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* NoExportForYou: In terms of Hanna-Barbera's old-school cartoon distribution, this trope targets Germany and Austria. Hanna-Barbera did not recognize Germany (until 1990, split into West Germany and East Germany) and Austria because of both countries' very harsh history of authoritarianism and is also due to MoralGuardians. Until the 1990s, West Germany (later Germany) and Austria heavily relied on American animation studios other than Hanna-Barbera for American animation distribution. As a result, most classic Hanna-Barbera cartoons were never dubbed into German while some others, like ''WesternAnimation/YogiBear'' and ''WesternAnimation/TopCat'', fall into LateExportForYou as they were only released in Germany and Austria in the 1990s.

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* NoExportForYou: In terms of Hanna-Barbera's old-school cartoon distribution, For Hanna-Barbera, this trope targets was the case in Germany and Austria.Austria, when the AnimationAgeGhetto was strong in the United States. Hanna-Barbera did not recognize Germany (until 1990, split into West Germany and East Germany) and Austria because of both countries' very harsh history of authoritarianism and is also due to MoralGuardians. Until the 1990s, West Germany (later Germany) and Austria heavily relied on American animation studios other than Hanna-Barbera for American animation distribution. As a result, most classic Hanna-Barbera cartoons were never dubbed into in German while some others, like ''WesternAnimation/YogiBear'' and ''WesternAnimation/TopCat'', fall into LateExportForYou as they were only released in Germany and Austria in the 1990s.


** As a longtime ''WesternAnimation/ScoobyDoo'' and HB fan, not only did Van Partible had the honor of writing a crossover episode with the Mystery, Inc. gang for ''WesternAnimation/JohnnyBravo'' and later story boarding for [[WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooMysteryIncorporated one of their many televised reboots]], but he also had the chance to work with studio co-founder Joe Barbera himself during ''Johnny'''s first season.

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** As a longtime ''WesternAnimation/ScoobyDoo'' and HB fan, not only did Van Partible had the honor of writing a crossover episode with the Mystery, Inc. gang for ''WesternAnimation/JohnnyBravo'' and later story boarding for [[WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooMysteryIncorporated one of their many televised reboots]], but he also had the chance to work with studio co-founder Joe Barbera himself himself, having him as a writer and consultant during the first few episodes of ''Johnny'''s first season.season, before he was dismissed due to budget constraints.
*** Van also wanted the aesthetic '50s HB design style implanted in the show and as such tried to hire as much veterans from the studio as he could, with one specific alumni he got out of retirement, Ed Benedict, who was a background consultant and background designer for the first season and several holiday specials.


** ''[[WesternAnimation/MobyDickHannaBarbera Moby Dick]]''
%%* ''WesternAnimation/{{Monchhichis}}''

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** ''[[WesternAnimation/MobyDickHannaBarbera Moby Dick]]''
%%* ''WesternAnimation/{{Monchhichis}}''
''WesternAnimation/{{Moby Dick|HannaBarbera}}''
* ''Monchhichis''


** Shows which used exaggerated cartoony designs for their human characters (e.g., WesternAnimation/TheFlintstones, WesternAnimation/TheJetsons) also used four-fingered hands, while shows which used realistically-designed human characters (e.g., WesternAnimation/JonnyQuest, WesternAnimation/ScoobyDoo, most HB superhero characters such as WesternAnimation/{{Birdman|1967}} and WesternAnimation/SpaceGhost, and any animated spin-off based on a live-action TV or film) used five-fingered hands.

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** Shows which used exaggerated cartoony designs for their human characters (e.g., WesternAnimation/TheFlintstones, WesternAnimation/TheJetsons) also used four-fingered hands, while shows which used realistically-designed human characters (e.g., WesternAnimation/JonnyQuest, WesternAnimation/ScoobyDoo, most HB superhero characters such as WesternAnimation/{{Birdman|1967}} and WesternAnimation/SpaceGhost, and any animated spin-off based on a live-action TV show or film) used five-fingered hands.


