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* Who is the biggest hero of the Original Trilogy? Is it Luke? Han? Ben Kenobi? Leia? R2-D2? No, it is the Imperial officer who says not to shoot the escape pod containing Threepio and Artoo at the beginning of ''A New Hope''. Had they shot down the pod, just to be sure, Artoo and Threepio would never have reached Tatooine, they would never have found their way to Luke and he would still be stuck as a farmboy in Tatooine, the special message would never have reached Luke or Ben Kenobi and as such Princess Leia would never have been rescued and the Rebels would never have the plans to destroy the Death Star, Han Solo would never have been hired by Ben and never subsequently joined the Rebellion, and, further down the line, Luke would have never discovered his destiny, trained with Yoda, found out that Leia (whom he never would've met) was his sister and that Vader (whom he never would've met either) was his father and so on. If not for that Imperial Officer, the events of the entire Original Trilogy and the Expanded Universe beyond that would never have happened at all. - Tropers/{{Jedd-the-Jedi}}

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* Who is the biggest hero of the Original Trilogy? Is it Luke? Han? Ben Kenobi? Leia? R2-D2? No, it is the Imperial officer who says not to shoot the escape pod containing Threepio and Artoo at the beginning of ''A New Hope''. Had they shot down the pod, just to be sure, Artoo and Threepio would never have reached Tatooine, they would never have found their way to Luke and he would still be stuck as a farmboy in Tatooine, the special message would never have reached Luke or Ben Kenobi and as such Princess Leia would never have been rescued and the Rebels would never have the plans to destroy the Death Star, Han Solo would never have been hired by Ben and never subsequently joined the Rebellion, and, further down the line, Luke would have never discovered his destiny, trained with Yoda, found out that Leia (whom he never would've met) was his sister and that Vader (whom he never would've met either) was his father and so on. If not for that Imperial Officer, the events of the entire Original Trilogy and the Expanded Universe beyond that would never have happened at all. - Tropers/{{Jedd-the-Jedi}}



** For what it's worth, though, even in the framework of the movies, the pod being shot down, destroying [=R2=] and [=3PO=] would still not necessarily imply Luke remaining a farm boy; for all we know, Obi-Wan could have decided to train Luke as a Jedi otherwise. Let's just leave it at that... - [=neoYTPism=]

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** For what it's worth, though, even in the framework of the movies, the pod being shot down, destroying [=R2=] and [=3PO=] would still not necessarily imply Luke remaining a farm boy; for all we know, Obi-Wan could have decided to train Luke as a Jedi otherwise. Let's just leave it at that... - [=neoYTPism=]



** Revenge of The Sith - Return of The Jedi, both refer to an old power coming back. - [=HG131=]

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** Revenge of The Sith - Return of The Jedi, both refer to an old power coming back. - [=HG131=]



* While I was always far more forgiving toward the prequels than many people, one part that seemed too dumb to put up with was Anakin's conception: [[CrystalDragonJesus Jesus rip off?]] Born of The Force? Gimme a break. But then Palpatine explained his master's preoccupation, and the stupidest part of the prequel trilogy suddenly became the most ingenious. -- EricDVH

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* While I was always far more forgiving toward the prequels than many people, one part that seemed too dumb to put up with was Anakin's conception: [[CrystalDragonJesus Jesus rip off?]] Born of The Force? Gimme a break. But then Palpatine explained his master's preoccupation, and the stupidest part of the prequel trilogy suddenly became the most ingenious. -- EricDVH



** The extended materials extend the quality of it even further. Palpatine killed his master because he believed that his master intended to conceive a child using the Force, and that the child would subsequently kill Palpatine. Palpatine was right. --Wodan46
*** My uncle described a moment of Fridge Brilliance he had with that same conversation. Palpatine described the perspectives of the Jedi and the Sith; the Jedi are inherently selfless, forsaking personal things to benefit the Republic while the Sith are inherently selfish, "Treachery is the way of the Sith." Yet the Sith learned to control the force to create life and prevent death. The Jedi found a way to achieve immortality for themselves after death. Both are essentially contrary to the philosophical beliefs of the two factions, one discovering a power to help others and one discovering a power to benefit themselves. --{{KJMackley}}
*** I was also confused by the contradiction of the ultimate expressions of the Light and Dark sides of the Force. It didn't make sense that the ultimate expression of the Light side was a form of immortality for oneself, while the ultimate expression of the Dark side was a technique to create life and preserve others. Then it occurred to me: the power of the Light side isn't about benefiting yourself; it's about becoming a part of the living Force itself to act as a guide for others. The main reason Force Ghosts exist is to guide the living. It's the ultimate act of selflessness, helping others even from beyond. OTOH, the ultimate power of the Dark side, creating life, represents the complete subjugation of the Force. It grants the Sith power over both life and death, essentially making him/her into a god. The Light is about acceptance and harmony with the Force, becoming part of it, and the Dark is about defying and controlling it. - M84

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** The extended materials extend the quality of it even further. Palpatine killed his master because he believed that his master intended to conceive a child using the Force, and that the child would subsequently kill Palpatine. Palpatine was right. --Wodan46
right.
*** My uncle described a moment of Fridge Brilliance he had with that same conversation. Palpatine described the perspectives of the Jedi and the Sith; the Jedi are inherently selfless, forsaking personal things to benefit the Republic while the Sith are inherently selfish, "Treachery is the way of the Sith." Yet the Sith learned to control the force to create life and prevent death. The Jedi found a way to achieve immortality for themselves after death. Both are essentially contrary to the philosophical beliefs of the two factions, one discovering a power to help others and one discovering a power to benefit themselves. --{{KJMackley}}\n
*** I was also confused by the contradiction of the ultimate expressions of the Light and Dark sides of the Force. It didn't make sense that the ultimate expression of the Light side was a form of immortality for oneself, while the ultimate expression of the Dark side was a technique to create life and preserve others. Then it occurred to me: the power of the Light side isn't about benefiting yourself; it's about becoming a part of the living Force itself to act as a guide for others. The main reason Force Ghosts exist is to guide the living. It's the ultimate act of selflessness, helping others even from beyond. OTOH, the ultimate power of the Dark side, creating life, represents the complete subjugation of the Force. It grants the Sith power over both life and death, essentially making him/her into a god. The Light is about acceptance and harmony with the Force, becoming part of it, and the Dark is about defying and controlling it. - M84



* Little worried I'm misusing the phrase, but here goes: Jar Jar Binks. I was indifferent at first, then annoyed, then I watched ''The Phantom Menace'' again three days ago. I realized Jar Jar was not an idiot, nor hyper, nor a total goofball, just a poor, clumsy guy who was always in the wrong way at the wrong time. He was even capable of solemnity, at certain points, even in Episode I. Now, I actually respect Jar Jar as a decent member of the group! And then, in a further bit of Fridge Brilliance, I realized that Lucas probably didn't mean anything by using semi-real accents for certain species! These races likely didn't have Basic as their first language. They're probably taught something else during their childhood. The language shapes the mouth, and gives the accent, and do you expect a writer to make an accent up out of thin air? He's going to borrow from something he's seen! So no offence was meant! -- Lhikan

