Follow TV Tropes

Following

History Creator / RubySpears

Go To



* ''Series/AfterschoolSpecial'':''ABC Weekend Special'': Starting in 1979 with ''The Puppy Who Wanted a Boy'' until 1982's ''Miss Switch to the Rescue,'' Ruby-Spears would provide at least one animated feature a year for this anthology Saturday morning anthology series. They did so again in 1984 with ''Bad Cat,'' and then again in 1994 (with ''The Magic Paintbrush'') and 1995 (with ''Jirimpimbira: As African Folk Tale'').

to:

* ''Series/AfterschoolSpecial'':''ABC Weekend Special'': Starting in 1979 with ''The Puppy Who Wanted a Boy'' until 1982's ''Miss Switch to the Rescue,'' Ruby-Spears would provide at least one animated feature a year for this anthology Saturday morning anthology series. They did so again in 1984 with ''Bad Cat,'' and then again in 1994 (with ''The Magic Paintbrush'') and 1995 (with ''Jirimpimbira: As African Folk Tale'').


* ''Series/AfterschoolSpecial/'':''ABC Weekend Special'': Starting in 1979 with ''The Puppy Who Wanted a Boy'' until 1982's ''Miss Switch to the Rescue,'' Ruby-Spears would provide at least one animated feature a year for this anthology Saturday morning anthology series. They did so again in 1984 with ''Bad Cat,'' and then again in 1994 (with ''The Magic Paintbrush'') and 1995 (with ''Jirimpimbira: As African Folk Tale'').

to:

* ''Series/AfterschoolSpecial/'':''ABC ''Series/AfterschoolSpecial'':''ABC Weekend Special'': Starting in 1979 with ''The Puppy Who Wanted a Boy'' until 1982's ''Miss Switch to the Rescue,'' Ruby-Spears would provide at least one animated feature a year for this anthology Saturday morning anthology series. They did so again in 1984 with ''Bad Cat,'' and then again in 1994 (with ''The Magic Paintbrush'') and 1995 (with ''Jirimpimbira: As African Folk Tale'').


* ''Series/ABCAfterschoolSpecial/'':''ABC Weekend Special'': Starting in 1979 with ''The Puppy Who Wanted a Boy'' until 1982's ''Miss Switch to the Rescue,'' Ruby-Spears would provide at least one animated feature a year for this anthology Saturday morning anthology series. They did so again in 1984 with ''Bad Cat,'' and then again in 1994 (with ''The Magic Paintbrush'') and 1995 (with ''Jirimpimbira: As African Folk Tale'').

to:

* ''Series/ABCAfterschoolSpecial/'':''ABC ''Series/AfterschoolSpecial/'':''ABC Weekend Special'': Starting in 1979 with ''The Puppy Who Wanted a Boy'' until 1982's ''Miss Switch to the Rescue,'' Ruby-Spears would provide at least one animated feature a year for this anthology Saturday morning anthology series. They did so again in 1984 with ''Bad Cat,'' and then again in 1994 (with ''The Magic Paintbrush'') and 1995 (with ''Jirimpimbira: As African Folk Tale'').

Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/ABCAfterschoolSpecial/'':''ABC Weekend Special'': Starting in 1979 with ''The Puppy Who Wanted a Boy'' until 1982's ''Miss Switch to the Rescue,'' Ruby-Spears would provide at least one animated feature a year for this anthology Saturday morning anthology series. They did so again in 1984 with ''Bad Cat,'' and then again in 1994 (with ''The Magic Paintbrush'') and 1995 (with ''Jirimpimbira: As African Folk Tale'').