** Shows which used exaggerated cartoony designs for their human characters (e.g. WesternAnimation/TheFlintstones, WesternAnimation/TheJetsons) also used four-fingered hands, while shows which used realistically-designed human characters (e.g. WesternAnimation/JonnyQuest, WesternAnimation/ScoobyDoo, most HB superhero characters such as WesternAnimation/{{Birdman|1967}} and WesternAnimation/SpaceGhost, and any LiveAction animated spinoff) used five-fingered hands.
** Some shows had characters with both four-fingered and five-fingered hands, particularly those that had both anthromorphic/cartoony characters paired with more realistically-designed human characters (e.g. WesternAnimation/CaptainCavemanAndTheTeenAngels, WesternAnimation/LaffALympics).

to:

** Shows which used exaggerated cartoony designs for their human characters (e.g. , WesternAnimation/TheFlintstones, WesternAnimation/TheJetsons) also used four-fingered hands, while shows which used realistically-designed human characters (e.g. , WesternAnimation/JonnyQuest, WesternAnimation/ScoobyDoo, most HB superhero characters such as WesternAnimation/{{Birdman|1967}} and WesternAnimation/SpaceGhost, and any LiveAction animated spinoff) spin-off based on a live-action TV or film) used five-fingered hands.
** Some shows had characters with both four-fingered and five-fingered hands, particularly those that had both anthromorphic/cartoony characters paired with more realistically-designed human characters (e.g. , WesternAnimation/CaptainCavemanAndTheTeenAngels, WesternAnimation/LaffALympics).



* FriendlyEnemy: With Creator/RubySpears, both Ruby and Spears met at Hanna Barbera and split off to form their own studio. Despite doing so to create more competition for them they however shared a generally positive relationship with their old employer. (Given that they shared multiple employees this of course made some sense) Once Ruby-Spears was sold to Taft in 1981, H-B and R-S became sister studios and began producing shows together and co-marketing. The relationship is somewhat fuzzier now since the Ruby-Spears library was merged into the Hanna-Barbera library.

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* FriendlyEnemy: FriendlyEnemy:
**
With Creator/RubySpears, both Ruby and Spears met at Hanna Barbera and split off to form their own studio. Despite doing so to create more competition for them they however shared a generally positive relationship with their old employer. (Given that they shared multiple employees this of course made some sense) Once Ruby-Spears was sold to Taft in 1981, H-B and R-S became sister studios and began producing shows together and co-marketing. The relationship is somewhat fuzzier now since the Ruby-Spears library was merged into the Hanna-Barbera library.


** Shows which used exaggerated cartoony designs for their human characters (e.g. WesternAnimation/TheFlintstones, WesternAnimation/TheJetsons) also used four-fingered hands, while shows which used realistically-designed human characters (e.g. WesternAnimation/JonnyQuest, WesternAnimation/ScoobyDoo, most HB superhero characters such as WesternAnimation/{{Birdman|1967}} and WesternAnimation/SpaceGhost) used five-fingered hands.

to:

** Shows which used exaggerated cartoony designs for their human characters (e.g. WesternAnimation/TheFlintstones, WesternAnimation/TheJetsons) also used four-fingered hands, while shows which used realistically-designed human characters (e.g. WesternAnimation/JonnyQuest, WesternAnimation/ScoobyDoo, most HB superhero characters such as WesternAnimation/{{Birdman|1967}} and WesternAnimation/SpaceGhost) WesternAnimation/SpaceGhost, and any LiveAction animated spinoff) used five-fingered hands.


* FourFingeredHands: Played with. Shows which used exaggerated cartoony designs for their human characters (e.g. WesternAnimation/TheFlintstones, WesternAnimation/TheJetsons) used four-fingered hands, while shows which used realistically-designed human characters (e.g. WesternAnimation/JonnyQuest, WesternAnimation/ScoobyDoo) used five-fingered hands. Some shows had characters with both four-fingered and five-fingered hands, particularly those that had both cartoony characters paired with more realistically-designed human characters (e.g. WesternAnimation/DynomuttDogWonder, WesternAnimation/CaptainCavemanAndTheTeenAngels).