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* Little worried I'm misusing the phrase, but here goes: Jar Jar Binks. I was indifferent at first, then annoyed, then I watched ''The Phantom Menace'' again three days ago. I realized Jar Jar was not an idiot, nor hyper, nor a total goofball, just a poor, clumsy guy who was always in the wrong way at the wrong time. He was even capable of solemnity, at certain points, even in Episode I. Now, I actually respect Jar Jar as a decent member of the group! And then, in a further bit of Fridge Brilliance, I realized that Lucas probably didn't mean anything by using semi-real accents for certain species! These races likely didn't have Basic as their first language. They're probably taught something else during their childhood. The language shapes the mouth, and gives the accent, and do you expect a writer to make an accent up out of thin air? He's going to borrow from something he's seen! So no offence was meant! -- Lhikan



** Yeah well, lots of people are racist and sexist and all those other things without meaning to be. And I say that as an avowed prequel fan who ''never'' hated Jar Jar. --TrickyPacifist

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** Yeah well, lots of people are racist and sexist and all those other things without meaning to be. And I say that as an avowed prequel fan who ''never'' hated Jar Jar. --TrickyPacifist



** My father is not a fan of the PT, but he liked the CG-animation that went into making Jar-Jar. He thought as a interacting being, Jar-Jar absolutely worked. - Tropers/{{Premonition45}}

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** My father is not a fan of the PT, but he liked the CG-animation that went into making Jar-Jar. He thought as a interacting being, Jar-Jar absolutely worked. - Tropers/{{Premonition45}}



** I'm partial to the explanation that midichlorians aren't in any way force generators. A high midichlorian count is simply a symptom of somebody being highly sensitive to the force. - SkarmoryThePG

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** I'm partial to the explanation that midichlorians aren't in any way force generators. A high midichlorian count is simply a symptom of somebody being highly sensitive to the force. - SkarmoryThePG



*** EXACTLY. Midichlorians are '''not''' the Force. They can only communicate with it. They do the same thing on a microscopic level what we thought Luke and others were doing in the original movies.--Tapol.

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*** EXACTLY. Midichlorians are '''not''' the Force. They can only communicate with it. They do the same thing on a microscopic level what we thought Luke and others were doing in the original movies.--Tapol.



*** I always interpreted the Force to be the active force representation of the Unified Field Theory - i.e. it is the unified force that governs all physics and movement within the universe - and hence that the Midichlorians just are a conduit to tap into the Force. I mean, technically, if everyone could tap into the Force just through years and years of practice, then Yoda would be a god by now (considering he was alive for 800 years) - the potential for use of the Force would be infinite if access to it was not restricted by a physiological imperative while the individual was alive. Once they die, we cross full on into Nirvana territory (merging with the Force, becoming one with the universe etc. etc.). I never saw it as DoingInTheWizard, but rather [[FunctionalMagic Giving The Wizard A Wand]]... er, [[{{Metaphorgotten}} sorta]]. - 13secondstomidnight

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*** I always interpreted the Force to be the active force representation of the Unified Field Theory - i.e. it is the unified force that governs all physics and movement within the universe - and hence that the Midichlorians just are a conduit to tap into the Force. I mean, technically, if everyone could tap into the Force just through years and years of practice, then Yoda would be a god by now (considering he was alive for 800 years) - the potential for use of the Force would be infinite if access to it was not restricted by a physiological imperative while the individual was alive. Once they die, we cross full on into Nirvana territory (merging with the Force, becoming one with the universe etc. etc.). I never saw it as DoingInTheWizard, but rather [[FunctionalMagic Giving The Wizard A Wand]]... er, [[{{Metaphorgotten}} sorta]]. - 13secondstomidnight



* I juuust realized that the R2 units on X-Wings are supposed to emulate the round observation dome on top of bombers. -- {{Tropers/Jonn}}
* A moment of FridgeBrilliance for myself was the pre-emptive realization that The Chosen One was always fated to destroy the Jedi Order. Even though the Jedi interpret the legend to fortell the end of the Sith, they are always careful to explicitly state: "The Chosen One will ''bring balance to the force''." At the time of Anakin's arrival, there are a tiny number of Sith and vast numbers of Jedi. Hence, to balance the force Anakin must kill most of the Jedi. By the original Star Wars trilogy we know of only two Sith (Palpatine and Vader) and two remaining Jedi (Obi-Wan and Yoda). -- Pak
** I thought this, too, until I stumbled across something George Lucas says in one of the DVD commentaries. He says that the Force is like a living entity, and that the Sith are akin to a cancer or disease, bringing it out of whack. Anakin/Vader fulfils the prophecy by doing away with the Sith, which requires him to sacrifice himself in the process. If a person's health is out of balance (y'know, he's sick), you don't make him sicker to make things fair, right? If you want to see how he phrased it, [[http://blogs.starwars.com/moosepoodo/17 here's]] a link. -- LonePaladin
*** Actually, YES you DO treat some medical conditions by injuring a person further. Especially with CANCER. Think about it. What is surgery? It's cutting a person open. The fact that you sew them up afterwards notwithstanding. We're just so used to the idea that it seldom occurs to us that that is what surgery is. The other major way cancer is treated is by poisoning the patient, with a poison that (we hope) will affect the cancerous tissue more than it affects healthy tissue. We call this 'chemotherapy'. -- auswelter
** WordOfGod or not, I disagree: I had a similar moment to Pak's: 2 Sith + balance = ...2 Jedi. (Ooops!) Given the way the phrase was so clearly and constantly used, I see it as a combination of arrogance and blindness on the part of the Jedi that made them assume that "balance" would mean "we win" (and would therefore be a ''good'' thing, instead of the prophecy of disaster it turned out to be). -- diannelamerc
*** While I agree that there is a certain attraction to the idea that "bringing balance to the Force" doesn't just mean destroying the Sith and may not even be something good, that equal numbers reasoning never appealed to me. Jedi and Sith are the main organizations of Force-users, by they do not, in their totality, constitute the Force itself. Even just between Jedi and Sith, there's a lot more that goes into "balance" than how many living adherents each side can boast. [[FridgeLogic Equalizing the number of Jedi and the number of Sith = bringing balance to the ''Force''? I think not]]. -- TrickyPacifist

