to her age. Egg, on her part, hero worships Sir Charles and happily accepts his attentions. [[spoiler: Not knowing that he has murdered three people to secure their marriage certainly helps.]]


** Prior to her death, the third victim sent a telegram to the sleuths, telling them that she knows something about the murder case. However, she was killed before anyone could find out what she kew. [[spoiler:This was also a red herring. The note was a false clue sent by the killer to confuse the detectives, and the victim was actually killed to prevent the others from finding out that she actually knows ''nothing''.]]

to:

** Prior to her death, the third victim sent a telegram to the sleuths, telling them that she knows something about the murder case. However, she was killed before anyone could find out what she kew. [[spoiler:This was also a red herring.rare case of [[InvertedTrope inversion of the trope]]. The note was a false clue sent by the killer to confuse the detectives, and the victim was actually killed to prevent the others from finding out that she actually knows ''nothing''.]]


* SettingUpdate: Similarly to ''[[Literature/LordEdgwareDies Thirteen At Dinner]]'', the time period of this film is updated to the 80s.

to:

* SettingUpdate: Similarly to ''[[Literature/LordEdgwareDies Thirteen At Dinner]]'', the time period of this film is updated to the 80s. Also, the location is changed to Acapulco, Mexico; while it's heyday as Hollywood's getaway of choice was in the 1950's, in the 1980's it was still seen as a glamorous destination - the sort of place an American movie star might retire to.



to:

* WindowsOfTheSoul: Mr Satterthwaite wonders how Muriel Wills could write the plays credited to Anthony Astor, until he makes eye contact with her and is alarmed by the keenness and intelligence of her gaze. It feels to him as though Miss Wills were painstakingly learning him by heart.


Renowned actor Sir Charles Cartwright has rather improbably retired to the small, nondescript Cornish fishing village of Loomouth. As the novel opens, he is hosting a house-party of thirteen people, a mixture of local and London friends including Poirot and Satterthwaite. No sooner are the initial cocktails served than one of the guests, the local Vicar Stephen Babbington, suddenly falls down dead. Despite Sir Charles' suspicions of foul play--which his friends dismiss as a quite natural hankering after melodrama--and given that Babbington was an elderly man in poor health (not to mention the absolute absence of any motive for killing a kindly old village clergyman) the death is officially recorded as as "natural causes".

to:

Renowned actor Sir Charles Cartwright has rather improbably retired to the small, nondescript Cornish fishing village of Loomouth. As the novel opens, he is hosting a house-party of thirteen people, a mixture of local and London friends including Poirot and Satterthwaite. No sooner are the initial cocktails served than one of the guests, the local Vicar Stephen Babbington, suddenly falls down dead. Despite Sir Charles' suspicions of foul play--which his friends dismiss as a quite natural hankering after melodrama--and given that Babbington was an elderly man in poor health (not to mention the absolute absence of any motive for killing a kindly old village clergyman) the death is officially recorded as as "natural causes".


** Led by Sir Charles, our amateur detectives assume that Dr. Strange was killed because he knew the truth about the first murder, was obviously about to test his theory out on the same batch of houseguests, and thus had to be silenced in a hurry. [[spoiler:This turns out to be a RedHerring, as the doctor knows nothing about the first murder... but he ''is'' killed because he knows a secret that the killer wishes to hide.]]

to:

** Led ++Led by Sir Charles, our amateur detectives assume that Dr. Strange was killed because he knew the truth about the first murder, was obviously about to test his theory out on the same batch of houseguests, and thus had to be silenced in a hurry. [[spoiler:This turns out to be a RedHerring, as the doctor knows nothing about the first murder... but he ''is'' killed because he knows a secret that the killer wishes to hide.]]



* LoveMakesYouEvil: [[spoiler:Sir Charles wants to marry Egg, but is unable to do so because he can't divorce his first wife, since she's certifiably insane. In order to get around this, he murders his childhood friend Tollie Strange because he's the only person who knew of his first marriage.]]

to:

* LoveMakesYouEvil: [[spoiler:Sir [[spoiler: In the original ending. Sir Charles wants to marry Egg, but is unable to do so because he can't divorce his first wife, since she's certifiably insane. In order to get around this, he murders his childhood friend Tollie Strange because he's the only person who knew of his first marriage.]]

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