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* FourFingeredHands: Played with. Shows which used exaggerated cartoony designs for their human characters with.
** Any anthropomorphic FunnyAnimal character
(e.g. WesternAnimation/TheFlintstones, WesternAnimation/TheJetsons) used four-fingered hands, while shows , WesternAnimation/YogiBear, WesternAnimation/HuckleberryHound, WesternAnimation/{{Snagglepuss}}) almost always has four fingers.
** Shows
which used realistically-designed exaggerated cartoony designs for their human characters (e.g. WesternAnimation/JonnyQuest, WesternAnimation/ScoobyDoo) WesternAnimation/TheFlintstones, WesternAnimation/TheJetsons) also used five-fingered hands. Some shows had characters with both four-fingered and five-fingered hands, particularly those that had both cartoony characters paired with more while shows which used realistically-designed human characters (e.g. WesternAnimation/DynomuttDogWonder, WesternAnimation/CaptainCavemanAndTheTeenAngels).WesternAnimation/JonnyQuest, WesternAnimation/ScoobyDoo, most HB superhero characters such as WesternAnimation/{{Birdman|1967}} and WesternAnimation/SpaceGhost) used five-fingered hands.
** Some shows had characters with both four-fingered and five-fingered hands, particularly those that had both anthromorphic/cartoony characters paired with more realistically-designed human characters (e.g. WesternAnimation/CaptainCavemanAndTheTeenAngels, WesternAnimation/LaffALympics).


Hanna-Barbera pioneered the use of many LimitedAnimation techniques, such as RingAroundTheCollar, to produce cartoons on a low budget quickly enough to meet a television schedule. As a result a lot of Hanna-Barbera shows put the emphasis more on the voice acting and the writing/gags than the actual animation process itself. Other animators who have enjoyed better budgets in different circumstances like the ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes''-famed Creator/ChuckJones would dismiss this approach as "Illustrated Radio." These practices allowed them to continue producing works and employing in times where other studios struggled and managed to continue doing so well into the 1980s and 1990s. In 1967, the company was purchased by Ohio-based Taft Broadcasting (yes, related to [[UsefulNotes/WilliamHowardTaft that Taft]]), which also owned a bunch of regional theme parks such as King's Island in Ohio and Carowinds in North Carolina, and thus Hanna-Barbera properties became prominent at these parks, lasting for years after Taft spun them off (eventually coming under Creator/{{Paramount}} ownership, then Creator/CedarFair; the attractions were rebranded as Creator/{{Nickelodeon}}-themed rides, and then after ''ComicStrip/{{Peanuts}}'' in later years); after Taft acquired syndication company Worldvision Enterprises (the former Creator/{{ABC}} Films) in the late 1970s, this meant that not only did H-B have easier access to the syndication market, but Taft's television stations also had a built-in cartoon supply.

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Hanna-Barbera pioneered the use of many LimitedAnimation techniques, such as RingAroundTheCollar, to produce cartoons on a low budget quickly enough to meet a television schedule. As a result a lot of Hanna-Barbera shows put the emphasis more on the voice acting and the writing/gags than the actual animation process itself. Other Although other animators who have enjoyed better budgets in different circumstances like the ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes''-famed Creator/ChuckJones circumstances, such as famed ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes'' veteran Creator/ChuckJones, would dismiss this approach as "Illustrated Radio." These Radio", these practices allowed them H-B to continue producing works and employing in times where other studios struggled struggled, and managed manage to continue doing so well into the 1980s and 1990s. In 1967, the company was purchased by Ohio-based Taft Broadcasting (yes, related to [[UsefulNotes/WilliamHowardTaft that Taft]]), which also owned a bunch of regional theme parks such as King's Island in Ohio and Carowinds in North Carolina, and thus Hanna-Barbera properties became prominent at these parks, lasting for years after Taft spun them off (eventually coming under Creator/{{Paramount}} ownership, then Creator/CedarFair; the attractions were rebranded as Creator/{{Nickelodeon}}-themed rides, and then after ''ComicStrip/{{Peanuts}}'' in later years); after years), and when Taft acquired syndication company Worldvision Enterprises (the former Creator/{{ABC}} Films) in the late 1970s, this meant that not only did H-B have easier access to the syndication market, but Taft's Taft television stations also had a built-in cartoon supply.


