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* {{Mortasheen}}'s most notable inflictor of this is [[http://www.bogleech.com/mortasheen/willoweird.htm Willoweird]], a nasty walking tree that hypnotizes you into eating one of its fruits. When then converts you into a tree, that the Willoweird then parasitically feeds upon. Did we mention that you can survive for ''decades'' in this state?


** The supplement Book of Vile Darkness has the spell Eternity of Torture.(Like most Vile Magic, only wizards who had already fallen past the MoralEventHorizon would consider using it.)

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** The supplement Book of Vile Darkness has the spell Eternity of Torture.(Like Torture, which is ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin. Like most Vile Magic, only wizards who had have already fallen past the MoralEventHorizon would consider using it.)


* The [[GoneHorriblyWrong Experiments Gone Horribly Wrong]] of ''TabletopGame/BleakWorld'' are defined by multiple different personalities that cannot directly control the body, but can talk to the prime consciousness. However, various perks allow experiments to silence, but not outright destroy, these personalities. Essentially this traps them in a state where they can see and experience everything they do, but never even affect the decision.

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* The [[GoneHorriblyWrong Experiments Gone Horribly Wrong]] of ''TabletopGame/BleakWorld'' are defined by multiple different personalities that cannot directly control the body, but can talk to the prime consciousness. However, various perks allow experiments to silence, but not outright destroy, these personalities. Essentially this traps them in a state where they can see and experience everything they do, but never even affect the decision.decision.
* ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'''s exile mechanic tend to use this trope (or otherwise a FateWorseThanDeath) or CessationOfExistence to remove a creature from the game, such as the case with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=368514 Unmake]]
** On Kamigawa, the corrupt emperor [[LightIsNotGood Konda]] attained immortality, and was promptly imprisoned indefinitely as punishment.
** Daxos of Meletis was killed by a BrainwashedAndCrazy Elspeth, who later strikes a deal with the god of the Theros Underworld Erebos, trading her soul for Daxos to return to life [[spoiler:before she is killed by Heliod]]. Unfortunately, Erebos cheats her out of this deal by bringing Daxos back to life as a [[OurZombiesAreDifferent Returned]], eternally bound to seek out Elsepth [[spoiler:even though she is dead]].


** A spinoff short story ''Into the Maelstrom'' has a traitor SpaceMarine imprisoned in a Dreadnaught battle suit, normally an honor, but never released, so he is doomed to live forever in a small metal box, with no limbs. This is in fact the fate of ''all'' Space Marines encased in Dreadnaught armour, with the occasional mindless rampage, but it isn't always this trope (and is a good example of how a different attitude can affect the outcome). Regular Space Marines, both those encased and their brethren, consider it an honour as they can fight the Emperor's enemies even after death, albeit with slowly degrading mental faculties. Chaos Marines however, being {{Sense Freak}}s taken to the literal utter screaming extreme, consider it to be the worst punishment imaginable, as even while battling they can't feel [[AxeCrazy the joy of slaughter]] and while inactive their brethren have to ''chain them to a wall'' to prevent the completely bugfuck insane Marine (even by Chaos standards) from breaking loose and killing everyone.

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** A spinoff short story ''Into the Maelstrom'' has a traitor SpaceMarine imprisoned in a Dreadnaught battle suit, normally an honor, but never released, so he is doomed to live forever in a small metal box, with no limbs. This is in fact the fate of ''all'' Space Marines encased in Dreadnaught armour, with the occasional mindless rampage, but it isn't always this trope (and is a good example of how a different attitude can affect the outcome). Regular Space Marines, both those encased and their brethren, consider it an honour as they can fight the Emperor's enemies even after death, albeit with slowly degrading mental faculties. Chaos Marines however, being {{Sense Freak}}s taken to the literal utter screaming extreme, consider it to be the worst punishment imaginable, as even while battling they can't feel [[AxeCrazy the joy of slaughter]] and while inactive their brethren have to ''chain them to a wall'' to prevent the completely bugfuck insane Marine (even by Chaos standards) from breaking loose and killing everyone. Note that in all cases, the occupant of a Dreadnought ''can'' scream, it's just that in the case of Chaos Dreadnoughts, there's no one around that cares.


** One sourcebook mentions that the nightmares tend to involve what put you into torpor in the first place, with kindred starving to torpor stuck in an eternal loop where they hunt a human and never reach them. Go into torpor through violence, or being staked, and God help you-- because you're going to relive that losing battle until someone finds it in their dead heart to revive you. That is, if they don't decide to chow down on you instead, in which case, you'll simply scream inside your immobile body and watch as your saviour devours everything that made you who you are and all your memories, before you crumble into a pile of ash. And that ''still'' doesn't end your torment, because it is rather heavily implied that you survive within your devourer's body for the rest of eternity.