Ruby-Spears is an animation house that was one of the more prolific animation studios of the late 1970s and throughout the 1980s. Studio founders Joe Ruby and Ken Spears started out as sound editors at Creator/HannaBarbera in the 1960s, eventually moving up the studio ladder into writing positions. This later led to the two creating the iconic ''Franchise/ScoobyDoo'' franchise for Hanna-Barbera, though they also played a part in many of Hanna-Barbera's successes before and after Scooby-Doo. While the pair did not have a "Created by" credit on ''Franchise/ScoobyDoo'' [[note]]Though they received writing credit in every episode's ending credits[[/note]], they did received a "Created By" credit for ''WesternAnimation/{{Jabberjaw}}'', and ''WesternAnimation/DynomuttDogWonder''[[note]]Which had CrossOver with Scooby-Doo.[[/note]]; they also co-created ''WesternAnimation/TheHoundcats'' and ''Bailey's Comets'' with and for [[Creator/DePatieFrelengEnterprises David [=DePatie=] and Friz Freleng]].) After CreativeDifferences with H-B, Ruby and Spears left the studio in 1971, with the two supervising Saturday morning programming for both Creator/{{CBS}} and later Creator/{{ABC}} before deciding to branch out on their own.

to:

Ruby-Spears is an American animation house that was one of the more prolific animation studios of the late 1970s and throughout the 1980s. Studio founders Joe Ruby and Ken Spears started out as sound editors at Creator/HannaBarbera in the 1960s, eventually moving up the studio ladder into writing positions. This later led to the two creating the iconic ''Franchise/ScoobyDoo'' franchise for Hanna-Barbera, though they also played a part in many of Hanna-Barbera's successes before and after Scooby-Doo. While the pair did not have a "Created by" credit on ''Franchise/ScoobyDoo'' [[note]]Though they received writing credit in every episode's ending credits[[/note]], they did received a "Created By" credit for ''WesternAnimation/{{Jabberjaw}}'', and ''WesternAnimation/DynomuttDogWonder''[[note]]Which had CrossOver with Scooby-Doo.[[/note]]; they also co-created ''WesternAnimation/TheHoundcats'' and ''Bailey's Comets'' with and for [[Creator/DePatieFrelengEnterprises David [=DePatie=] and Friz Freleng]].) After CreativeDifferences with H-B, Ruby and Spears left the studio in 1971, with the two supervising Saturday morning programming for both Creator/{{CBS}} and later Creator/{{ABC}} before deciding to branch out on their own.


Ruby-Spears is an animation house that was one of the more prolific animation studios of the late 1970s and throughout the 1980s. Studio founders Joe Ruby and Ken Spears started out as sound editors at Creator/HannaBarbera in the 1960s, eventually moving up the studio ladder into writing positions. This later led to the two creating the iconic ''Franchise/ScoobyDoo'' franchise for Hanna-Barbera, though they also played a part in many of Hanna-Barbera's successes before and after Scooby-Doo. While the pair did not have a "Created by" credit on ''Franchise/ScoobyDoo'' [[note]]Though they received writing credit in every episode's ending credits[[/note]], they did received a "Created By" credit for ''WesternAnimation/{{Jabberjaw}}'', and ''WesternAnimation/DynomuttDogWonder''[[note]]Which had CrossOver with Scooby-Doo.[[/note]]; they also co-created ''WesternAnimation/TheHoundcats'' and ''Bailey's Comets'' with and for [[Creator/DePatieFrelengEnterprises David [=DePatie=] and Friz Freleng]].) After CreativeDifferences with H-B, Ruby and Spears left the studio in 1971, supervising Saturday morning programming for both Creator/{{CBS}} and later Creator/{{ABC}} before deciding to branch out on their own.

to:

Ruby-Spears is an animation house that was one of the more prolific animation studios of the late 1970s and throughout the 1980s. Studio founders Joe Ruby and Ken Spears started out as sound editors at Creator/HannaBarbera in the 1960s, eventually moving up the studio ladder into writing positions. This later led to the two creating the iconic ''Franchise/ScoobyDoo'' franchise for Hanna-Barbera, though they also played a part in many of Hanna-Barbera's successes before and after Scooby-Doo. While the pair did not have a "Created by" credit on ''Franchise/ScoobyDoo'' [[note]]Though they received writing credit in every episode's ending credits[[/note]], they did received a "Created By" credit for ''WesternAnimation/{{Jabberjaw}}'', and ''WesternAnimation/DynomuttDogWonder''[[note]]Which had CrossOver with Scooby-Doo.[[/note]]; they also co-created ''WesternAnimation/TheHoundcats'' and ''Bailey's Comets'' with and for [[Creator/DePatieFrelengEnterprises David [=DePatie=] and Friz Freleng]].) After CreativeDifferences with H-B, Ruby and Spears left the studio in 1971, with the two supervising Saturday morning programming for both Creator/{{CBS}} and later Creator/{{ABC}} before deciding to branch out on their own.


Ruby-Spears is an animation house that was one of the more prolific animation studios of the late 1970s and throughout the 1980s. Studio founders Joe Ruby and Ken Spears started out as sound editors at Creator/HannaBarbera in the 1960s, eventually moving up the studio ladder into writing positions. This later led to the two creating the iconic ''Franchise/ScoobyDoo'' franchise for Hanna-Barbera, though they also played a part in many of Hanna-Barbera's successes before and after Scooby-Doo. While the pair did not have a "Created by" credit on ''Franchise/ScoobyDoo'' [[note]]Though they received writing credit in every episode's ending credits[[/note]], they did received a "Created By" credit for ''WesternAnimation/{{Jabberjaw}}'', and ''WesternAnimation/DynomuttDogWonder''[[note]]Which had CrossOver with Scooby-Doo.[[/note]]; they also co-created ''WesternAnimation/TheHoundcats'' and ''Bailey's Comets'' with and for [[Creator/DePatieFrelengEnterprises David [=DePatie=] and Friz Freleng]].) After CreativeDifferences with H-B, Ruby and Spears left the studio for ABC, supervising the network's Saturday morning programming slate before deciding to branch out on their own.

to:

Ruby-Spears is an animation house that was one of the more prolific animation studios of the late 1970s and throughout the 1980s. Studio founders Joe Ruby and Ken Spears started out as sound editors at Creator/HannaBarbera in the 1960s, eventually moving up the studio ladder into writing positions. This later led to the two creating the iconic ''Franchise/ScoobyDoo'' franchise for Hanna-Barbera, though they also played a part in many of Hanna-Barbera's successes before and after Scooby-Doo. While the pair did not have a "Created by" credit on ''Franchise/ScoobyDoo'' [[note]]Though they received writing credit in every episode's ending credits[[/note]], they did received a "Created By" credit for ''WesternAnimation/{{Jabberjaw}}'', and ''WesternAnimation/DynomuttDogWonder''[[note]]Which had CrossOver with Scooby-Doo.[[/note]]; they also co-created ''WesternAnimation/TheHoundcats'' and ''Bailey's Comets'' with and for [[Creator/DePatieFrelengEnterprises David [=DePatie=] and Friz Freleng]].) After CreativeDifferences with H-B, Ruby and Spears left the studio for ABC, in 1971, supervising the network's Saturday morning programming slate for both Creator/{{CBS}} and later Creator/{{ABC}} before deciding to branch out on their own.


Ruby-Spears is an animation house that was one of the more prolific animation studios of the late 1970s and throughout the 1980s. Studio founders Joe Ruby and Ken Spears started out as sound editors at Creator/HannaBarbera in the 1960s, eventually moving up the studio ladder into writing positions. This later led to the two creating the iconic ''Franchise/ScoobyDoo'' franchise for Hanna-Barbera, though they also played a part in many of Hanna-Barbera's successes before and after Scooby-Doo. While the pair did not have a "Created by" credit on ''Franchise/ScoobyDoo'' [[note]]Though they received writing credit in every episode's ending credits[[/note]], they did received a "Created By" credit for ''WesternAnimation/{{Jabberjaw}}'', and ''WesternAnimation/DynomuttDogWonder''[[note]]Which had CrossOver with Scooby-Doo.[[/note]]; they also co-created ''WesternAnimation/TheHoundcats'' and ''Bailey's Comets'' with and for [[Creator/DePatieFrelengEnterprises David [=DePatie=] and Friz Freleng]].)