[[caption-width-right:350:Joseph Barbera (left) and William Hanna (right) with plushes of some of their many characters and a couple of the Emmys their studio won over the years.[[note]] On Barbera and Hanna's knees, respectively: [[WesternAnimation/TheFlintstones Fred Flintstone and Dino the dinosaur]]. Middle, back row, L-R: WesternAnimation/WallyGator, WesternAnimation/YogiBear, WesternAnimation/QuickDrawMcGraw; front row, L-R: [[WesternAnimation/TheHuckleberryHoundShow Huckleberry Hound]], WesternAnimation/TomAndJerry, WesternAnimation/TopCat.[[/note]]]]

The partnership of William Denby "Bill" Hanna (July 14, 1910 March 22, 2001) and Joseph Roland "Joe" Barbera (March 24, 1911 December 18, 2006) (yes, it was ''not,'' in fact, created by a woman named Hanna Barbera) began at [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation MGM's animation studio]], where the pair created WesternAnimation/TomAndJerry and spent almost 20 years directing their cartoon shorts. After MGM got out of the cartoon business in 1957, Hanna and Barbera founded their own studio, which came to dominate WesternAnimation on television for decades.

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[[caption-width-right:350:Joseph Barbera (left) and William Hanna (right) with plushes of some of their many characters and a couple of the Emmys UsefulNotes/{{Emmy Award}}s their studio won over the years.[[note]] On Barbera and Hanna's knees, respectively: [[WesternAnimation/TheFlintstones Fred Flintstone and Dino the dinosaur]]. Middle, back row, L-R: WesternAnimation/WallyGator, WesternAnimation/YogiBear, WesternAnimation/QuickDrawMcGraw; front row, L-R: [[WesternAnimation/TheHuckleberryHoundShow Huckleberry Hound]], WesternAnimation/TomAndJerry, WesternAnimation/TopCat.[[/note]]]]

The partnership of William Denby "Bill" Hanna (July 14, 1910 March 22, 2001) and Joseph Roland "Joe" Barbera (March 24, 1911 December 18, 2006) (yes, 2006)--yes, it was ''not,'' in fact, created by a woman named Hanna Barbera) began Barbera--began at [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation MGM's animation studio]], where the pair created WesternAnimation/TomAndJerry and spent almost 20 years directing their cartoon shorts. After MGM got out of the cartoon business in 1957, Hanna and Barbera founded their own studio, which came would come to dominate WesternAnimation on television for decades.


* NoExportForYou: In terms of Hanna-Barbera's old-school cartoon distribution, this trope targets Germany and Austria. Hanna-Barbera did not recognize Germany (until 1990, split into West Germany and East Germany) and Austria because of both countries' very harsh history of authoritarianism and is also due to MoralGuardians. Until the 1990s, West Germany (later Germany) and Austria heavily relied on American animation studios other than Hanna-Barbera for American animation distribution. As a result, most classic Hanna-Barbera cartoons were never been dubbed into German while some others, like ''WesternAnimation/YogiBear'' and ''WesternAnimation/TopCat'', fall into LateExportForYou as they were only released in Germany and Austria in the 1990s.

to:

* NoExportForYou: In terms of Hanna-Barbera's old-school cartoon distribution, this trope targets Germany and Austria. Hanna-Barbera did not recognize Germany (until 1990, split into West Germany and East Germany) and Austria because of both countries' very harsh history of authoritarianism and is also due to MoralGuardians. Until the 1990s, West Germany (later Germany) and Austria heavily relied on American animation studios other than Hanna-Barbera for American animation distribution. As a result, most classic Hanna-Barbera cartoons were never been dubbed into German while some others, like ''WesternAnimation/YogiBear'' and ''WesternAnimation/TopCat'', fall into LateExportForYou as they were only released in Germany and Austria in the 1990s.