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** One sourcebook mentions that the nightmares tend to involve what put you into torpor in the first place, with kindred Kindred starving to torpor stuck in an eternal loop where they hunt a human and never reach them. Go into torpor through violence, or being staked, and God help you-- because you're going to relive that losing battle until someone finds it in their dead heart to revive you. That is, if they don't decide to chow down on you instead, in which case, you'll simply scream inside your immobile body and watch as your saviour devours everything that made you who you are and all your memories, before you crumble into a pile of ash. And that ''still'' doesn't end your torment, because it is rather heavily implied that you survive within your devourer's body for the rest of eternity.



** The second Monster Manual in the 4th Edition describes a specific case, the fate of the Primordial Storralk, who challenged Demogorgon for the title of Prince of Demons and came very close to winning. Demogorgon spared him, but ripped his body to pieces, and used the still-living pieces to construct his throne room. Storralk still lives in this state, and the two-headed giants called ettins were originally spawned from his body, including the Demogorgon's powerful[[TheDragon Exarch]] Trarak. (Legend says that Storralk can be released from his imprisonment if Tharak is slain and her heart burned upon Demogorgon's throne; the freed Primordial could prove a valuable ally for anyone who would challenge the Prince of Demons.)
** The Splat book ''Faces of Evil: The Fiends'' mentions the Tower of Incarnate Pain, under construction by the yugoloths on Carceri. It is made of both dead souls and any mortal beings who come to close to it; they are absorbed by the Tower and turned into bricks. Fortunately, all victims have been allowed to die eventually, because the yugoloths can't seem to keep the thing up. Three times, the geheleths have attacked the Tower and torn it into pieces, the absorbed victims screaming in the process.
** It's hard to feel sorry for an [[EldrichAbomination aboleth]], but as aquatic creatures, they can't breath air for very long, and they do ''not'' "drown" if they are separated from the water too long. Instead, they enter a state called "Long Dreaming" which they consider far worse than death; a thick membrane forms around it, and it enters a state of suspended animation where it experiences hideous nightmares. (Of course, an aboleth in such a state is a sitting duck if an enemy - which is most other races - finds it, so it's usually killed soon anyway.)

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** The second Monster Manual in the 4th Edition describes a specific case, the fate of the Primordial Storralk, who challenged Demogorgon for the title of Prince of Demons and came very close to winning. Demogorgon spared him, but ripped his body to pieces, and used the still-living pieces to construct his throne room. Storralk still lives in this state, and the two-headed giants called ettins were originally spawned from his body, including the Demogorgon's powerful[[TheDragon powerful [[TheDragon Exarch]] Trarak. (Legend says that Storralk can be released from his imprisonment if Tharak is slain and her heart burned upon Demogorgon's throne; the freed Primordial could prove a valuable ally for anyone who would challenge the Prince of Demons.)
** The Splat book splatbook ''Faces of Evil: The Fiends'' mentions the Tower of Incarnate Pain, under construction by the yugoloths on Carceri. It is made of both dead souls and any mortal beings who come to too close to it; they are absorbed by the Tower and turned into bricks. Fortunately, all victims have been allowed to die eventually, because the yugoloths can't seem to keep the thing up. Three times, the geheleths have attacked the Tower and torn it into pieces, the absorbed victims screaming in the process.
** It's hard to feel sorry for an [[EldrichAbomination [[EldritchAbomination aboleth]], but as aquatic creatures, they can't breath breathe air for very long, and they do ''not'' "drown" if they are separated from the water too long. Instead, they enter a state called "Long Dreaming" which they consider far worse than death; a thick membrane forms around it, the aboleth, and it enters a state of suspended animation where it experiences hideous nightmares. (Of course, an aboleth in such a state is a sitting duck if an enemy - which is most other races - finds it, so it's usually killed soon anyway.)



* One ''Dungeons & Dragons'' monster race, the Aboleth, are immortal abominations of the sea. Should they dehydrate, they don't die, but instead turn into an immobile shell, still aware but incapable of any sort of action. This is described in the Lords of Madness supplement as a FateWorseThanDeath.



* The [[GoneHorriblyWrong Experiments Gone Horribly Wrong]] of ''TabletopGame/BleakWorld'' are defined by multiple different personalities that cannot directly control the body, but can talk to the prime consciousness. However, various perks allow experiments to silence, but not outright destroy, these personalities. Essentially this traps them in a state where they can see and experience everything they do, but never even effect the decision.