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* I juuust realized that the R2 units on X-Wings are supposed to emulate the round observation dome on top of bombers. -- {{Tropers/Jonn}}\n
* A moment of FridgeBrilliance for myself was the pre-emptive realization that The Chosen One was always fated to destroy the Jedi Order. Even though the Jedi interpret the legend to fortell the end of the Sith, they are always careful to explicitly state: "The Chosen One will ''bring balance to the force''." At the time of Anakin's arrival, there are a tiny number of Sith and vast numbers of Jedi. Hence, to balance the force Anakin must kill most of the Jedi. By the original Star Wars trilogy we know of only two Sith (Palpatine and Vader) and two remaining Jedi (Obi-Wan and Yoda). -- Pak\n
** I thought this, too, until I stumbled across something George Lucas says in one of the DVD commentaries. He says that the Force is like a living entity, and that the Sith are akin to a cancer or disease, bringing it out of whack. Anakin/Vader fulfils the prophecy by doing away with the Sith, which requires him to sacrifice himself in the process. If a person's health is out of balance (y'know, he's sick), you don't make him sicker to make things fair, right? If you want to see how he phrased it, [[http://blogs.starwars.com/moosepoodo/17 here's]] a link. -- LonePaladin\n
*** Actually, YES you DO treat some medical conditions by injuring a person further. Especially with CANCER. Think about it. What is surgery? It's cutting a person open. The fact that you sew them up afterwards notwithstanding. We're just so used to the idea that it seldom occurs to us that that is what surgery is. The other major way cancer is treated is by poisoning the patient, with a poison that (we hope) will affect the cancerous tissue more than it affects healthy tissue. We call this 'chemotherapy'. -- auswelter\n
** WordOfGod or not, I disagree: I had a similar moment to Pak's: 2 Sith + balance = ...2 Jedi. (Ooops!) Given the way the phrase was so clearly and constantly used, I see it as a combination of arrogance and blindness on the part of the Jedi that made them assume that "balance" would mean "we win" (and would therefore be a ''good'' thing, instead of the prophecy of disaster it turned out to be). -- diannelamerc\n
*** While I agree that there is a certain attraction to the idea that "bringing balance to the Force" doesn't just mean destroying the Sith and may not even be something good, that equal numbers reasoning never appealed to me. Jedi and Sith are the main organizations of Force-users, by they do not, in their totality, constitute the Force itself. Even just between Jedi and Sith, there's a lot more that goes into "balance" than how many living adherents each side can boast. [[FridgeLogic Equalizing the number of Jedi and the number of Sith = bringing balance to the ''Force''? I think not]]. -- TrickyPacifist



*** Just to add even more confusion, there's the issue of the so-called True Sith, who live in the Unknown Regions. That's two Sith orders to one Jedi order. And the True Sith are only mentioned in the [=KotOR=] games. How's that for FridgeBrilliance? -MutantRancor
*** While I agree that Bringing Balance wasn't likely to be reducing the number of Jedi to equal the number of Sith, I always viewed the Jedi as fallen or failed. The Force is Life and exists in the myriad of shades of grey. Having only good would lead to an ineffectual Ivory Tower or totalitarian utopian society. Thus the Old Jedi order also needed to be removed to allow the Force to from freely through the universe without being shoehorned into a "human" flawed morality system. -NightHaunter

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*** Just to add even more confusion, there's the issue of the so-called True Sith, who live in the Unknown Regions. That's two Sith orders to one Jedi order. And the True Sith are only mentioned in the [=KotOR=] games. How's that for FridgeBrilliance? -MutantRancor
FridgeBrilliance?
*** While I agree that Bringing Balance wasn't likely to be reducing the number of Jedi to equal the number of Sith, I always viewed the Jedi as fallen or failed. The Force is Life and exists in the myriad of shades of grey. Having only good would lead to an ineffectual Ivory Tower or totalitarian utopian society. Thus the Old Jedi order also needed to be removed to allow the Force to from freely through the universe without being shoehorned into a "human" flawed morality system. -NightHaunter



*** Alternatively, Luke is neither. He never finished his Jedi training. Vader killed Obi-Wan, Palpatine and himself, while Yoda died on his own. No Jedi left, no Sith left. Balance! -- {{Tenebrais}}

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*** Alternatively, Luke is neither. He never finished his Jedi training. Vader killed Obi-Wan, Palpatine and himself, while Yoda died on his own. No Jedi left, no Sith left. Balance! -- {{Tenebrais}}



*** What I personally think on the matter of the "balance issue" is that it is essentially a reset button. We mustn't focus on the fact that all the Jedi and Sith died but WHY they died. This reason is misuse of the Force. This is more obvious in the Sith than in the Jedi. The Jedi are steadfast in their old ways without being open to new ones and adapting likewise. In fact think of it this way: an organization who only accepts infants as members whom they will then train to use a specific elite skill-set that cannot be used by those not chosen, they are also taught a strict set of beliefs that includes forbidding them from exhibiting emotion and having children of their own, any deviation from this and they are "turned to the dark side" and their former peers are sent to eliminate them as an enemy; all for the sake of order. Not how they would have you believe it. But this inability to adapt and quest for order and control indicates a misuse of the Force. The sentient Force would therefore have balance be to get rid of these old ideas that seem to have strayed from the point and unfortunately it is so ingrained the extermination is required. Cue Anakin. His wiping out of the Jedi and then of Palpatine led the way for Luke to create the New Jedi Order which was open and inclusive. Essentially Order 66 and Anakin's final act before dying can be likened to the Great Flood of the Noah's Ark story. Also the only people distinguishable after becoming one with the Force, have all at some point embraced this concept: Qui-Gon Jinn was willing to train Anakin even though he was older and made an illegal bet because it was necessary, Obi-Wan was also willing to train Anakin and Luke and also harboured emotions for Anakin (more brotherly bond than a student-teacher one), Yoda eventually trained Luke out of necessity despite his age and emotional state, and Anakin himself for too many reasons to count. Wow. That is one massive wall of text! -- youngcosette

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*** What I personally think on the matter of the "balance issue" is that it is essentially a reset button. We mustn't focus on the fact that all the Jedi and Sith died but WHY they died. This reason is misuse of the Force. This is more obvious in the Sith than in the Jedi. The Jedi are steadfast in their old ways without being open to new ones and adapting likewise. In fact think of it this way: an organization who only accepts infants as members whom they will then train to use a specific elite skill-set that cannot be used by those not chosen, they are also taught a strict set of beliefs that includes forbidding them from exhibiting emotion and having children of their own, any deviation from this and they are "turned to the dark side" and their former peers are sent to eliminate them as an enemy; all for the sake of order. Not how they would have you believe it. But this inability to adapt and quest for order and control indicates a misuse of the Force. The sentient Force would therefore have balance be to get rid of these old ideas that seem to have strayed from the point and unfortunately it is so ingrained the extermination is required. Cue Anakin. His wiping out of the Jedi and then of Palpatine led the way for Luke to create the New Jedi Order which was open and inclusive. Essentially Order 66 and Anakin's final act before dying can be likened to the Great Flood of the Noah's Ark story. Also the only people distinguishable after becoming one with the Force, have all at some point embraced this concept: Qui-Gon Jinn was willing to train Anakin even though he was older and made an illegal bet because it was necessary, Obi-Wan was also willing to train Anakin and Luke and also harboured emotions for Anakin (more brotherly bond than a student-teacher one), Yoda eventually trained Luke out of necessity despite his age and emotional state, and Anakin himself for too many reasons to count. Wow. That is one massive wall of text! -- youngcosette