* ''WesternAnimation/{{Monchhichis}}''

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* %%* ''WesternAnimation/{{Monchhichis}}''

Added DiffLines:

* NoExportForYou: In terms of Hanna-Barbera's old-school cartoon distribution, this trope targets Germany and Austria. Hanna-Barbera did not recognize Germany (until 1990, split into West Germany and East Germany) and Austria because of both countries' very harsh history of authoritarianism and is also due to MoralGuardians. Until the 1990s, West Germany (later Germany) and Austria heavily relied on American animation studios other than Hanna-Barbera for American animation distribution. As a result, most classic Hanna-Barbera cartoons were never been dubbed into German while some others, like ''WesternAnimation/YogiBear'' and ''WesternAnimation/TopCat'', fall into LateExportForYou as they were only released in Germany and Austria in the 1990s.


** The studio's sister company, Creator/RubySpears, has received some of this by way of how the Turner buyout merged their library into the Hanna Barbera library. Some of their cartoons are branded in the Hanna-Barbera Classic Collection, some are not. However all claim Hanna Barbera as their owner in the legal crawl on the back, because legally now they are. [[note]]The reason behind this was because the Ruby Spears' pre-1991 back catalog was purchased by Turner Entertainment along with HB, but not the studio itself. This is why their final cartoons, like ''WesternAnimation/MegaMan'', don't appear with the rest of their library on DVD, as they were produced after the buyout when RB was operating independently.[[/note]]

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** The studio's sister company, Creator/RubySpears, has received some of this by way of how the Turner buyout merged their library into the Hanna Barbera library. Some of their cartoons are branded in the Hanna-Barbera Classic Collection, some are not. However all claim Hanna Barbera as their owner in the legal crawl on the back, because legally now they are. [[note]]The reason behind this was because the Ruby Spears' pre-1991 back catalog was purchased by Turner Entertainment along with HB, but not the studio itself. This is why their final cartoons, like ''WesternAnimation/MegaMan'', ''WesternAnimation/MegaManRubySpears'', don't appear with the rest of their library on DVD, as they were produced after the buyout when RB was operating independently.[[/note]]


In 1996, Time Warner merged with Turner Broadcasting, putting them under the same corporate roof as Creator/WarnerBros. This reunited a few H-B shows that had been in the hands of Warner Bros.[[note]]Namely the AnimatedAdaptation versions of ''Series/{{The Dukes of Hazzard}}'', ''[[Creator/AbbottAndCostello The Abbott and Costello Show]]'' and Ruby-Spears' WesternAnimation/PoliceAcademyTheAnimatedSeries[[/note]], and reunited the pre-1948 ''Looney Tunes'' with the rest of the library.[[note]]The Warner Bros. library (and the rest of Warner Bros. Television, for that matter) is still separate from the Turner and H-B libraries, but can be co-marketed when they wish.[[/note]] From this point Hanna-Barbera was slowly merged into Warner Bros. Animation, with the intent that the new company didn't need more than one animation studio. This, however, didn't go entirely smoothly. [[note]]The short version is that basically there were way too many people with different goals trying to be shoved under one roof. You had very pro WB people who didn't want to be associated with HB in any way. You had HB people that felt the new generation disrespected the HB legacy. You had younger employees not wanting to be shackled to the WB or HB legacies. You had WB execs who had helped with Nickelodeon not wanting to work with CN. And you had a lot of people stuck in the middle wanting the whole thing to just end already.[[/note]] Just before the then-imminent death of Bill Hanna in 2001, Cartoon Network programming and the units producing them were spun out into their own entity (Cartoon Network Studios) under the Turner silo and Warner Bros. assumed the production of ''WesternAnimation/ScoobyDoo'', the company's [[LongRunners longest-running franchise]] and picked up all their legacy properties with Hanna-Barbera credited as the copyright holder under the Warner Bros. silo. By this point in time, the Cartoon Cartoon efforts had dominated the studio's output, in comparison to other general Hanna Barbera productions, and from here on out the earliest Cartoon Cartoons (including ''WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls1998'')[[note]]the final series to use the company's trademark "swirling star" logo (and even then, it was originally done as a throwback, as it was last used in 1992, outside an odd ''WesternAnimation/JohnnyBravo'' episode in 1997, apparently an editing error)[[/note]] stopped being associated with Hanna-Barbera as well.

