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History Film / LetItBe

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* {{Recut}}: Peter Jackson's version of the film is, essentially, this from the same raw film footage and audio as the original film.

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* BlankStare: The infamous scene where Paul delivers an earnest talk to John about how the band is going stale and they need to shake things up by doing live shows. John simply stares at Paul blankly.


This film was released about a year later than planned; it took that long for there to be any consensus about what the accompanying album would be like. Unfortunately, it was an incomplete consensus; while Music/JohnLennon and Music/GeorgeHarrison were happy with it, [[Music/PaulMcCartney Paul McCartney]] wasn't even aware of the finishing touches until they were a ''fait accompli.'' This led to a chain of events that led to the film being released in May 1970--and ''after'' Paul had issued a press release saying he was leaving the band indefinitely. Instant HarsherInHindsight, since this film already depicted stressful relations between the Beatles.

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This The film was shot at Twickenham film studios and later at the Beatles' Apple Corps headquarters in London from January 2 to January 31, 1969. It was released about a year later than planned; it took that long for there to be any consensus about what the accompanying album would be like. Unfortunately, it was an incomplete consensus; while Music/JohnLennon and Music/GeorgeHarrison were happy with it, [[Music/PaulMcCartney Paul McCartney]] wasn't even aware of the finishing touches until they were a ''fait accompli.'' This led to a chain of events that led to the film being released in May 1970--and ''after'' Paul had issued a press release saying he was leaving the band indefinitely. Instant HarsherInHindsight, since this film already depicted stressful relations between the Beatles.


This film was long subject to KeepCirculatingTheTapes, because there was no home video release since a Laserdisc edition back in 1982. The long absence of ''Let It Be'' from home video was never been officially explained, although the most common rumor was that the surviving Beatles just didn't feel good about the film. However, on January 30, 2019, the fiftieth anniversary of the rooftop concert, an announcement was made that Creator/PeterJackson will organize a remaster and re-release of the original film, as well as create a new documentary from some 55 hours of raw footage from January 1969.

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This film was long subject to KeepCirculatingTheTapes, because there was no home video release since a Laserdisc edition back in 1982. The long absence of ''Let It Be'' from home video was never been officially explained, although the most common rumor was that the surviving Beatles just didn't feel good about the film. However, on January 30, 2019, the fiftieth anniversary of the rooftop concert, an announcement was made that Creator/PeterJackson will organize a remaster and re-release of the original film, as well as create a new documentary from some 55 hours of raw footage from January 1969.


KeepCirculatingTheTapes, as this film has not been released on home video since a Laserdisc edition back in 1982. The long absence of ''Let It Be'' from home video has never been officially explained, but the unofficial explanation is that [[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0065976/trivia the issues depicted in the movie are still too controversial after all these years]], and unresolved (probably unresolvable), so the movie will never again see release during the remaining two Beatles' lifetimes.

Well, until just recently. On January 30, 2019, the fiftieth anniversary of the rooftop concert, an announcement was made that alongside a new version of the film directed by Creator/PeterJackson, a remaster of the original film will finally see the light of day after fifty years.

to:

This film was long subject to KeepCirculatingTheTapes, as this film has not been released on because there was no home video release since a Laserdisc edition back in 1982. The long absence of ''Let It Be'' from home video has was never been officially explained, but although the unofficial explanation is most common rumor was that [[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0065976/trivia the issues depicted in the movie are still too controversial after all these years]], and unresolved (probably unresolvable), so the movie will never again see release during the remaining two Beatles' lifetimes.

Well, until
surviving Beatles just recently. On didn't feel good about the film. However, on January 30, 2019, the fiftieth anniversary of the rooftop concert, an announcement was made that alongside a new version of the film directed by Creator/PeterJackson, Creator/PeterJackson will organize a remaster and re-release of the original film will finally see the light film, as well as create a new documentary from some 55 hours of day after fifty years.raw footage from January 1969.

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Well, until just recently. On January 30, 2019, the fiftieth anniversary of the rooftop concert, an announcement was made that alongside a new version of the film directed by Creator/PeterJackson, a remaster of the original film will finally see the light of day after fifty years.


KeepCirculatingTheTapes, as this film has not been released on home video since a laserdisc edition back in TheNineties. The long absence of ''Let It Be'' from home video has never been officially explained, but the unofficial explanation is that [[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0065976/trivia the issues depicted in the movie are still too controversial after all these years]], and unresolved (probably unresolvable), so the movie will never again see release during the remaining two Beatles' lifetimes.

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KeepCirculatingTheTapes, as this film has not been released on home video since a laserdisc Laserdisc edition back in TheNineties.1982. The long absence of ''Let It Be'' from home video has never been officially explained, but the unofficial explanation is that [[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0065976/trivia the issues depicted in the movie are still too controversial after all these years]], and unresolved (probably unresolvable), so the movie will never again see release during the remaining two Beatles' lifetimes.


** This is why "One After 909" was performed during the sessions. It was originally written in 1963 by Lennon, recorded by the band, and set aside. So six years later when the band was making a concerted effort to get back to their 1962-63 sound, "One After 909" was revived, rehearsed, and performed/recorded on the Apple rooftop.

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** This is why "One After 909" was performed during the sessions. It was originally written Lennon wrote it in 1959, it became a staple of their early club dates, then they tried it at Abbey Road in 1963 by Lennon, (at the same session they recorded by "From Me to You") but didn't like the band, performance and set it aside. So six years later when the band was making a concerted effort to get back to their 1962-63 sound, "One After 909" was revived, rehearsed, and performed/recorded on the Apple rooftop.


