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* NoodleIncident: A half-page description of Alan's visit to a Scientology compound is mostly redacted aside from a handful of bizarrely chosen words, including "needless to say" and "the last laugh."

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* NoodleIncident: A half-page description of Alan's visit to a Scientology compound is mostly redacted aside from a handful of bizarrely chosen words, including "needless to say" and "the last "last laugh."


* MyFriendsAndZoidberg: Alan brings up the siege from ''Film/AlanPartridgeAlphaPapa'' a few times and mentions how relieved he was that no one got seriously hurt, each time adding, usually in a footnote, "except for Michael, who died." In fairness, Michael wasn't killed as a result of the siege so much as his own SenselessSacrifice jumping off a pier, and they NeverFoundTheBody anyway.
* NoodleIncident: A half-page description of Alan's visit to a Scientology compound is mostly redacted aside from a handful of bizarrely chosen words, including "needless to say" and "the last laugh."



* UnreliableNarrator: Once again, Alan proves a less-than-trustworthy source on the subject of his life and past.

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* UnreliableNarrator: Once again, Alan proves a less-than-trustworthy source on the subject of his life and past.past, including things we saw for ourselves. A standout case is when he talks about the siege from ''Film/AlanPartridgeAlphaPapa'' and claims that Simon knocked himself out with the fire extinguisher (which was of course Alan's doing in the movie).

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* FailedAttemptAtDrama: Alan tries to stage his confrontation with his wife over her infidelity as if it were a scene out of a soap opera, but his failed attempt at smashing a wine glass, her general indifference to him and Bill Oddie of all people showing up at an inopportune moment to collect the binoculars Alan borrowed from him serve to leech away any dramatic effect he might have been going for.

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* ParentalNeglect: Although Alan tries to spin his relationship with his parents as one of dramatic abuse, reading between the lines suggests that it was actually closer to a vaguely benevolent sense of general indifference towards him.


''I, Partridge'' -- or, to give the full title, ''I, Partridge: We Need to Talk About Alan'' -- is a chronicle of the life of [[UnsympatheticComedyProtagonist broadcasting legend]] Series/AlanPartridge, as written by the man himself[[note]]with Rob Gibbons, Neil Gibbons, Armando Iannucci and Steve Coogan[[/note]] and released in 2011. The autobiography [[UnreliableNarrator accurately]], [[SmallNameBigEgo humbly]] and [[BlatantLies honestly]] chronicles Partridge's [[JadedWashout glorious]] career from humble and difficult Norfolk beginnings surrounded by bullying schoolmates [[SuspiciouslySpecificDenial whose torments he is now completely over and towards whom he holds no grudges whatsoever]] and monstrously {{Abusive Parent}}s [[SuspiciouslySpecificDenial whose cruelty he is not simply exaggerating or outright making up in order to make his childhood seem more edgy and interesting]]. From this, he charts an early career as a reporter in local radio which led to the heights of to an ill-fated career at Creator/TheBBC as a radio and television sports commentator and chat show host, which came to a premature end mainly thanks to the spite and jealousy of people who just didn't get him or his amazing abilities (and only a little bit due to the fact that [[StylisticSuck his show was rubbish]], [[Radio/KnowingMeKnowingYouWithAlanPartridge he accidentally shot a guest dead live on air and then punched his boss during the follow-up Christmas special]]). Partridge then soberly reflects on his divorce from his unfaithful wife and his descent into [[MundaneMadeAwesome Toblerone addiction]], before ending with his triumphant return to his local radio roots where he is [[BlatantLies completely happy and content, with absolutely no desire to get back on television whatsoever]]...

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''I, Partridge'' -- or, to give the full title, ''I, Partridge: We Need to Talk About Alan'' -- is a chronicle of the life of [[UnsympatheticComedyProtagonist broadcasting legend]] Series/AlanPartridge, as written by the man himself[[note]]with Rob Gibbons, Neil Gibbons, Armando Iannucci and Steve Coogan[[/note]] and released in 2011.

