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** It could be that they're keeping a psychic on their teams so that they won't get sweeped by psychic type pokemon.

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** It could be that they're keeping a psychic pokemon on their teams so that they won't get sweeped by psychic type pokemon.

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**It could be that they're keeping a psychic on their teams so that they won't get sweeped by psychic type pokemon.

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* The Fuchsia City Gym is poison themed, so why do all the trainers other than Koga use Psychic types?


** Shigeki Morimoto, the programmer who created Mew, is credited with both programming and monster design for Pokemon Red / Blue - and Mew wasn't known when the game was released, so his monster design credits mean that he worked on the art of other pokemon as well; he was both an artist and a programmer. And, indeed, according to the other wiki and an interview translated [[https://nintendoeverything.com/game-freaks-shigeki-morimoto-on-mew-why-it-was-initially-rare-design-more/ here]], Mew was designed entirely by Morimoto - the only pokemon with no input from art director Ken Sugimori. Morimoto designed the sprite himself, though he based it off of Mewtwo for obvious reasons and made it as simple as possible. It's important to remember that back then graphics were simpler in general, there were fewer people on the graphical-art career track in the first place, the limitations of technology meant that understanding what you had to work with was an important part of making arts or music for games, and, as a result of these things, it was not that unusual for programmers to undertake some graphical duties the way Morimoto did.

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** Shigeki Morimoto, the programmer who created Mew, is credited with both programming and monster design for Pokemon Red / Blue - and Mew wasn't known when the game was released, so his monster design credits mean that he worked on the art of other pokemon as well; he was both an artist and a programmer. And, indeed, according to the other wiki and an interview translated [[https://nintendoeverything.com/game-freaks-shigeki-morimoto-on-mew-why-it-was-initially-rare-design-more/ here]], Mew was designed entirely by Morimoto - the only pokemon with no input from art director Ken Sugimori. Morimoto designed the sprite himself, though he based it off of Mewtwo for obvious reasons and made it as simple as possible. It's important to remember that back then graphics were simpler in general, there were fewer people on the graphical-art career track in the first place, the limitations of technology meant that understanding what you had to work with was an important part of making arts or music for games, and, as a result of these things, it was not that unusual for programmers to undertake some graphical duties the way Morimoto did. Nowadays the game has massive dedicated teams for each aspect, with extensive training and experience in that area; but that wasn't as true back in 1996.


** Shigeki Morimoto, the programmer who created Mew, is credited with both programming and monster design for Pokemon Red / Blue (and Mew wasn't known when the game was released, so his monster design credits mean that he worked on the art of other pokemon as well.) And, indeed, according to the other wiki and an interview translated [[https://nintendoeverything.com/game-freaks-shigeki-morimoto-on-mew-why-it-was-initially-rare-design-more/ here]], Mew was designed entirely by Morimoto - the only pokemon with no input from art director Ken Sugimori. Morimoto designed the sprite himself, though he based it off of Mewtwo for obvious reasons and made it as simple as possible. It's important to remember that back then graphics were simpler in general, there were fewer people on the graphical-art career track in the first place, the limitations of technology meant that understanding what you had to work with was an important part of making arts or music for games, and, as a result of these things, it was not that unusual for programmers to undertake some graphical duties the way Morimoto did.

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** Shigeki Morimoto, the programmer who created Mew, is credited with both programming and monster design for Pokemon Red / Blue (and - and Mew wasn't known when the game was released, so his monster design credits mean that he worked on the art of other pokemon as well.) well; he was both an artist and a programmer. And, indeed, according to the other wiki and an interview translated [[https://nintendoeverything.com/game-freaks-shigeki-morimoto-on-mew-why-it-was-initially-rare-design-more/ here]], Mew was designed entirely by Morimoto - the only pokemon with no input from art director Ken Sugimori. Morimoto designed the sprite himself, though he based it off of Mewtwo for obvious reasons and made it as simple as possible. It's important to remember that back then graphics were simpler in general, there were fewer people on the graphical-art career track in the first place, the limitations of technology meant that understanding what you had to work with was an important part of making arts or music for games, and, as a result of these things, it was not that unusual for programmers to undertake some graphical duties the way Morimoto did.

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** The only successful JRPGs in the US at the time were fantasy ones. It's likely that they patterned the translation after those in hopes of making it easier for players to immediately understand what the items did.

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** The simple answer is that back in that era there wasn't a lot of time, money, or effort put into translations. Nobody knew how big Pokemon was going to be when the first game was translated. That meant that a lot of things were just given quick "good enough" names, often by people whose native language wasn't English.