** Lennon namedrops Music/BobDylan's "Like A Rolling Stone", the FBI, the CIA, the BBC, BB King, Doris Day and Scottish soccer player Matt Busby during "Dig It".

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** Lennon namedrops Music/BobDylan's "Like A Rolling Stone", the FBI, the CIA, the BBC, BB King, Doris Day Music/DorisDay and Scottish soccer player Matt Busby during "Dig It".


** George and Ringo work through "Octopus's Garden", another song that was set aside until ''Abbey Road'' (see Evolving Music below).

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** George and Ringo work through "Octopus's Garden", another song that was set aside until ''Abbey Road'' ''Music/AbbeyRoad'' (see Evolving Music below).



** We see the band running through a hard rock version of "Two of Us" during the Twickenham sessions. When they play the finished version in the studio, it is a mellow acoustic pop song.
** In one scene Ringo demonstrates his new composition "Octopus's Garden", which is pretty much only one verse. George, inspired, goes to a piano and pounds out the chords that became the song's chorus (the "We would be so happy, you and me" part). John Lennon then sits down and plays drums, something he never did on an official Beatles recording.

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** We see the band running through a hard rock {{hard rock}} version of "Two of Us" during the Twickenham sessions. When they play the finished version in the studio, it is a mellow acoustic pop song.
** In one scene Ringo demonstrates his new composition "Octopus's Garden", which is pretty much only one verse. George, inspired, goes to a piano and pounds out the chords that became the song's chorus (the "We would be so happy, you and me" part). John Lennon then sits down and plays drums, something he never did only once on an official Beatles recording.recording ([[Music/TheWhiteAlbum Back in the U.S.S.R."]]).


* ChangedForTheVideo: The filmed performances of "Let It Be" and "The Long and Winding Road" are different from the versions which were later released. The "Let It Be" recording, both single and album versions, is based on take 27-A from the Jan. 31, 1969 session. The film version, which has never been released as an audio recording, was the next take, 27-B. In the filmed video, [=McCartney=] sings "there will be no sorrow" in the last verse instead of "there will be an answer". Similarly, the filmed performance of "The Long and Winding Road" is from the Jan. 31 session, while the released song is based off a recording from five days earlier. Also, the live performance is in accordance with Paul's original conception of the song as a simple piano ballad, while the released version includes the stringed instruments and backing choir overdubbed by Phil Spector.

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* ChangedForTheVideo: The filmed performances of "Let It Be" and "The Long and Winding Road" are different from the versions which were later released.
**
The "Let It Be" recording, both single and album versions, is based on take 27-A from the Jan. 31, 1969 session. The film version, which has never been released as an audio recording, was the next take, 27-B. In the filmed video, [=McCartney=] sings "there will be no sorrow" in the last verse instead of "there will be an answer".
**
Similarly, the filmed performance of "The Long and Winding Road" is from the Jan. 31 session, while the released song is based off a recording from five days earlier. Also, the live performance is in accordance with Paul's original conception of the song as a simple piano ballad, while the released version includes the stringed instruments and backing choir overdubbed by Phil Spector.


KeepCirculatingTheTapes, as this film has not been released on home video since a laserdisc edition back in TheNineties. The long absence of ''Let It Be'' from home video has never been officially explained, although it may simply be that the surviving Beatles (three were still alive when the film went out of print) don't feel good about it.

to:

KeepCirculatingTheTapes, as this film has not been released on home video since a laserdisc edition back in TheNineties. The long absence of ''Let It Be'' from home video has never been officially explained, although it may simply be but the unofficial explanation is that [[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0065976/trivia the surviving Beatles (three were issues depicted in the movie are still alive when too controversial after all these years]], and unresolved (probably unresolvable), so the film went out of print) don't feel good about it.
movie will never again see release during the remaining two Beatles' lifetimes.


* "Maggie May", a Liverpool folk song which the Beatles often performed in their Quarrymen days.

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* ** "Maggie May", Mae", a Liverpool folk song which the Beatles often performed in their Quarrymen days.

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* "Maggie May", a Liverpool folk song which the Beatles often performed in their Quarrymen days.


* ChangedForTheVideo: The filmed performances of "Let It Be" and "The Long and Winding Road" are different from the versions which were later released. The "Let It Be" recording, both single and album versions, is based on take 27-A from the Jan. 31, 1969 session, while the film version, which has never been released as an audio recording, was the next take, 27-B. In the filmed video, [=McCartney=] sings "there will be no sorrow" in the last verse instead of "there will be an answer". Similarly, the filmed performance of "The Long and Winding Road" is from the Jan. 31 session, while the released song is based off a recording from five days earlier. Also, the live performance is in accordance with Paul's original conception of the song as a simple piano ballad, while the released version includes the stringed instruments and backing choir overdubbed by Phil Spector.

to:

* ChangedForTheVideo: The filmed performances of "Let It Be" and "The Long and Winding Road" are different from the versions which were later released. The "Let It Be" recording, both single and album versions, is based on take 27-A from the Jan. 31, 1969 session, while the session. The film version, which has never been released as an audio recording, was the next take, 27-B. In the filmed video, [=McCartney=] sings "there will be no sorrow" in the last verse instead of "there will be an answer". Similarly, the filmed performance of "The Long and Winding Road" is from the Jan. 31 session, while the released song is based off a recording from five days earlier. Also, the live performance is in accordance with Paul's original conception of the song as a simple piano ballad, while the released version includes the stringed instruments and backing choir overdubbed by Phil Spector.

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