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* ActuallyPrettyFunny: In the film, both Elmer and Jim take the various personal attacks made on them by the other in surprisingly good stride.


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* ContrivedCoincidence: In the film, a girl whom Elmer seduced years ago when they were both living somewhere that implied to be a decent distance from Zenith turns up there as a hooker, and Elmer just so happens to pick the brothel she works at to raid during his TorchesAndPitchforks crusade, and they ''just so happen'' to be brought face-to-face and recognise each other during said raid.


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* DeliberateValuesDissonance: Much of what both Sister Sharon and Elmer (as well as most other ministers) preach revolves around very hardline "Christian" values including upholding the prohibition of alcohol and the supposed evils of gambling, "obscene" pictures, immigration, [[MurderArsonAndJaywalking and jazz music]].
* DisproportionateRetribution: Played almost for laughs in the film. Jim Lefferts publishes one damning article about revivalism in general and especially on Sister Sharon and Elmer's practices and humiliates Sharon when she confronts him about it. In retaliation, Elmer manages to [[TheArtifact (somehow) humiliate Jim by getting him to publicly out himself as an atheist]], get a printed apology for the article from the paper Jim works for, and get himself a 30 minute radio broadcast once a week for the foreseeable future...which he uses to regularly demonise Jim. Even Jim's editor briefly complains how overboard this is. For his part, Jim just laughs all this off.


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* EveryoneHasStandards: In the film, Jim is perfectly happy to write an article that all but outright accuses Elmer and Sister Sharon - as well as most of the other ministers in Zenith - of fraud, but he absolutely refuses to be in any way complicit in the blackmail attempt against Elmer and is even willing to get into a fight with members of an angry mob in order to defend him.
** When Lulu witnesses first-hand just how low Elmer has been brought by her scheme, she promptly goes to the press and admits the whole thing was a set-up.


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** In the film, George Babbitt is arguably even worse than Elmer, preaching prohibition and publicly supporting the outlawing of gambling and prostitution and generally seeming to be a hardline Christian...all while owning several buildings home to speakeasies, gambling dens and brothels and is implied to be supporting Sister Sharon purely for the sake of the money she collects.


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* MaybeMagicMaybeMundane: The entire climax of the film comes across as this. First Sister Sharon appears to genuinely cure a man who recently lost his hearing through nothing more than the power of prayer, with Elmer, Jim and Bill all appearing notably perturbed by this turn of events. Given that [[spoiler:she burns to death in the fire that destroys her new church immediately following this (though the fire was set up by someone tossing away a lit cigarette onto some rags), it's led to more than one interpretation of the ending being that the whole thing was a genuine punishment from God for her hubris.]]


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* NotEvenBotheringWithTheAccent: Jean Simmons as Sister Sharon tries for an American accent occasionally but for the most part she uses her own natural English accent.


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* VerbalTic: In the film, Elmer has a habit of addressing male acquaintances (especially Jim) by tagging "-boy" onto the end of their names.
** George Babbitt is also prone to pronouncing "correct" as "keerect".
* VillainProtagonist: "Villain" might be a bit strong, but Elmer is decidedly ''not'' a good guy (morally speaking) despite his charm.


* {{Hypocrite}}: Elmer is a supreme example. He works as a minister and says that his aim is to "save souls", even though he doesn't really believe in Christianity. He's a DryCrusader, who actually loves drinking (though in the novel, he eventually manages to quit). He rails against sexual sins, while he [[YourCheatingHeart cheats on his wife]] with a married woman.

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* {{Hypocrite}}: Elmer is a supreme example. He works as a minister and says that his aim is to "save souls", even though he doesn't really believe in Christianity. He's a DryCrusader, who actually loves drinking (though in the novel, he eventually manages to quit). He rails against sexual sins, while he [[YourCheatingHeart cheats on his wife]] wife with a married woman.


A novel written by Creator/SinclairLewis and published in 1927, ''Elmer Gantry'' was brought to the screen by director and writer Richard Brooks in 1960. The title role was played by Creator/BurtLancaster, who won an UsefulNotes/AcademyAward along with co-star [[Series/ThePartridgeFamily Shirley Jones]] (who played Lulu Bains) and Brooks' screenplay. Creator/JeanSimmons also starred as Sharon Falconer.