*** I should know that even the numbers doesn't means "Balance". Sure there are as many Jedi as Sith, but the Sith have much more power and influence than the Jedi, so not balanced, at all. -- MakiP

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*** I should know that even the numbers doesn't means "Balance". Sure there are as many Jedi as Sith, but the Sith have much more power and influence than the Jedi, so not balanced, at all. -- MakiP



* A just-realized moment of my own: The "Vader" in Darth Vader is, in the real world, the Dutch word for "Father." In the Original Trilogy, this was merely a foreshadowing hint to Vader's true identity. However, in the Prequel Trilogy, where Palpatine grants him the name, the father meaning seems to not be present. But then I realized: Anakin's fall to the Dark Side resulted because of his desire to save his wife and unborn child. He fell because he was acting as a husband and father. The name Vader takes on a much greater meaning now I realize that. -- {{Sgamer82}}

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* A just-realized moment of my own: The "Vader" in Darth Vader is, in the real world, the Dutch word for "Father." In the Original Trilogy, this was merely a foreshadowing hint to Vader's true identity. However, in the Prequel Trilogy, where Palpatine grants him the name, the father meaning seems to not be present. But then I realized: Anakin's fall to the Dark Side resulted because of his desire to save his wife and unborn child. He fell because he was acting as a husband and father. The name Vader takes on a much greater meaning now I realize that. -- {{Sgamer82}}



** Actually, according to WordOfGod, the "Vader is Luke's father" element didn't exist at the time the first film was written (in fact, it wasn't even in the first draft of ''Empire''!), so that really must be chalked up to coincidence. --StarManta

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** Actually, according to WordOfGod, the "Vader is Luke's father" element didn't exist at the time the first film was written (in fact, it wasn't even in the first draft of ''Empire''!), so that really must be chalked up to coincidence. --StarManta



* This one concerns the much-derided moment in ''Return of the Jedi'' when Palpatine congratulates Luke on losing control of his anger, [[YourApprovalFillsMeWithShame thus reminding Luke that he had to control himself]]. It seems like a moment of complete idiocy on Palpatine's part... ''and it is''. That moment illustrates why the Sith's adherence to their own emotions can be a weakness instead of the strength they claim it is: without Jedi self-control, Palpatine couldn't contain his glee at being so close to his ultimate goal... and that momentary lapse made him lose it all. --{{Anomaly}}

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* This one concerns the much-derided moment in ''Return of the Jedi'' when Palpatine congratulates Luke on losing control of his anger, [[YourApprovalFillsMeWithShame thus reminding Luke that he had to control himself]]. It seems like a moment of complete idiocy on Palpatine's part... ''and it is''. That moment illustrates why the Sith's adherence to their own emotions can be a weakness instead of the strength they claim it is: without Jedi self-control, Palpatine couldn't contain his glee at being so close to his ultimate goal... and that momentary lapse made him lose it all. --{{Anomaly}}



*** Yeah, Padme's been [[{{TheWomanWearingTheQueenlyMask}} the woman wearing the Queenly mask]] since she was [[AChildShallLeadThem fourteen]]. She had to learn how to mask, and at times [[TheStoic hide]] her emotions in order to be taken seriously. Being ruled by her emotions was a big no-no.--ncfan

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*** Yeah, Padme's been [[{{TheWomanWearingTheQueenlyMask}} the woman wearing the Queenly mask]] since she was [[AChildShallLeadThem fourteen]]. She had to learn how to mask, and at times [[TheStoic hide]] her emotions in order to be taken seriously. Being ruled by her emotions was a big no-no.--ncfan



* Up until ROTS, this troper used to think Vader's black lenses were [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin just that]]. But as his mask is being lowered, we see the lenses show red and black LCD. Red and black were the two dominant colors of Mustafar, so as Vader, Anakin sees the world looking just like the one which changed him forever. It lends a greater impact to his line "Let me look on you with my own eyes". - Tropers/{{Premonition45}}
** It also looks like fire as we see the mask descending over him, symbolizing Anakin's descent into Hell.--ncfan
* I realized something about the OT: Luke's first and last spoken lines in the OT have to do with choice. In ''ANH'', when we first meet Luke, his Aunt Beru asks him to remind him to tell his Uncle Owen to make sure a translator droid can speak Bocce, to which Luke says "Doesn't look like we have much of a choice, but I'll remind him". And towards the end of ''ROTJ'', he says "Father, I won't leave you" as his redeemed father Anakin dies. - Tropers/{{Premonition45}}
* There is one very powerful theme that crosses almost the entire saga and can only be fully understood by putting both trilogies together. In Episode III Obi-Wan suggests that he raises Luke himself while Yoda says no, that he should be raised outside of the Jedi life. This is elaborated more in the novelization, where Yoda believes that he lost the duel with Sidious because he had spent his life trying to hold on to past Jedi tradition while the Sith learned to evolve. In the case of Anakin, the Jedi life was forced upon him and he constantly resented it (taken away from his mother, forbidden from marrying Padme, etc). Because of this, whenever he made a personal choice he was always worried of the backlash. In the case of Luke, when offered the chance to leave Tatooine he told Obi-Wan that he has responsibilities on the farm. Obi-Wan's reply (with a distinct sense of regret) was "You must do what you feel is right." And when Luke approached Yoda, the little guy practically made Luke beg to be trained, to ensure that he wasn't going to go at it half-assed. Because of this, whenever Luke made a personal choice he always seemed to do so with resolve and dedication. And then in the ExpandedUniverse Luke's new Jedi Order emphasized the importance of evolution and learning over ancient tradition. The ''StarWars'' saga is a message about the dangers of blind tradition and the importance of personal choice. George Lucas said he wanted to tell his story, and this is what it is. --KJMackley
** And one line that perfectly enhances that theme is in ''Film/ANewHope''. When Luke is disappointed to learn that Han and Chewie will not stay to help the Rebels fight the Death Star, Leia tells him that "He [Han] has got to follow his own path. No one can choose it for him." - Tropers/{{Premonition45}}
** The Yoda theory is confirmed in the Thrawn Trilogy; when Luke is reflecting on the passing of Obi-Wan's ghost, he claims he is the last of of the Jedi... then he hears Obi-Wan's voice "Not the last of the old jedi, but the first of the new" --SeekerofAlice09