** Shigeki Morimoto, the programmer who created Mew, is credited with both programming and monster design for Pokemon Red / Blue (and Mew wasn't known when the game was released, so his monster design credits mean that he worked on the art of other pokemon as well.) And, indeed, according to the other wiki and an interview translated [https://nintendoeverything.com/game-freaks-shigeki-morimoto-on-mew-why-it-was-initially-rare-design-more/ here], Mew was designed entirely by Morimoto - the only pokemon with no input from art director Ken Sugimori. Morimoto designed the sprite himself, though he based it off of Mewtwo for obvious reasons and made it as simple as possible. It's important to remember that back then graphics were simpler in general, there were fewer people on the graphical-art career track in the first place, the limitations of technology meant that understanding what you had to work with was an important part of making arts or music for games, and, as a result of these things, it was not that unusual for programmers to undertake some graphical duties the way Morimoto did.

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** Shigeki Morimoto, the programmer who created Mew, is credited with both programming and monster design for Pokemon Red / Blue (and Mew wasn't known when the game was released, so his monster design credits mean that he worked on the art of other pokemon as well.) And, indeed, according to the other wiki and an interview translated [https://nintendoeverything.[[https://nintendoeverything.com/game-freaks-shigeki-morimoto-on-mew-why-it-was-initially-rare-design-more/ here], here]], Mew was designed entirely by Morimoto - the only pokemon with no input from art director Ken Sugimori. Morimoto designed the sprite himself, though he based it off of Mewtwo for obvious reasons and made it as simple as possible. It's important to remember that back then graphics were simpler in general, there were fewer people on the graphical-art career track in the first place, the limitations of technology meant that understanding what you had to work with was an important part of making arts or music for games, and, as a result of these things, it was not that unusual for programmers to undertake some graphical duties the way Morimoto did.

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** Shigeki Morimoto, the programmer who created Mew, is credited with both programming and monster design for Pokemon Red / Blue (and Mew wasn't known when the game was released, so his monster design credits mean that he worked on the art of other pokemon as well.) And, indeed, according to the other wiki and an interview translated [https://nintendoeverything.com/game-freaks-shigeki-morimoto-on-mew-why-it-was-initially-rare-design-more/ here], Mew was designed entirely by Morimoto - the only pokemon with no input from art director Ken Sugimori. Morimoto designed the sprite himself, though he based it off of Mewtwo for obvious reasons and made it as simple as possible. It's important to remember that back then graphics were simpler in general, there were fewer people on the graphical-art career track in the first place, the limitations of technology meant that understanding what you had to work with was an important part of making arts or music for games, and, as a result of these things, it was not that unusual for programmers to undertake some graphical duties the way Morimoto did.

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Headscratchers for ''VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue''.
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** Given how deformed Mew's Red/Green JP sprite looked, it might not have been drawn by someone who's in charge of spritework.



** Given how deformed Mew's Red/Green JP sprite looked, it might not have been drawn by someone who's in charge of spritework.

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** Sprite drawn and added/scanned at the same time Mew was added, without having to involve the official sprite artist?


** [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness Early installment weirdness]]? There actually was quite an argument a few months ago, with a lot of the fandom being flabberghasted when they found out that bulbasaur line is based on frogs, so many people actually didn't see it before it was pointed out to them.

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** [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness Early installment weirdness]]? There actually was quite an argument a few months ago, with a lot of the fandom being flabberghasted flabbergasted when they found out that bulbasaur Bulbasaur line is based on frogs, so many people actually didn't see it before it was pointed out to them.


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* Has anyone else noticed that when you fight Misty in the first game, she claims her strategy is all out offensive, yet in the battle she goes on the defensive, spamming Harden and X-Defend?
** Obviously a clever bluff so that you'll be ''expecting'' an all-out offensive, then be caught off guard when you don't get one. Misty is a tricky snake!
*** That doesn't seem too effective; the opposite (appearing meek but striking fast) would be better. However, there may be an socio-emotional component to this, (see the "tomboy" IJBM below).
* How tall is Red pre-timeskip? I've seen official artwork of him for gen-1, and he seems shorter then both Leaf and Misty.
** Well, if you're comparing gen-1!Red to Leaf, there's probably going to be some height differences due to the art styles. Other than that...there's not really a way of knowing, because the only confirmed heights are for the Gen IV trainers (And maybe the Gen V trainers? I don't know if your Pokédex gets upgraded to show heights later or anything.)
*** I'm comparing their Generation 1 designs to each other.
*** ...What picture of Leaf in generation 1 are you talking about?
*** It's probably the one that Green (or Blue in Japan) from Adventures is based on. Though Ken Sugimori has changed his style significantly since Gen 1, so you should probably base the comparisons on current artwork. Though girls do tend to be taller than guys at that age. But if you're going by Gen 1 art, it can be hard to tell because they're not standing right next to each other. But as we know, ArtistsAreNotArchitects.

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** Perhaps Silph Co made only one specimen at the time and Team Rocket stole it when they took over the company.


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** Possibly to avoid trademark issues involving [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Super_Ball this]].

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* Why did the Super Ball get renamed Great Ball in the localization? It couldn't be that they found the original name too silly, as they kept the equally silly name "Ultra Ball".

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