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* The [[GoneHorriblyWrong Experiments Gone Horribly Wrong]] of ''TabletopGame/BleakWorld'' are defined by multiple different personalities that cannot directly control the body, but can talk to the prime consciousness. However, various perks allow experiments to silence, but not outright destroy, these personalities. Essentially this traps them in a state where they can see and experience everything they do, but never even effect affect the decision.


* While the Immortality gift from ''TabletopGame/{{Nobilis}}'' explicitly protects you from attempts to pull this, this doesn't stop it being played straight in some of the border fictions.

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* While the Immortality gift from ''TabletopGame/{{Nobilis}}'' explicitly protects you from attempts to pull this, this doesn't stop it being played straight in some of the border fictions.fictions.
* The [[GoneHorriblyWrong Experiments Gone Horribly Wrong]] of ''TabletopGame/BleakWorld'' are defined by multiple different personalities that cannot directly control the body, but can talk to the prime consciousness. However, various perks allow experiments to silence, but not outright destroy, these personalities. Essentially this traps them in a state where they can see and experience everything they do, but never even effect the decision.


* ''Dungeons & Dragons''' ''{{Ravenloft}}'' setting has a monster known as the Wall of Flesh. It's created when the rage and fear of a person who has been imprisoned within a wall mixes with Ravenloft's special flavor of magic.

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* The ''Dungeons & Dragons''' ''{{Ravenloft}}'' setting ''TabletopGame/{{Ravenloft}}'' has a monster known as the Wall of Flesh. It's created when the rage and fear of a person who has been imprisoned within a wall mixes with Ravenloft's ''Ravenloft's'' special flavor of magic.



* The Transmogrification spell from ''{{GURPS}}: Magic'' keeps the target's mind intact and active but makes them in to an inanimate object for a while. The Entombment spell traps the target in a tiny bubble deep beneath the earth for eternity unless it is somehow undone.

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* The Transmogrification spell from ''{{GURPS}}: ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}: Magic'' keeps the target's mind intact and active but makes them in to an inanimate object for a while. The Entombment spell traps the target in a tiny bubble deep beneath the earth for eternity unless it is somehow undone.



* Ravi, a planeswalker in the [[MagicTheGathering world of Ulgrotha]], was desperate to end a huge war. She did so by ringing the Apocalypse Chime, which wiped out the whole battlefield of its warring parties, and put herself in a magic coffin designed by her mentor to avoid the destruction. Unfortunately, she didn't ascertain how to get OUT. [[spoiler:She was eventually found by Baron Sengir, becoming the "delightfully" mad Grandmother Sengir.]]

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* Ravi, a planeswalker in the [[MagicTheGathering [[TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering world of Ulgrotha]], was desperate to end a huge war. She did so by ringing the Apocalypse Chime, which wiped out the whole battlefield of its warring parties, and put herself in a magic coffin designed by her mentor to avoid the destruction. Unfortunately, she didn't ascertain how to get OUT. [[spoiler:She was eventually found by Baron Sengir, becoming the "delightfully" mad Grandmother Sengir.]]



* In ''MonstersAndOtherChildishThings'', the empty skin of a person an Excruciator has hollowed out into a LivingBodysuit is explicitly mentioned to be still live and conscious. No, the game doesn't even ''hint'' that there's any way to restore a person from this.

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* In ''MonstersAndOtherChildishThings'', ''TabletopGame/MonstersAndOtherChildishThings'', the empty skin of a person an Excruciator has hollowed out into a LivingBodysuit is explicitly mentioned to be still live and conscious. No, the game doesn't even ''hint'' that there's any way to restore a person from this.

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** There is also the relatively mundane and often contested example from the First Age, where a Solar made an instrument that works by torturing various mortals, their screams made supernaturally beautiful, and the mortals are not allowed to die.


** ''Fulgrim'' has an impressive one of these, [[spoiler:as the primarch Fulgrim is eventually completely possessed by the demon joyriding in him, who keeps him fully aware of its actions in his body, which is mutated by the demon into something more pleasing to it. While his soul was trapped inside a portrait.]] As this occurred during the HorusHeresy, the fate is up to 10,000 years and running.

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** ''Fulgrim'' has an impressive one of these, [[spoiler:as the primarch Fulgrim is eventually completely possessed by the demon joyriding in him, who keeps him fully aware of its actions in his body, which is mutated by the demon into something more pleasing to it. While his soul was trapped inside a portrait.]] As this occurred during the HorusHeresy, Literature/HorusHeresy, the fate is up to 10,000 years and running.