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* Up until ROTS, this troper used to think Vader's black lenses were [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin just that]]. But as his mask is being lowered, we see the lenses show red and black LCD. Red and black were the two dominant colors of Mustafar, so as Vader, Anakin sees the world looking just like the one which changed him forever. It lends a greater impact to his line "Let me look on you with my own eyes". - Tropers/{{Premonition45}}
eyes".
** It also looks like fire as we see the mask descending over him, symbolizing Anakin's descent into Hell.--ncfan
Hell.
* I realized something about the OT: Luke's first and last spoken lines in the OT have to do with choice. In ''ANH'', when we first meet Luke, his Aunt Beru asks him to remind him to tell his Uncle Owen to make sure a translator droid can speak Bocce, to which Luke says "Doesn't look like we have much of a choice, but I'll remind him". And towards the end of ''ROTJ'', he says "Father, I won't leave you" as his redeemed father Anakin dies. - Tropers/{{Premonition45}}\n
* There is one very powerful theme that crosses almost the entire saga and can only be fully understood by putting both trilogies together. In Episode III Obi-Wan suggests that he raises Luke himself while Yoda says no, that he should be raised outside of the Jedi life. This is elaborated more in the novelization, where Yoda believes that he lost the duel with Sidious because he had spent his life trying to hold on to past Jedi tradition while the Sith learned to evolve. In the case of Anakin, the Jedi life was forced upon him and he constantly resented it (taken away from his mother, forbidden from marrying Padme, etc). Because of this, whenever he made a personal choice he was always worried of the backlash. In the case of Luke, when offered the chance to leave Tatooine he told Obi-Wan that he has responsibilities on the farm. Obi-Wan's reply (with a distinct sense of regret) was "You must do what you feel is right." And when Luke approached Yoda, the little guy practically made Luke beg to be trained, to ensure that he wasn't going to go at it half-assed. Because of this, whenever Luke made a personal choice he always seemed to do so with resolve and dedication. And then in the ExpandedUniverse Luke's new Jedi Order emphasized the importance of evolution and learning over ancient tradition. The ''StarWars'' saga is a message about the dangers of blind tradition and the importance of personal choice. George Lucas said he wanted to tell his story, and this is what it is. --KJMackley\n
** And one line that perfectly enhances that theme is in ''Film/ANewHope''. When Luke is disappointed to learn that Han and Chewie will not stay to help the Rebels fight the Death Star, Leia tells him that "He [Han] has got to follow his own path. No one can choose it for him." - Tropers/{{Premonition45}}
"
** The Yoda theory is confirmed in the Thrawn Trilogy; when Luke is reflecting on the passing of Obi-Wan's ghost, he claims he is the last of of the Jedi... then he hears Obi-Wan's voice "Not the last of the old jedi, but the first of the new" --SeekerofAlice09



*** You noticed that too? I figured out a theory recently on what 'balance' could possibly mean to the Force, which seems to be more like the life energy of the entire galaxy: if the Force itself is alive, how could a stagnant, hyper-controlling and unchanging Jedi Order possibly be ''good'' for it? In nature, stagnation usually equals death. The Sith philosophy seems like a good alternative in theory, but the way the Dark Side corrupts and perverts life makes it seem more like a cancer - growth for the sake of growth, power for the sake of power. Anakin's entire life was forcing the Force to act more dynamically, to encourage healthy development. - OracleSeven

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*** You noticed that too? I figured out a theory recently on what 'balance' could possibly mean to the Force, which seems to be more like the life energy of the entire galaxy: if the Force itself is alive, how could a stagnant, hyper-controlling and unchanging Jedi Order possibly be ''good'' for it? In nature, stagnation usually equals death. The Sith philosophy seems like a good alternative in theory, but the way the Dark Side corrupts and perverts life makes it seem more like a cancer - growth for the sake of growth, power for the sake of power. Anakin's entire life was forcing the Force to act more dynamically, to encourage healthy development. - OracleSeven



* George Lucas was inspired by many things in creating Star Wars: the old Buck Rogers serials, Joseph Campbell books on mythology, Japanese Samurai movies like ''The Hidden Fortress'' on so on. It just occurred to me that Lucas may also have been inspired by Medieval tales like the King Arthur legend as well: The union of Anakin is Padme is that of a knight (a Jedi Knight) and a lady (Queen-turned-senator), and Palpatine is in effect an evil sorcerer of sorts. Obi-Wan perhaps played the Merlin role, as did Yoda. - {{Tropers.Jedd-the-Jedi}}

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* George Lucas was inspired by many things in creating Star Wars: the old Buck Rogers serials, Joseph Campbell books on mythology, Japanese Samurai movies like ''The Hidden Fortress'' on so on. It just occurred to me that Lucas may also have been inspired by Medieval tales like the King Arthur legend as well: The union of Anakin is Padme is that of a knight (a Jedi Knight) and a lady (Queen-turned-senator), and Palpatine is in effect an evil sorcerer of sorts. Obi-Wan perhaps played the Merlin role, as did Yoda. - {{Tropers.Jedd-the-Jedi}}



* Also, I'm not sure if this was already mentioned here, (and it's not exactly easy to look through the list) but I think it's arguably FridgeBrilliance that when it comes to lightsaber colours, Qui-Gon uses green, Obi-Wan uses blue, and Luke Skywalker uses blue in Film/TheEmpireStrikesBack and green in ''Film/ReturnOfTheJedi''. [[spoiler:Also, Qui-Gon was more trusting of Anakin than Obi-Wan was, much like how Luke was more trusting of Vader in ''Film/ReturnOfTheJedi'' than he was in Film/TheEmpireStrikesBack.]] - [=neoYTPism=]

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* Also, I'm not sure if this was already mentioned here, (and it's not exactly easy to look through the list) but I think it's arguably FridgeBrilliance that when it comes to lightsaber colours, Qui-Gon uses green, Obi-Wan uses blue, and Luke Skywalker uses blue in Film/TheEmpireStrikesBack and green in ''Film/ReturnOfTheJedi''. [[spoiler:Also, Qui-Gon was more trusting of Anakin than Obi-Wan was, much like how Luke was more trusting of Vader in ''Film/ReturnOfTheJedi'' than he was in Film/TheEmpireStrikesBack.]] - [=neoYTPism=]



* Another thing, and this sort of combines FridgeHorror with FridgeBrilliance... in the original trilogy, Palpatine and Vader seem perfectly aware of the Force, and Vader is shown mentioning it to other Imperial officers in ''Film/ANewHope'', but they seem to perceive it as just another religion. However, they (or at least some of them) also seem to be aware that the Jedi were mostly wiped out, as implied by one of Tarkin's conversations with Vader, in which Tarkin says ''"you, my friend, are all that is left of their religion."'' Now think about this in light of the prequel trilogy. ''"Order 66"'' was already [[MoralEventHorizon heinous]], but we know from the context that it was at least somewhat pragmatic; Palpatine wiped out the Jedi because they were the only rivals to himself and Vader in knowledge of the force. Tarkin, however, not believing in the force, is probably unaware that this was the reason. Now think about what he said once more. ''"All that is left of their religion."'' In other words, he [[ANaziByAnyOtherName condones having people rounded up and killed for their religious beliefs]]. Sure, we knew he was bad news from the start, [[PoliticallyIncorrectVillain but still]]... - [=neoYTPism=]