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In 1996, Time Warner merged with Turner Broadcasting, putting them under the same corporate roof as Creator/WarnerBros. This reunited a few H-B shows that had been in the hands of Warner Bros.[[note]]Namely the AnimatedAdaptation versions of ''Series/{{The Dukes of Hazzard}}'', ''[[Creator/AbbottAndCostello The Abbott and Costello Show]]'' and Ruby-Spears' WesternAnimation/PoliceAcademyTheAnimatedSeries[[/note]], and reunited the pre-1948 ''Looney Tunes'' with the rest of the library.[[note]]The Warner Bros. library (and the rest of Warner Bros. Television, for that matter) is still separate from the Turner and H-B libraries, but can be co-marketed when they wish.[[/note]] From this point Hanna-Barbera was slowly merged into Warner Bros. Animation, with the intent that the new company didn't need more than one animation studio. This, however, didn't go entirely smoothly. [[note]]The short version is that basically there were way too many people with different goals trying to be shoved under one roof. You had very pro WB people who didn't want to be associated with HB in any way. You had HB people that felt the new generation disrespected the HB legacy. You had younger employees not wanting to be shackled to the WB or HB legacies. You had WB execs who had helped with Nickelodeon not wanting to work with CN. And you had a lot of people stuck in the middle wanting the whole thing to just end already.[[/note]] Just before the then-imminent death of Bill Hanna in 2001, Cartoon Network programming and the units producing them were spun out into their own entity (Cartoon Network Studios) under the Turner silo and Warner Bros. assumed the production of ''WesternAnimation/ScoobyDoo'', the company's [[LongRunners longest-running franchise]] and picked up all their legacy properties with Hanna-Barbera credited as the copyright holder under the Warner Bros. silo. By this point in time, the Cartoon Cartoon efforts had dominated the studio's output, in comparison to other general Hanna Barbera productions, and from here on out the earliest Cartoon Cartoons (including ''WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls1998'')[[note]]the ''WesternAnimation/{{The Powerpuff Girls|1998}}'')[[note]]the final series to use the company's trademark "swirling star" logo (and even then, it was originally done as a throwback, as it was last used in 1992, outside an odd ''WesternAnimation/JohnnyBravo'' episode in 1997, apparently an editing error)[[/note]] stopped being associated with Hanna-Barbera as well.


In the late 1980s, Taft (which later renamed itself to Great American Broadcasting) faced a lot of internal and financial issues (chiefly stemming from a hostile takeover led by junk bond trader [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Lindner_Jr. Carl Lindner]]). This had a major impact on the fates of Hanna-Barbera and its siblings. As a way of cutting costs, they began to look to sell off the studios. The first sale happened in 1988, when a buyout was reached for Hanna-Barbera's Australian division. That entity became the Southern Star Group and took the rights of the shows and specials produced by that sub-entity. The problems however still continued, as this lead to an exodus of 80s Hanna-Barbera staff to go help revitalize the Creator/WarnerBros Animation studio. In the early 1990s, GAB decided to put Hanna-Barbera and sister studio Ruby-Spears up for sale as well.

to:

In the late 1980s, Taft (which later renamed itself to Great American Broadcasting) faced a lot of internal and financial issues (chiefly stemming from a hostile takeover led by junk bond trader [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Lindner_Jr. Carl Lindner]]).Lindner). This had a major impact on the fates of Hanna-Barbera and its siblings. As a way of cutting costs, they began to look to sell off the studios. The first sale happened in 1988, when a buyout was reached for Hanna-Barbera's Australian division. That entity became the Southern Star Group and took the rights of the shows and specials produced by that sub-entity. The problems however still continued, as this lead to an exodus of 80s Hanna-Barbera staff to go help revitalize the Creator/WarnerBros Animation studio. In the early 1990s, GAB decided to put Hanna-Barbera and sister studio Ruby-Spears up for sale as well.

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