to:

Ruby-Spears is an animation house that was one of the more prolific animation studios of the late 1970s and throughout the 1980s. Studio founders Joe Ruby and Ken Spears started out as sound editors at Creator/HannaBarbera in the 1960s, eventually moving up the studio ladder into writing positions. This later led to the two creating the iconic ''Franchise/ScoobyDoo'' franchise for Hanna-Barbera, though they also played a part in many of Hanna-Barbera's successes before and after Scooby-Doo. While the pair did not have a "Created by" credit on ''Franchise/ScoobyDoo'' [[note]]Though they received writing credit in every episode's ending credits[[/note]], they did received a "Created By" credit for ''WesternAnimation/{{Jabberjaw}}'', and ''WesternAnimation/DynomuttDogWonder''[[note]]Which had CrossOver with Scooby-Doo.[[/note]]; they also co-created ''WesternAnimation/TheHoundcats'' and ''Bailey's Comets'' with and for [[Creator/DePatieFrelengEnterprises David [=DePatie=] and Friz Freleng]].)
) After CreativeDifferences with H-B, Ruby and Spears left the studio for ABC, supervising the network's Saturday morning programming slate before deciding to branch out on their own.


Both Ruby and Spears continued to be involved in animation production in a limited capacity until the former died on August 26, 2020. Spears followed suit in passing almost three months later, on November 6.

to:

Both Ruby and Spears continued to be involved in animation television production in a limited capacity until the former died on August 26, 2020. Spears followed suit in passing almost three months later, on November 6.


Ruby died on August 26, 2020. Spears followed suit in passing almost three months later, on November 6.

to:

Both Ruby and Spears continued to be involved in animation production in a limited capacity until the former died on August 26, 2020. Spears followed suit in passing almost three months later, on November 6.

Added DiffLines:


Ruby died on August 26, 2020. Spears followed suit in passing almost three months later, on November 6.


* FriendlyEnemy: With Creator/HannaBarbera; when Ruby and Spears left the studio they did so to become competition and perhaps one up their former employers. However in the end they would continue their style, shared plenty of employees. Eventually once Taft owned both studios they became much friendlier and co-produced shows with them, and even put out composite character ads. You don't get much more friendly in competition than this.

to:

* FriendlyEnemy: With Creator/HannaBarbera; when Ruby and Spears left the studio they did so to become competition and perhaps one up their former employers. However in the end they would continue their style, and shared plenty of employees. Eventually Eventually, once Taft owned both studios studios, they became much friendlier and co-produced shows with them, and even put out composite character ads. You don't get much more friendly in competition than this.


The history of the studio is a turbulent one. After its' founding in 1977, Ruby and Spears launched their own venture to add more competition to their former employer Hanna-Barbera. Even from the offset, many employees were shared between both houses in addition to the stylistic similarities of their output. Aside from similar sound effects, the animation style mimicked Hanna-Barbera's tried and true LimitedAnimation methods. The visual similarities led to many of the early Ruby-Spears shows, such as ''WesternAnimation/{{Fangface}}'', often being mistaken for actual Hanna-Barbera shows. Initially owned by Creator/{{Filmways}} from 1977 to 1980, in 1981 they were purchased by Taft Broadcasting, who also owned Hanna-Barbera, making them sister companies. Hence, they were animation's best example of FriendlyEnemy in the industry. Further, they understood that the generation of their time would determine the next path of WesternAnimation and planned accordingly.

to:

The history of the studio is a turbulent one. After its' founding in 1977, Ruby and Spears launched their own venture to add more competition to their former employer Hanna-Barbera. Even from the offset, many employees were shared between both houses in addition to the stylistic similarities of their output. Aside from similar sound effects, the animation style mimicked Hanna-Barbera's tried and true LimitedAnimation methods. The visual similarities led to many of the early Ruby-Spears shows, such as ''WesternAnimation/{{Fangface}}'', often being mistaken for actual Hanna-Barbera shows. Initially owned by Creator/{{Filmways}} from 1977 to 1980, in 1981 they were purchased by Taft Broadcasting, who which also owned Hanna-Barbera, making them sister companies. Hence, they were animation's best example of FriendlyEnemy in the industry. Further, they understood that the generation of their time would determine the next path of WesternAnimation and planned accordingly.