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* Another thing, and this sort of combines FridgeHorror with FridgeBrilliance... in the original trilogy, Palpatine and Vader seem perfectly aware of the Force, and Vader is shown mentioning it to other Imperial officers in ''Film/ANewHope'', but they seem to perceive it as just another religion. However, they (or at least some of them) also seem to be aware that the Jedi were mostly wiped out, as implied by one of Tarkin's conversations with Vader, in which Tarkin says ''"you, my friend, are all that is left of their religion."'' Now think about this in light of the prequel trilogy. ''"Order 66"'' was already [[MoralEventHorizon heinous]], but we know from the context that it was at least somewhat pragmatic; Palpatine wiped out the Jedi because they were the only rivals to himself and Vader in knowledge of the force. Tarkin, however, not believing in the force, is probably unaware that this was the reason. Now think about what he said once more. ''"All that is left of their religion."'' In other words, he [[ANaziByAnyOtherName condones having people rounded up and killed for their religious beliefs]]. Sure, we knew he was bad news from the start, [[PoliticallyIncorrectVillain but still]]... - [=neoYTPism=]



*** Of course he doesn't mind. This is the guy who blew up a planet as a mere show of force, so clearly empathy is not his strong suit. -Tropers/UmbraFractus

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*** Of course he doesn't mind. This is the guy who blew up a planet as a mere show of force, so clearly empathy is not his strong suit. -Tropers/UmbraFractus



* Another case of FridgeBrilliance, you know how people often complain that Anakin's personality in ''Film/ThePhantomMenace'' seemed so contradictory to his original-trilogy personality, and that both personalities seemed contradictory to the personality he had in ''Film/AttackOfTheClones'' and ''Film/RevengeOfTheSith''... but then again, [[TruthInTelevision adults often ARE quite different as adults than they were as children]], so Anakin's going to have different personalities as a child, as a teenager, and as an adult. ''Film/ThePhantomMenace'''s Anakin was a child, so he's going to be more sweet and friendly than he was later on. The Anakin of ''Film/AttackOfTheClones'' and ''Film/RevengeOfTheSith'' was a teenager, so he's going to be more whiny and arrogant than he was later or earlier on. The Vader of the original trilogy was an adult, much older than the Anakin of ''Film/RevengeOfTheSith'', so he's going to be more mature than any other version of Anakin. This is, if not perfectly in line with actual age difference, at least in line with PERCEIVED age differences, and if one is to complain about this, their real complaint is with popular age stereotypes, not ''Franchise/StarWars'' movies. - [=neoYTPism=]

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* Another case of FridgeBrilliance, you know how people often complain that Anakin's personality in ''Film/ThePhantomMenace'' seemed so contradictory to his original-trilogy personality, and that both personalities seemed contradictory to the personality he had in ''Film/AttackOfTheClones'' and ''Film/RevengeOfTheSith''... but then again, [[TruthInTelevision adults often ARE quite different as adults than they were as children]], so Anakin's going to have different personalities as a child, as a teenager, and as an adult. ''Film/ThePhantomMenace'''s Anakin was a child, so he's going to be more sweet and friendly than he was later on. The Anakin of ''Film/AttackOfTheClones'' and ''Film/RevengeOfTheSith'' was a teenager, so he's going to be more whiny and arrogant than he was later or earlier on. The Vader of the original trilogy was an adult, much older than the Anakin of ''Film/RevengeOfTheSith'', so he's going to be more mature than any other version of Anakin. This is, if not perfectly in line with actual age difference, at least in line with PERCEIVED age differences, and if one is to complain about this, their real complaint is with popular age stereotypes, not ''Franchise/StarWars'' movies. - [=neoYTPism=]



* For a long time, the idea of "spice mines" seemed to be just a bit of silliness I quietly ignored. Mining spices? How ridiculous can you get? Then I realized that far from being stupid, it's perfectly reasonable. The most common spice in the world is salt, and do we get salt? From mines! - {{Tropers/Whitewings}}

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* For a long time, the idea of "spice mines" seemed to be just a bit of silliness I quietly ignored. Mining spices? How ridiculous can you get? Then I realized that far from being stupid, it's perfectly reasonable. The most common spice in the world is salt, and do we get salt? From mines! - {{Tropers/Whitewings}}



* [[WebVideo/TheAmazingAtheist The Distressed Watcher]] claims that seeing the Jedi act like bureaucrats in the prequels didn't line up with the way they were described by characters in the original trilogy. Think about it, though... how often in real life do people who view old traditions through rose-tinted glasses know what they're talking about? Perhaps the point very well was to imply that Obi-Wan's fondness for the past was very much like that which some people have for the [=1950s=] in real life? - Tropers/HiddenFacedMatt

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* [[WebVideo/TheAmazingAtheist The Distressed Watcher]] claims that seeing the Jedi act like bureaucrats in the prequels didn't line up with the way they were described by characters in the original trilogy. Think about it, though... how often in real life do people who view old traditions through rose-tinted glasses know what they're talking about? Perhaps the point very well was to imply that Obi-Wan's fondness for the past was very much like that which some people have for the [=1950s=] in real life? - Tropers/HiddenFacedMatt



* As many others, I sometimes wondered: why did the Death Star had to wait for Yavin IV to come into range instead of blowing Yavin itself and having a free shot. But then it occurred to me: Yavin is a gas giant. It means it is mostly hydrogen. It is also way bigger than Jupiter, judging by view from the base. Had the Death Star blown it off like Alderaan, the shock would cause all the hydrogen to fuse, essentially making Yavin into one '''huge''' nuke. The resulting explosion would be likely orders of magnitude stronger, and would blast the Death Star (which was sitting directly on top of Yavin and has crappy shields) to bits. -- Tropers/{{SS13}}

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* As many others, I sometimes wondered: why did the Death Star had to wait for Yavin IV to come into range instead of blowing Yavin itself and having a free shot. But then it occurred to me: Yavin is a gas giant. It means it is mostly hydrogen. It is also way bigger than Jupiter, judging by view from the base. Had the Death Star blown it off like Alderaan, the shock would cause all the hydrogen to fuse, essentially making Yavin into one '''huge''' nuke. The resulting explosion would be likely orders of magnitude stronger, and would blast the Death Star (which was sitting directly on top of Yavin and has crappy shields) to bits. -- Tropers/{{SS13}}