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A novel written by Creator/SinclairLewis and published in 1927, ''Elmer Gantry'' was brought to the screen by director and writer Richard Brooks in 1960. The title role was played by Creator/BurtLancaster, who won an UsefulNotes/AcademyAward along with co-star [[Series/ThePartridgeFamily Shirley Jones]] (who played Lulu Bains) and Brooks' screenplay. Creator/JeanSimmons also starred as Sharon Falconer.
Falconer. There was also a 2007 opera adaptation by Robert Aldridge, with libretto by Herschel Garfein.


** In the book, two characters agree that the Sinclair Lewis novel ''Main Street'' is very boring.

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** In the book, two characters agree that the Sinclair Lewis novel ''Main Street'' [[SelfDeprecation is very boring.boring]].


* SinisterMinister: Although one who is slick and self-deluded.

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* SinisterMinister: Although Albeit one who is who's not really evil so much as slick and self-deluded.


A novel written by Creator/SinclairLewis and published in 1927, ''Elmer Gantry'' was brought to the screen by director and writer Richard Brooks in 1960. The title role was played by Creator/BurtLancaster, who won an Oscar along with co-star Shirley Jones and Brooks' screenplay. Creator/JeanSimmons also starred as Sharon Falconer.

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A novel written by Creator/SinclairLewis and published in 1927, ''Elmer Gantry'' was brought to the screen by director and writer Richard Brooks in 1960. The title role was played by Creator/BurtLancaster, who won an Oscar UsefulNotes/AcademyAward along with co-star [[Series/ThePartridgeFamily Shirley Jones Jones]] (who played Lulu Bains) and Brooks' screenplay. Creator/JeanSimmons also starred as Sharon Falconer.


[[quoteright:300:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Elmer_Gantry_9598.JPG]]

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[[quoteright:300:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Elmer_Gantry_9598.JPG]]
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->''"I have here in my pocket - and thank heaven you can't see them - lewd, dirty, obscene, and I'm ashamed to say this: French postcards. They were sold to me in front of your own innocent high school by a man with a black beard... a foreigner."''

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[[quoteright:333:https://static.[[quoteright:300:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Elmer_Gantry_9598.JPG]]

->''"I have here in my pocket - -- and thank heaven you can't see them - -- lewd, dirty, obscene, and I'm ashamed to say this: French postcards. They were sold to me in front of your own innocent high school by a man with a black beard... a foreigner."''


* {{Bowdlerize}}: Protestants declared Lewis' book as sacrilegious, and [[UsefulNotes/TheHaysCode the Hays office]] would stop at nothing to appease them. Adding a written prologue saying in a nutshell "These characters don't represent Christians as a whole" wasn't enough. The film turns Gantry into a corrupt bible salesman instead of a minister, and Sister Sharon is modified to be the "good Christian" to counter the corrupt nature of Gantry. In addition Lefferts becomes a news reporter instead of a minister, which leads to a very odd scene. (See TheArtifact above.)

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* {{Bowdlerize}}: Protestants declared Lewis' book as sacrilegious, and [[UsefulNotes/TheHaysCode the Hays office]] would stop at nothing to appease them. Adding a written prologue saying in a nutshell "These characters don't represent Christians as a whole" wasn't enough. The film turns Gantry into a corrupt bible salesman instead of a minister, and Sister Sharon is modified to be the "good Christian" to counter the corrupt nature of Gantry. In addition Lefferts becomes a news reporter instead of a minister, which leads to a very odd scene. (See TheArtifact above.)


