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* MurderTheHypotenuse: Beatrice Taussig quickly agrees to go along with the plan to [[spoiler:kidnap Al Gregory]], seeing it as a means to remove her rival for [[spoiler:Candi's]] affections. Unlike most examples of this trope, however, Bea actually display's genuine concern for [[spoiler:Al's]] well being, not wanting him dead but merely out of the way.



* MurderTheHypotenuse: Beatrice Taussig quickly agrees to go along with the plan to [[spoiler:kidnap Al Gregory]], seeing it as a means to remove her rival for [[spoiler:Candi's]] affections. Unlike most examples of this trope, however, Bea actually display's genuine concern for [[spoiler:Al's]] well being, not wanting him dead but merely out of the way.



* {{Room101}}: The KGB's interrogation unit, particularly the sensory deprivation tank.



* SpySpeak: Examples of sign/countersign are seen throughout the novel, most notably when Tania makes contact with [[spoiler:the kidnap team.]] Clark also uses coded terms when communicating with ''Dallas'', such as "The sun is out!" and the "The sun is rising!" indicating he's been spotted and is being pursued.



* TortureAlwaysWorks: KGB torture techniques are shown in great detail, and rarely do they involve physical abuse. One captured agent breaks from sensory deprivation, and another from sleep deprivation and psychological deception.

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* TortureAlwaysWorks: KGB torture techniques are shown in great detail, and rarely do they involve physical abuse. One captured agent breaks from sensory deprivation, and another from sleep deprivation and psychological deception. Also discussed - the KGB is said to have developed such methods precisely because conventional torture tends to yield unreliable information.


** Agent CASSIUS, a Soviet mole, makes his chronologically final appearance in the series. [[spoiler:Here, he acts as a double agent, having been caught and turned in ''The Hunt for Red October.''

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** Agent CASSIUS, a Soviet mole, makes his chronologically final appearance in the series. [[spoiler:Here, he acts as a double agent, having been caught and turned in ''The Hunt for Red October.'''']]



* ComfortingTheWidow: Beatrice Taussig makes a clumsy attempt at this with Candi after Al Gregory's kidnapping. It ends so disastrously that she blows her cover.

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* ComfortingTheWidow: Beatrice Taussig makes a clumsy attempt at this with Candi [[spoiler:Candi after Al Gregory's kidnapping.kidnapping]]. It ends so disastrously that she blows her cover.



** Also played with where Beatrice Taussig is concerned. Bea's KGB handler is secretly repulsed by her agent's sexual preferences - to say nothing of being afraid Bea's affections may one day be turned on ''her'' - but maintains an accepting facade, not wanting to push her asset away. Similarly, when an FBI agent investigating the leak in the Tea Clipper program suspects Taussig might be a lesbian, her name is moved to the top of the list of potential suspects... but when surveillance doesn't pick up any signs of espionage activity, she's ruled out just as quickly as everyone else.



* MakeItLookLikeAnAccident: Altunin's death, by genuine misadventure, is assumed to be this by the Russian authorities.



* MakeItLookLikeAnAccident: Altunin's death, by genuine misadventure, is assumed to be this by the Russian authorities.

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* MakeItLookLikeAnAccident: Altunin's death, by MurderTheHypotenuse: Beatrice Taussig quickly agrees to go along with the plan to [[spoiler:kidnap Al Gregory]], seeing it as a means to remove her rival for [[spoiler:Candi's]] affections. Unlike most examples of this trope, however, Bea actually display's genuine misadventure, is assumed to be this by concern for [[spoiler:Al's]] well being, not wanting him dead but merely out of the Russian authorities.way.


* CodeName: CARDINAL.

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* CodeName: CARDINAL.As a spy novel, plenty appear.
**CARDINAL, naturally. The CIA's most highly placed mole in the Soviet Union, and one who has been operating for an incredible thirty years.
** Agent CASSIUS, a Soviet mole, makes his chronologically final appearance in the series. [[spoiler:Here, he acts as a double agent, having been caught and turned in ''The Hunt for Red October.''
** Tea Clipper and Bright Star are the code names for the American and Soviet SDI research programs, respectively.
** When radioing ''Dallas'', Clark refers to himself as Willy and the sub as Uncle Joe.
** The Cobra Belle missile and satellite surveillance aircraft, a (fictional) 767-based version of the real life Cobra Ball. The Cobra Dane radar system is also briefly mentioned.


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* ComfortingTheWidow: Beatrice Taussig makes a clumsy attempt at this with Candi after Al Gregory's kidnapping. It ends so disastrously that she blows her cover.


* IDidWhatIHadToDo: The Major acknowledges getting some of his own people killed while serving as a ReverseMole and shows some guilt about it but is also confident it helped establish his cover.

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* IDidWhatIHadToDo: The Major acknowledges getting some of his own people killed while serving as [[TheMole a ReverseMole mole]] and shows some guilt about it but is also confident it helped establish his cover.


* TheAtoner: Altunin helps the spy ring out of guilt over the children his anti killed or injured with bombs in Afghanistan.