* Rewatching TPM, I realized the theme playing during Qui-Gonn's funeral is, in fact, the same theme playing during the birth of Darth Vader in ROTS. Vader was born the moment Qui-Gon had died. -- Tropers/{{Premonition45}}

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* Rewatching TPM, I realized the theme playing during Qui-Gonn's funeral is, in fact, the same theme playing during the birth of Darth Vader in ROTS. Vader was born the moment Qui-Gon had died. -- Tropers/{{Premonition45}}



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* Kyle Katarn's entire character morality is one huge moment of brilliance
** People like to bring up how the non-canon ending of 'Dark Forces 2' and the subsequent events of 'Mysteries Of The Sith' make no sense, as Kyle falls to the Dark Side so easily that it's almost comical. Except... how did Kyle begin his career? As a Stormtrooper working under the Empire, slaughtering Rebels who dared defy the rule of the Imperials. Why did Kyle then join the Rebels? Out of anger, because he discovered that the Imperials were the ones who killed his father (while the Imperials had told him it was the Rebels). Thus Kyle's entire life at that point had been anger, misguided or otherwise.
** Then cosnider how Luke was able to resist the Dark Side, as well as Mara when she rescued Kyle in the finale of 'Mysteries Of The Sith'. Both Luke and Mara had, between them, varying degrees of Jedi training. Mara, from the Emperor, and Luke, from Obi-Wan and Yoda. Mara even had some training from Kyle, except Kyle himself had no training. The best he had was some advice given to him from Rahn during the events of 'Dark Forces 2' and a lot of improvisation. Kyle, as such, would have had no real instruction on the temptations of the Dark Side and how easy it can be to fall to it
** Thus it becomes all too easy for Kyle to be swayed, as he still carries that deep core of hatred inside himself, and has no true understanding of how to resist the seductive pull of the Dark Side, hence why Kyle can fall so easily. He's permanently walking the line between light and dark

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* A lot of people probably wondered why the Jedi order in the prequel trilogy seemed like a bunch of ineffectual, pompous, self-rightous, hypocritical jerks as apposed to the stalwart defenders of the innocent and warriors against evil they were stated to be in the legends. The reason is because by the time of the clone wars, the jedi order was on the decline. Since they thought the sith were gone, they believed that they only has to deal with the mundane problems of Muggles rather than fights between sci-fi [[MagicKnight magic knights]]. They stopped going out looking for evil because they believed that normal crime was something the republic could handle and they couldn't be arsed to get out of their temples to handle it. Had they gone out and been TheKnightErrant and fought all types of evil and crime, they might have gotten wise to the sith scheme to take over the universe sooner. Also, they got more and more entagled with the republic's affairs and came to rely on the republic as patrons too much worrying about public opinion and reprisals from government bodies that they actually just became and extension of the republic. They would even sell out one of their own on circumstancial evidence that have the republic be mad at them. Not to mention stuff like taking force sensitive children from their families because they, the jedi, [[SarcasmMode obviously new better than the families of said children.]] In fact it was that whole "we're jedi, we know better than all of you" attitude that really showcased their pride and arrogance. By the time of the prequels, we weren't looking at a BadassArmy of [[SpaceWizard space]] [[ThePaladin paladins]]. We were looking at church full of self-rightous ascetics that got soft in peaceful times [[TradeYourPassionForGlory and were content practicing the tenents of their religion rather than adhere to the spirit of that religion.]]



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* [[Fridge/TheRiseOfSkywalker Episode Nine: The Rise of Skywalker]]


** The novelization makes this motivation explicit. It's not the only thing it clears up either. The reason the prequels are regarded so poorly is because George Lucas took too much of the subtext, background, and motivation for his characters for granted and never bothered to explain to the audience what was going on half the time. This was likely an effect of having lived in this world and with these characters for YEARS; Lucas was so close to the material he lost the ability to asses it objectively. Had he let another director handle the prequels it is likely they would have been far superior in quality, and not nearly as loathed as they are (at least among the general public, I'm sure just as many fanboys would be [[FanDumb upset]] at the new movies upsetting the {{Fanon}})

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** The novelization makes this motivation explicit. It's not the only thing it clears up either. The reason the prequels are regarded so poorly is because George Lucas took too much of the subtext, background, and motivation for his characters for granted and never bothered to explain to the audience what was going on half the time. This was likely an effect of having lived in this world and with these characters for YEARS; Lucas was so close to the material he lost the ability to asses it objectively. Had he let another director handle the prequels it is likely they would have been far superior in quality, and not nearly as loathed as they are (at least among the general public, I'm sure just as many fanboys would be [[FanDumb upset]] upset at the new movies upsetting the {{Fanon}})


** Another theory, playing on RealLife concerns: A study of firefights in modern wars show that in every situation, even the most vicious, no-mercy firefight, most shots miss, even if the soldiers are trained. Why? [[CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming Even if trained and indoctrinated, studies have shown that most human beings, save for sociopaths, do not want to will harm to other humans on a subconscious level]]. They may be missing unconsciously because they see human beings and not Rebel traitors. Add to that the military doctrine of "suppression fire" (where solders are trained to fire wildly, not with the object of actually hitting anything, but to make the opposition so concerned with keeping under cover that they don't have the opportunity to return fire, and that may be a simpler explanation.

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** Another theory, playing on RealLife concerns: A study of firefights in modern wars show that in every situation, even the most vicious, no-mercy firefight, most shots miss, even if the soldiers are trained. Why? [[CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming [[SugarWiki/HeartwarmingMoments Even if trained and indoctrinated, studies have shown that most human beings, save for sociopaths, do not want to will harm to other humans on a subconscious level]]. They may be missing unconsciously because they see human beings and not Rebel traitors. Add to that the military doctrine of "suppression fire" (where solders are trained to fire wildly, not with the object of actually hitting anything, but to make the opposition so concerned with keeping under cover that they don't have the opportunity to return fire, and that may be a simpler explanation.


* A lot of people forget how one of Palpatine's statements comes full circle. In ''Film/ReturnOfTheSith'', a DEEP emphasis is put on what he says as it cuts to a close-up of him saying in a sinister way, "It's ironic... He could save others from death but not himself." Fast forward to the end of the movie when Anakin was literally dying on Mustafar, only to be saved by Sidious and get turned into the "Original" Darth Vader. Now, let's fast forward again, this time to ''Film/ReturnOfTheJedi'' when Vader threw Sidious down the generator shaft. "He could save OTHERS from DEATH but NOT HIMSELF."