The history of the studio is a turbulent one. After its' founding in 1977, Ruby and Spears launched their own venture to add more competition to their former employer Hanna-Barbera. Even from the offset, many employees were shared between both houses in addition to the stylistic similarities of their output. Aside from similar sound effects, the animation style mimicked Hanna-Barbera's tried and true LimitedAnimation methods. The visual similarities led to many of the early Ruby-Spears shows, such as ''WesternAnimation/{{Fangface}}'', often being mistaken for actual Hanna-Barbera shows. Initially owned by Creator/{{Filmways}} from 1977 to 1980, in 1981 they were purchased by Taft Broadcasting, who also owned Hanna-Barbera, making them sister companies. Hence, they were animation's best example of FriendlyEnemy in the industry. Further, they understood that the generation of their time would determine the next path of UsefulNotes/WesternAnimation and planned accordingly.

to:

The history of the studio is a turbulent one. After its' founding in 1977, Ruby and Spears launched their own venture to add more competition to their former employer Hanna-Barbera. Even from the offset, many employees were shared between both houses in addition to the stylistic similarities of their output. Aside from similar sound effects, the animation style mimicked Hanna-Barbera's tried and true LimitedAnimation methods. The visual similarities led to many of the early Ruby-Spears shows, such as ''WesternAnimation/{{Fangface}}'', often being mistaken for actual Hanna-Barbera shows. Initially owned by Creator/{{Filmways}} from 1977 to 1980, in 1981 they were purchased by Taft Broadcasting, who also owned Hanna-Barbera, making them sister companies. Hence, they were animation's best example of FriendlyEnemy in the industry. Further, they understood that the generation of their time would determine the next path of UsefulNotes/WesternAnimation WesternAnimation and planned accordingly.


The history of the studio is a turbulent one. After its' founding in 1977, Ruby and Spears launched their own venture to add more competition to their former employer Hanna-Barbera. Even from the offset, many employees were shared between both houses in addition to the stylistic similarities of their output. Aside from similar sound effects, the animation style mimicked Hanna-Barbera's tried and true LimitedAnimation methods. The visual similarities led to many of the early Ruby-Spears shows, such as ''WesternAnimation/{{Fangface}}'', often being mistaken for actual Hanna-Barbera shows. Initially owned by Creator/{{Filmways}} from 1977 to 1980, in 1981 they were purchased by Taft Broadcasting, who also owned Hanna-Barbera, making them sister companies. Hence, they were animation's best example of FriendlyEnemy in the industry.

to:

The history of the studio is a turbulent one. After its' founding in 1977, Ruby and Spears launched their own venture to add more competition to their former employer Hanna-Barbera. Even from the offset, many employees were shared between both houses in addition to the stylistic similarities of their output. Aside from similar sound effects, the animation style mimicked Hanna-Barbera's tried and true LimitedAnimation methods. The visual similarities led to many of the early Ruby-Spears shows, such as ''WesternAnimation/{{Fangface}}'', often being mistaken for actual Hanna-Barbera shows. Initially owned by Creator/{{Filmways}} from 1977 to 1980, in 1981 they were purchased by Taft Broadcasting, who also owned Hanna-Barbera, making them sister companies. Hence, they were animation's best example of FriendlyEnemy in the industry.
industry. Further, they understood that the generation of their time would determine the next path of UsefulNotes/WesternAnimation and planned accordingly.

Showing 15 edit(s) of 103

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report