* ''DungeonsAndDragons''
** The setting has the Imprisonment spell, which entombs the subject for an indefinite amount of time somewhere "far beneath the surface of the earth". Normally, this spell is not an example as the victim is put in [[HumanPopsicle Suspended Animation]] and won't remember any part of its imprisonment when released. However, in ''BaldursGate'' this is not the case as the player is threatened with this spell (and the emphasis of ''suffering'') by a [[KnightTemplar Harper]], and one can free a number of people from an artifact that imprisons users in the Underdark; all but two (one who'd only been in there for days, and another who was TheUndead and presumably too crazy to be affected) are alive but incurably insane.

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* ''DungeonsAndDragons''
''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons''
** The setting has the Imprisonment spell, which entombs the subject for an indefinite amount of time somewhere "far beneath the surface of the earth". Normally, this spell is not an example as the victim is put in [[HumanPopsicle Suspended Animation]] and won't remember any part of its imprisonment when released. However, in ''BaldursGate'' ''VideoGame/BaldursGate'' this is not the case as the player is threatened with this spell (and the emphasis of ''suffering'') by a [[KnightTemplar Harper]], and one can free a number of people from an artifact that imprisons users in the Underdark; all but two (one who'd only been in there for days, and another who was TheUndead and presumably too crazy to be affected) are alive but incurably insane.

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** The magic item the ''Mirror of Life Trapping'' can be used as a trap, a prison, or both. If a sentient being sees his reflection, he's drawn inside it, and kept in one of several cells, which can theoretically hold him forever. Even worse, a command word (usually known by the mirror's owner) can call a prisoner's image forth to be questioned. (The potential for abuse by diabolical villains is great; fortunately, ''all'' prisoners in a mirror can be released by breaking it, which is rather easy.)

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** It's hard to feel sorry for an [[EldrichAbomination aboleth]], but as aquatic creatures, they can't breath air for very long, and they do ''not'' "drown" if they are separated from the water too long. Instead, they enter a state called "Long Dreaming" which they consider far worse than death; a thick membrane forms around it, and it enters a state of suspended animation where it experiences hideous nightmares. (Of course, an aboleth in such a state is a sitting duck if an enemy - which is most other races - finds it, so it's usually killed soon anyway.)


* In the ''Dungeons & Dragons'' campaign setting ''TabletopGame/TheForgottenRealms'', this is the fate of all souls that are judged to be Faithless or False (that is, being a FlatEarthAtheist or subverting the faith you profess to) without another god interceding on their behalf: Their souls are stuck in the Wall of the Faithless, to spend eternity as mortar for the Wall while their souls are slowly digested into nothingness. The Wall was constructed by [[JerkassGods Myrkul]], former God of the Dead, simply because it was his prerogative to decide what would happen to souls that no-one else would take responsibility for. By the time Myrkul was dethroned many centuries later, the Wall had become a necessity because GodsNeedPrayerBadly.

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* In the ''TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms'' campaign setting for ''Dungeons & Dragons'' campaign setting ''TabletopGame/TheForgottenRealms'', Dragons'', this is the fate of all souls that are judged to be Faithless or False (that is, being a FlatEarthAtheist or subverting the faith you profess to) without another god interceding on their behalf: Their souls are stuck in the Wall of the Faithless, to spend eternity as mortar for the Wall while their souls are slowly digested into nothingness. The Wall was constructed by [[JerkassGods Myrkul]], former God of the Dead, simply because it was his prerogative to decide what would happen to souls that no-one else would take responsibility for. By the time Myrkul was dethroned many centuries later, the Wall had become a necessity because GodsNeedPrayerBadly.

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* In the ''Dungeons & Dragons'' campaign setting ''TabletopGame/TheForgottenRealms'', this is the fate of all souls that are judged to be Faithless or False (that is, being a FlatEarthAtheist or subverting the faith you profess to) without another god interceding on their behalf: Their souls are stuck in the Wall of the Faithless, to spend eternity as mortar for the Wall while their souls are slowly digested into nothingness. The Wall was constructed by [[JerkassGods Myrkul]], former God of the Dead, simply because it was his prerogative to decide what would happen to souls that no-one else would take responsibility for. By the time Myrkul was dethroned many centuries later, the Wall had become a necessity because GodsNeedPrayerBadly.

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** The Splat book ''Faces of Evil: The Fiends'' mentions the Tower of Incarnate Pain, under construction by the yugoloths on Carceri. It is made of both dead souls and any mortal beings who come to close to it; they are absorbed by the Tower and turned into bricks. Fortunately, all victims have been allowed to die eventually, because the yugoloths can't seem to keep the thing up. Three times, the geheleths have attacked the Tower and torn it into pieces, the absorbed victims screaming in the process.

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