* {{Bowdlerize}}: Protestants declared Lewis' book as sacrilegious, and [[UsefulNotes/TheHaysCode the Hays office]] would stop at nothing to appease them. Adding a written prologue saying in a nutshell "These characters don't represent Christians as a whole" wasn't enough. The film turns Gantry into a corrupt bible salesman instead of a minister, and Sister Sharon is modified to be the "good Christian" to counter the corrupt nature of the other evangelists.

to:

* {{Bowdlerize}}: Protestants declared Lewis' book as sacrilegious, and [[UsefulNotes/TheHaysCode the Hays office]] would stop at nothing to appease them. Adding a written prologue saying in a nutshell "These characters don't represent Christians as a whole" wasn't enough. The film turns Gantry into a corrupt bible salesman instead of a minister, and Sister Sharon is modified to be the "good Christian" to counter the corrupt nature of the other evangelists. Gantry. In addition Lefferts becomes a news reporter instead of a minister, which leads to a very odd scene. (See TheArtifact above.)


* {{Bowdlerize}}: Protestants declared Lewis' book as sacrilegious, and UsefulNotes/TheHaysCode would stop at nothing to appease them. Adding a written prologue saying in a nutshell "These characters don't represent Christians as a whole" wasn't enough. The film turns Gantry into a corrupt bible salesman instead of a minister, and Sister Sharon is modified to be the "good Christian" to counter the corrupt nature of the other evangelists.

to:

* {{Bowdlerize}}: Protestants declared Lewis' book as sacrilegious, and UsefulNotes/TheHaysCode [[UsefulNotes/TheHaysCode the Hays office]] would stop at nothing to appease them. Adding a written prologue saying in a nutshell "These characters don't represent Christians as a whole" wasn't enough. The film turns Gantry into a corrupt bible salesman instead of a minister, and Sister Sharon is modified to be the "good Christian" to counter the corrupt nature of the other evangelists.


* {{Bowdlerize}}: Protestants declared Lewis' book as sacrilegious, and TheHaysCode would stop at nothing to appease them. Adding a written prologue saying in a nutshell "These characters don't represent Christians as a whole" wasn't enough. The film turns Gantry into a corrupt bible salesman instead of a minister, and Sister Sharon is modified to be the "good Christian" to counter the corrupt nature of the other evangelists.

to:

* {{Bowdlerize}}: Protestants declared Lewis' book as sacrilegious, and TheHaysCode UsefulNotes/TheHaysCode would stop at nothing to appease them. Adding a written prologue saying in a nutshell "These characters don't represent Christians as a whole" wasn't enough. The film turns Gantry into a corrupt bible salesman instead of a minister, and Sister Sharon is modified to be the "good Christian" to counter the corrupt nature of the other evangelists.

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* {{Bowdlerize}}: Protestants declared Lewis' book as sacrilegious, and TheHaysCode would stop at nothing to appease them. Adding a written prologue saying in a nutshell "These characters don't represent Christians as a whole" wasn't enough. The film turns Gantry into a corrupt bible salesman instead of a minister, and Sister Sharon is modified to be the "good Christian" to counter the corrupt nature of the other evangelists.


A novel written by Creator/SinclairLewis and published in 1927, ''Elmer Gantry'' was brought to the screen by director and writer Richard Brooks in 1960. The title role was played by Creator/BurtLancaster, who won an Oscar along with co-star Shirley Jones and Brooks' screenplay.

to:

A novel written by Creator/SinclairLewis and published in 1927, ''Elmer Gantry'' was brought to the screen by director and writer Richard Brooks in 1960. The title role was played by Creator/BurtLancaster, who won an Oscar along with co-star Shirley Jones and Brooks' screenplay.
screenplay. Creator/JeanSimmons also starred as Sharon Falconer.


* {{Hypocrite}}: Elmer is a supreme example. He works as a minister and says that his aim is to "save souls", even though he doesn't really believe in Christianity. He's a DryCrusader, who actually loves drinking (though in the novel, he eventually manages the quit). He rails against sexual sins, while he cheats on his wife with a married woman.

to:

* {{Hypocrite}}: Elmer is a supreme example. He works as a minister and says that his aim is to "save souls", even though he doesn't really believe in Christianity. He's a DryCrusader, who actually loves drinking (though in the novel, he eventually manages the to quit). He rails against sexual sins, while he [[YourCheatingHeart cheats on his wife wife]] with a married woman.

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