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* TheAtoner: Altunin helps the spy ring out of guilt over the children his anti unit killed or injured with bombs in Afghanistan.



* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: The Archer's KidSidekick Abdul gets a lot of primincne early on but vanishes form the story later, after The Major becomes The Archer's right-hand man.

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* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: The Archer's KidSidekick Abdul gets a lot of primincne prominence early on but vanishes form the story later, after The Major becomes The Archer's right-hand man.

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* TheAtoner: Altunin helps the spy ring out of guilt over the children his anti killed or injured with bombs in Afghanistan.


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* CoolUncle: Filitov has a role in the life of his wife's great-nephew, attending his hockey games and such.


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* GlamorousSingleMother: Svetlana, who has a young daughter.


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* IDidWhatIHadToDo: The Major acknowledges getting some of his own people killed while serving as a ReverseMole and shows some guilt about it but is also confident it helped establish his cover.


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* ScrewTheRulesIHaveConnections: A somewhat heroic version. Svetlana spies for the Americans partially due to believing that the influence of her father (a Soviet politician) will be able to keep her from being punished if she's caught. This assumption is proven wrong.


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* SpoiledSweet: Gerasimov's daughter is surprisingly likable from what little is shown of her.


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* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: The Archer's KidSidekick Abdul gets a lot of primincne early on but vanishes form the story later, after The Major becomes The Archer's right-hand man.

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* OffscreenMomentOfAwesome: Ramius, in his new post-defection job as a consultant on submarine tactics, was given temporary command of a US attack sub participating in an ASW exercise to see just how good Russia's best sub driver really was. He successfully evaded all attempts to detect him and sank a carrier - the single most heavily guarded ship in the fleet.


* BadassGrandpa: Though he has no grandchildren of his own (his sons died young), Filitov is well-respected and never underestimated even decades after his war service.

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* MisaimedFandom: InUniverse. The operator of the sensory deprivation chamber gleefully talks about how it has made Room101 from Creator/GeorgeOrwell’s ''Literature/NineteenEightyFour'' come true, completely missing that the novel portrayed it as a bad thing. KGB interrogator Vatutin is notably disturbed by this, though he still goes along with using the chamber.

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* EmptyShell: The fate of anyone put in the sensory deprivation chamber, as shown by the fate of Svetlana Vaneyeva.

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* PutOnABus: Senator Donaldson, the SleazyPolitician who had been unwittingly providing information to [[TheMole an aide compromised by the Soviets]], is mentioned to have retired.

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* GambitPileup: The book uses FourLinesAllWaiting to an extent: Filitov's spying is directly connected to Bondarenko's investigation and report of the Bright Star complex, but they are treated as two separate plot lines. There's also the Archer's battles in Afghanistan, Jack Ryan's intelligence efforts, and the Tea Clipper SDI project in New Mexico. And finally Gerasimov's moves in the Politburo. All ''six'' of these plots crash together in spectacular fashion in the last act of the book, despite taking very different routes towards the climax.

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--> '''Mary Pat (written)''': Let's give the microphones a hard-on!


* ArtisticLicensePhysics: The work of the SDI scientists seems to be on the verge of a breakthrough for the entire novel. As we now know, SDI lasers were barely ever more than a pipe dream, and never had a working prototype, especially not a free-electron laser (SDI focused on chemical and X-ray lasers instead). Later books in the series would go on to admit that neither Russia or the US was able to make a laser powerful enough to reliably shoot down a missile, resulting in the projects eventually getting shelved[[note]]The book points out that most of the senior scientists and engineers at the Soviet installation were [[spoiler: killed by the Archer's attack]], and as they were the ones primarily responsible for the breakthrough in laser power (the US having the advantage in laser aiming), no one was able to replicate it afterwards[[/note]].

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* ArtisticLicensePhysics: The work of the SDI scientists seems to be on the verge of a breakthrough for the entire novel. [[ScienceMarchesOn As we now know, know]], SDI lasers were barely ever more than a pipe dream, and never had a working prototype, especially not a free-electron laser (SDI focused on chemical and X-ray lasers instead).instead)[[note]]The reason for the extreme disconnect between reality and the book is that the book was written when SDI was in active development, and ''incredibly'' secret. Clancy makes assumptions, and the physics are more or less accurate, but as a novelist reporting on classified technology, he did the best he could with what he had[[/note]]. Later books in the series would go on to admit that neither Russia or the US was able to make a laser powerful enough to reliably shoot down a missile, resulting in the projects eventually getting shelved[[note]]The book points out that most of the senior scientists and engineers at the Soviet installation were [[spoiler: killed by the Archer's attack]], and as they were the ones primarily responsible for the breakthrough in laser power (the US having the advantage in laser aiming), no one was able to replicate it afterwards[[/note]].


** Filitov as well.

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** Filitov as well.well, but ''only'' when he's actually spying. His ritual for the night before passing information along the chain includes drinking half a bottle of vodka (both to quiet the demons, and to give him a hangover as a convenient excuse to get to the steam baths, his transfer point).

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