The autobiography [[UnreliableNarrator accurately]], [[SmallNameBigEgo humbly]] and [[BlatantLies honestly]] chronicles Partridge's [[JadedWashout glorious]] career from humble and difficult Norfolk beginnings surrounded by bullying schoolmates [[SuspiciouslySpecificDenial whose torments he is now completely over and towards whom he holds no grudges whatsoever]] and monstrously {{Abusive Parent}}s [[SuspiciouslySpecificDenial whose cruelty he is not simply exaggerating or outright making up in order to make his childhood seem more edgy and interesting]]. From this, he charts an early career as a reporter in local radio which led to the heights of to an ill-fated career at Creator/TheBBC as a radio and television sports commentator and chat show host, which came to a premature end mainly thanks to the spite and jealousy of people who just didn't get him or his amazing abilities (and only a little bit due to the fact that [[StylisticSuck his show was rubbish]], [[Radio/KnowingMeKnowingYouWithAlanPartridge he accidentally shot a guest dead live on air and then punched his boss during the follow-up Christmas special]]). Partridge then soberly reflects on his divorce from his unfaithful wife and his descent into [[MundaneMadeAwesome Toblerone addiction]], before ending with his triumphant return to his local radio roots where he is [[BlatantLies completely happy and content, with absolutely no desire to get back on television whatsoever]]...


** He describes a moment early on in his career where he happens to find himself seated on a train opposite a young veteran who has lost his leg. This is around about the time of Gulf War 1, and after a few moments, the carriage bursts out into spontaneous applause. In a perfect illustration of his self-absorbed vanity, it takes Alan a week to realize that the applause wasn't for him.

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** He describes a moment early on in his career around the time of Gulf War 1, where he happens to find himself seated on a train opposite a young veteran who has lost his leg. This is around about the time of Gulf War 1, and after After a few moments, the carriage bursts out into spontaneous applause. In a perfect illustration of his self-absorbed vanity, it takes Alan a week to realize that the applause wasn't for him.


* SlowClap: In Alan's retelling, his final meeting with Tony Hayers in which he is informed that he's not getting a second series of his chat show ends with him delivering a withering put-down to Tony and exiting the BBC restaurant to thunderous applause of this nature from everyone around him "like in a really good movie". In [[Series/ImAlanPartridge reality]] it ended with him throwing a tantrum, assaulting Tony with a block of cheese he'd impaled on a fork and running out screeching, while everyone around him watched in bemusement.

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* SlowClap: In Alan's retelling, his final meeting with Tony Hayers in which he is informed that he's not getting a second series of his chat show ends with him delivering a withering put-down to Tony (or at least what Alan ''considers'' to be a withering put-down) and exiting the BBC restaurant to thunderous applause of this nature from everyone around him "like in a really good movie". In [[Series/ImAlanPartridge reality]] it ended with him throwing a tantrum, assaulting Tony with a block of cheese he'd impaled on a fork and running out screeching, while everyone around him watched in bemusement.


Okay, okay, ''seriously'' now, it's a parody of nakedly self-serving and egotistical entertainment autobiographies, based on the popular British comedy character Alan Partridge. Written by his creators (including Armando Iannucci and Steve Coogan, the actor who portrays him), the book tells Partridge's life and backstory from his perspective, fleshing out the character's backstory and acting as a PerspectiveFlip on significant moments from Partridge's various appearances on radio and television shows such as ''Series/TheDayToday'', ''Radio/KnowingMeKnowingYouWithAlanPartridge'' and ''Series/ImAlanPartridge''. The book thus makes heavy use of the UnreliableNarrator, as the dedicated viewer (or even not-so-dedicated viewer, really) of these shows will notice that there are many significant differences between them versus how Partridge retroactively presents himself when looking back on them.

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Okay, okay, ''seriously'' now, it's a parody of nakedly self-serving and egotistical entertainment autobiographies, based on the popular British comedy character Alan Partridge. Written by his creators (including Armando Iannucci and Steve Coogan, Creator/SteveCoogan, the actor who portrays him), the book tells Partridge's life and backstory from his perspective, fleshing out the character's backstory and acting as a PerspectiveFlip on significant moments from Partridge's various appearances on radio and television shows such as ''Series/TheDayToday'', ''Radio/KnowingMeKnowingYouWithAlanPartridge'' and ''Series/ImAlanPartridge''. The book thus makes heavy use of the UnreliableNarrator, as the dedicated viewer (or even not-so-dedicated viewer, really) of these shows will notice that there are many significant differences between them versus how Partridge retroactively presents himself when looking back on them.