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* A lot of people forget how one of Palpatine's statements comes full circle. In ''Film/ReturnOfTheSith'', ''Film/RevengeOfTheSith'', a DEEP emphasis is put on what he says as it cuts to a close-up of him saying in a sinister way, "It's ironic... He could save others from death but not himself." Fast forward to the end of the movie when Anakin was literally dying on Mustafar, only to be saved by Sidious and get turned into the "Original" Darth Vader. Now, let's fast forward again, this time to ''Film/ReturnOfTheJedi'' when Vader threw Sidious down the generator shaft. "He could save OTHERS from DEATH but NOT HIMSELF."



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* A lot of people forget how one of Palpatine's statements comes full circle. In ''Film/ReturnOfTheSith'', a DEEP emphasis is put on what he says as it cuts to a close-up of him saying in a sinister way, "It's ironic... He could save others from death but not himself." Fast forward to the end of the movie when Anakin was literally dying on Mustafar, only to be saved by Sidious and get turned into the "Original" Darth Vader. Now, let's fast forward again, this time to ''Film/ReturnOfTheJedi'' when Vader threw Sidious down the generator shaft. "He could save OTHERS from DEATH but NOT HIMSELF."


*** And who would expect a small town boy like George Lucas to recognize the UnfortunateImplications of it?
*** Even if Modesto was actually a small town, by the time ''The Phantom Menace'' was in production, George Lucas was a multimillionnaire writer and producer.
*** There would only be a problem if actual Jamaicans saw problems with it. Since Jar Jar's portrayal isn't relying heavily on negative stereotypes, it isn't an example.

Added DiffLines:

* In the prequel trilogy, the Jedi, while powerful and the good guys for the most part, don't seem anything like how they are described in the legends of their order or how they are presented to others. They're immersed in politics, bicker about trivial things, seem to grab the IdiotBall one too many times, more often then not stand back as evil triumphs, and seem to be a far cry from the great warriors of light and keepers of the piece that they're supposed to be. This makes perfect sense as without the Sith order around to fight epic battles with, they are relegated to handling more mundane criminal activity and problems. They have to justify their existence and at the same time prove their worth the their patron, the republic. More than that, their strict adherence to tradition and dogma in lew of practicality and common sense pushes the order into decline as they won't adapt with the times and seem to cling to the past. What we see in the prequel trilogy aren't the grand heroes of old struggling for the survival of freedom and peace but a bunch of tight-assed religious monks with nothing serious to do as most of the threats that emerge are things a normal government could handle. The current Jedi barring a few exceptions are ascetics and practitioners of a religion, not tempered warriors of justice.


** There is also the possibility that the Stormtroopers weapons are just plain garbage. This parallels real life WW2 France, and the homemade Sten gun. Made out of any piping available, including bicycle pumps and sewer pipe, the Sten was great for putting out bullets, but had very low accuracy. The Empire requires a lot of weapons, so of course the lowest bidder is going to get the job. Imagine if Winchester suddenly started mass-producing arms in China, the overall quality would most definitely suffer. Now, take that analogy to a ''galaxy-wide'' level, and it is possible that all of the weapons the Empire gives to rank-and-file soldiers is not going to be top-tier equipment. Note how none of the characters willingly use a Stormtrooper rifle (with the exception of Luke, but he didn't have a personal weapon besides a laser sword he could barely use, and even then he hit only 2-3 Troopers in the entire escape) at any point, Han ditches it at the first opportunity for his personal side-arm which has proven much more reliable.

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** There is also the possibility that the Stormtroopers weapons are just plain garbage. This parallels real life WW2 [=WW2=] France, and the homemade Sten gun. Made out of any piping available, including bicycle pumps and sewer pipe, the Sten was great for putting out bullets, but had very low accuracy. The Empire requires a lot of weapons, so of course the lowest bidder is going to get the job. Imagine if Winchester suddenly started mass-producing arms in China, the overall quality would most definitely suffer. Now, take that analogy to a ''galaxy-wide'' level, and it is possible that all of the weapons the Empire gives to rank-and-file soldiers is not going to be top-tier equipment. Note how none of the characters willingly use a Stormtrooper rifle (with the exception of Luke, but he didn't have a personal weapon besides a laser sword he could barely use, and even then he hit only 2-3 Troopers in the entire escape) at any point, Han ditches it at the first opportunity for his personal side-arm which has proven much more reliable.



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* I was reading an article about how in Solo Han was portrayed as a gary sue, just like Rey is considered a mary sue. why do we keep getting Mary/Gary Sue's (because Anakin, certainly in episode 1 could be considered that)? The force wants them in certain places, at certain times, to do specific things, so it gifts them with the skills they need to get there, the force itself may be the biggest manipulator in the franchise!



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* [[Fridge/TheLastJedi Episode Eight: The Last Jedi]]


*** Personally I've always seen it more as '''Palpatine''' being the imbalance in the Force. I mean, think about it, the Force isn't in balance when Palpatine and Vader die, there's still Luke, who is a Jedi. Going by the view that it's about the Jedi/Sith being in balance, there's simply no evidence that the Force is in balance, because there are more Jedi than Sith at the end of the movies. Plus, as the StarWarsExpandedUniverse shows us, the Jedi aren't the be all and end all of Force users, they're just the most famous group. So yeah, Palps is the imbalance, because when he dies, the Force is balanced once more.

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*** Personally I've always seen it more as '''Palpatine''' being the imbalance in the Force. I mean, think about it, the Force isn't in balance when Palpatine and Vader die, there's still Luke, who is a Jedi. Going by the view that it's about the Jedi/Sith being in balance, there's simply no evidence that the Force is in balance, because there are more Jedi than Sith at the end of the movies. Plus, as the StarWarsExpandedUniverse Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse shows us, the Jedi aren't the be all and end all of Force users, they're just the most famous group. So yeah, Palps is the imbalance, because when he dies, the Force is balanced once more.



* When Han, Leia, and the others get captured on Bespin, we see Han being tortured while Chewie and 3PO are in a cell. Leia is brought to the cell only after Han is. Where was Leia? Also being tortured. Why does she seem less affected by it than Han? First, because she's been tortured before, when a prisoner on the Death Star in Episode IV, and because she's been trained to withstand interrogation. But there's no question that she was being tortured. The horror is even worse than that, however. She was tortured by her ''father''. Imagine how it must have felt to find that out. Is it any wonder she won't forgive him in ''[[StarWarsExpandedUniverse Truce at Bakura]]''.

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* When Han, Leia, and the others get captured on Bespin, we see Han being tortured while Chewie and 3PO are in a cell. Leia is brought to the cell only after Han is. Where was Leia? Also being tortured. Why does she seem less affected by it than Han? First, because she's been tortured before, when a prisoner on the Death Star in Episode IV, and because she's been trained to withstand interrogation. But there's no question that she was being tortured. The horror is even worse than that, however. She was tortured by her ''father''. Imagine how it must have felt to find that out. Is it any wonder she won't forgive him in ''[[StarWarsExpandedUniverse Truce at Bakura]]''.''Literature/TheTruceAtBakura''.

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