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* ComicallyMissingThePoint: Alan's whole journey in the novel is made of this. When informed that most {{Travelogue Show}}s are built around some kind of historically or personally significant journey for the host, he comes up with a journey to an unsuccessful job interview his dad once made. He decides to turn it into a walk when naturally his dad drove there, meaning that a journey that took only a handful of hours originally ends up taking two weeks. When preparing, he decides to go swimming for exercise instead of walking because he hates walking, and buys a ridiculously and impractically large camping rucksack for a minor walking journey when he's planning on staying in bed-and-breakfasts anyway. And so on.


* ShaggyDogStory: It should come as no surprise that Alan's walk eventually ends up as this. [[spoiler: After his desperation to meet up with Harvey Kennedy Alan eventually ends up getting drunk beforehand and humiliates himself, meaning that his walk is decisively not going to end up on television (not that it was to begin with), and although he eventually does manage to make it to the perimeter fence of the nuclear power plant, he finally collapses due to his injured foot before he can make it all the way.]]



* WisdomFromTheGutter: At a low point, Alan meets Brian, a homeless man who apparently gives him morale support. [[SubvertedTrope And then nicks all his stuff once he falls asleep.]]

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* WisdomFromTheGutter: At a low point, Alan meets Brian, a homeless man who apparently gives him morale support. [[SubvertedTrope And then nicks all his Alan's stuff once he falls asleep.]]

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* SeriousBusiness: Alan treats and tries to depict his over-indulgence on Toblerones following the total collapse of his career as if it were a gritty heroin addiction rather than the minor eating disorder it so clearly was.

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* SlowClap: In Alan's retelling, his final meeting with Tony Hayers in which he is informed that he's not getting a second series of his chat show ends with him delivering a withering put-down to Tony and exiting the BBC restaurant to thunderous applause of this nature from everyone around him "like in a really good movie". In [[Series/ImAlanPartridge reality]] it ended with him throwing a tantrum, assaulting Tony with a block of cheese he'd impaled on a fork and running out screeching, while everyone around him watched in bemusement.


** Alan also tends to reverse his opinions back and forth throughout the novel, sometimes within the same chapter or even within a few paragraphs of each other. In particular, his opinion on the BBC and whether or not he'd like to work there tends to go backwards and forwards depending on whether he's dealing with a section of his life where the BBC has bruised his ego in some way (usually by quite rightfully denying him television work).

to:

** Alan also tends to reverse his opinions back and forth throughout the novel, sometimes within the same chapter or even within a few paragraphs of each other. In particular, his opinion on the BBC and whether or not he'd like to work there tends to go backwards and forwards fluctuate depending on whether or not he's dealing with a section of his life where the BBC has bruised his ego in some way (usually by quite rightfully denying him television work).


** Alan also tends to reverse his opinions back and forth throughout the novel, sometimes within the same chapter or even within a few paragraphs of each other. In particular, his opinion on the BBC and whether or not he'd like to work there tends to go backwards and forwards depending on whether he's dealing with a section where the BBC has bruised his ego in some way (usually by quite rightfully denying him television work).

to:

** Alan also tends to reverse his opinions back and forth throughout the novel, sometimes within the same chapter or even within a few paragraphs of each other. In particular, his opinion on the BBC and whether or not he'd like to work there tends to go backwards and forwards depending on whether he's dealing with a section of his life where the BBC has bruised his ego in some way (usually by quite rightfully denying him television work).


** Alan also tends to reverse his opinions back and forth throughout the novel. In particular, his opinion on the BBC and whether or not he'd like to work there tends to go backwards and forwards depending on whether he's dealing with a section where the BBC has bruised his ego in some way (usually by quite rightfully denying him television work).

to:

** Alan also tends to reverse his opinions back and forth throughout the novel.novel, sometimes within the same chapter or even within a few paragraphs of each other. In particular, his opinion on the BBC and whether or not he'd like to work there tends to go backwards and forwards depending on whether he's dealing with a section where the BBC has bruised his ego in some way (usually by quite rightfully denying him television work).

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