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A common mistake made by many well-intentioned {{troper}}s is to often use the words "recent", "newest", "latest", "as of now" or something synonymous to describe something within their examples or article ({{trope}} or work pages) descriptions. This is usually after some change that shakes the foundation of the work or character. In their zeal, the troper will excitedly state that this is a very recent development, cluing other tropers that the new status is going on right this very minute.

to:

A common mistake made by many well-intentioned {{troper}}s tropers is to often use the words "recent", "newest", "latest", "as of now" or something synonymous to describe something within their examples or article ({{trope}} or work pages) descriptions. This is usually after some change that shakes the foundation of the work or character. In their zeal, the troper will excitedly state that this is a very recent development, cluing other tropers that the new status is going on right this very minute.


While Administrivia/TimestampsAreYourFriends on forums, they aren't present on wiki pages, so they're of no help there.

to:

While Administrivia/TimestampsAreYourFriends timestamps are your friends on forums, they aren't present on wiki pages, so they're of no help there.

Added DiffLines:

While Administrivia/TimestampsAreYourFriends on forums, they aren't present on wiki pages, so they're of no help there.


Wiki/TVTropes is immortal. TV Tropes does not know time. Terms such as "recently" are meaningless to TV Tropes. In other words, TV Tropes is [[TimeMarchesOn not static]].

A common mistake made by many well-intentioned {{troper}}s is to often use the words "recent", "newest", "latest", "as of now" or something synonymous to describe something within their examples or article ({{trope}} or work pages) descriptions. This is usually after some change that shakes the foundation of the work or character. In their zeal, the troper will excitedly state that this is a very recent development, cluing other tropers that the new status is going on right this very minute.

As for instance:

* "In the latest issue of ''ComicBook/{{Superman}}''..."
* "The FiveManBand has recently gotten a [[SixthRanger new member]]..."
* "The latest law in California has made it illegal for [[YuriGenre yuri fans]] to..."
* "[[Series/DoctorWho The Doctor]] just finished a mission to protect..."
* "Rumors about the new ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' game are circulating that..."
* "This movie/series/book came out X years ago..."
* "Right now, this movie is in production..."
* "Although AnyoneCanDie in this series, for now, TheProtagonist is alive."
* "X is becoming increasingly common in this series..."

This, while understandable, is unfortunately not a good practice.

As a form of {{fan myopia}}, this practice assumes that everyone who reads this will automatically know of this information. There are still some examples which describe films, episodes, issues, or volumes from ''two or more years ago'' as "recent", but if you're not a fan of said work, how will you know whether it's true or not? For all the uninitiated person would know, ComicBook/CaptainAmerica "recently" died or ''Series/BurnNotice'' is still the "[[IncrediblyLamePun hottest]] new show on Creator/USANetwork".[[note]]FYI, the death of Captain America and the debut of ''Burn Notice'' both occurred in 2007, with ''Burn Notice''[='=]s ''final'' season in 2013.[[/note]]

It also assumes everyone gets the work at the same time. People living in a different country than the one a work is released in sometimes have to wait a number of days, months, or years for that work to become legally available where they live. Some tropers will even wait until a series has either [[GrowingTheBeard established itself]], [[ScrewedByTheNetwork been cancelled]], or [[GrandFinale finished up its story]] to dig into it on an {{archive binge}}. Thus, what you may consider to be recent, may already be well known to someone else. Another problem is that "recent" is relative; if a work is centuries old, an alteration made as long ago as 1950 could technically be counted as "recent", but if the work has only been around since the 1940s, an alteration from 1950 will seem much less "recent" by comparison. It only creates more trouble for other tropers when they have to remove mentions of the word "recent" after it isn't recent anymore. Or worse, the next troper will add an indented bullet point adding an even more recent update for the situation. Or even worse, the troper will simply call the work "the latest installment" with no mention of its actual name, making it almost impossible to rewrite the example without having knowledge about the work.

If you're talking about a series that is currently in publication, don't say "the most recent episode/issue..." or "last week...". Instead, use the name or number of the segment, because that is less likely to change. If you don't know the name or number, or you're talking about something other than a series with episode titles/numbers, and there isn't one, give an approximate date ("In June of 2008", "during the Spring 2017 New York Fashion Week", or "In the fifth season finale"), or [[TheWikiRule there's bound to be a wiki]] that can help. If you still can't find anything, try and pretend that every work, ever, is published right now, at the exact same time, in the present. Don't actually put this in your edits, of course, but use it to help you refrain from slipping in a "recent" without noticing. When talking about yet-to-be-released works or installments of series, refer to the source of the information (such as a trailer or interview or promotion) rather than talk about what hasn't happened yet. That way, even if something is changed, the entries are still accurate. Also, this page's rule doesn't include terms like "the previous episode" or "later in the series" because referring to the order of publication won't ever make your edit dated. Also be wary of saying what will happen next in the series when you see promos, like "Next week X character will return", or "X character dies" - even seasoned Tropers are hoodwinked by NeverTrustATrailer.

So for everyone's sake, please avoid using the word "recent" or anything synonymous in writing your examples. Although TV Tropes is open for anyone to edit, it should not be ''required'' for anyone to come behind another troper and fix their entry, which is inevitable with any edit that dates itself.

A related phenomenon can occur when linking to websites with constantly changing content, such as webcomics, news sites or blogs. Make sure the URL actually points to the specific item you're referring to, not to the site's main page. Many sites like this have, somewhere, a "link this page" button; look for it.[[note]]Some sites have annoying auto-redirection that makes the "next page" link point to the front page when on the currently second-to-last page. This can make digging up the ''actual'' URL a bit tricky.[[/note]]

Related to Administrivia/ConversationInTheMainPage, because speaking as if the reader is every bit as up to date and excited about the work as you are is a kind of conversation.

No examples, please. Especially no "[[SelfDemonstratingArticle recent]]" ones.
----

to:

Wiki/TVTropes is immortal. TV Tropes does not know time. Terms such as "recently" are meaningless to TV Tropes. In other words, TV Tropes is [[TimeMarchesOn not static]].

A common mistake made by many well-intentioned {{troper}}s is to often use the words "recent", "newest", "latest", "as of now" or something synonymous to describe something within their examples or article ({{trope}} or work pages) descriptions.
'''''STOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ALL OF YOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOUUUUUUUUUUUUUUU!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! [=Dx=]'''''

I told you a MILLION FUCKING TIMES:
This is usually after some change that shakes '''TV TROPES''', NOT "TV NAMESPACES" or "WIKIPEDIA FOR SPAMMERS"!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! This stupid, pointless, unstoppable NAMESPACE SPAM/PLAGUE SHIT has been TAKING OVER and INVADING the foundation of the work or character. In their zeal, the troper will excitedly state that this is a very recent development, cluing other tropers that the new status is going on right this very minute.

As for instance:

* "In the latest issue of ''ComicBook/{{Superman}}''..."
* "The FiveManBand has recently gotten a [[SixthRanger new member]]..."
* "The latest law in California has made it illegal for [[YuriGenre yuri fans]] to..."
* "[[Series/DoctorWho The Doctor]] just finished a mission to protect..."
* "Rumors about the new ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' game are circulating that..."
* "This movie/series/book came out X years ago..."
* "Right now, this movie is in production..."
* "Although AnyoneCanDie in this series, for now, TheProtagonist is alive."
* "X is becoming increasingly common in this series..."

This, while understandable, is unfortunately not a good practice.

As a form of {{fan myopia}}, this practice assumes that everyone who reads this will automatically know of this information. There are still some examples
ENTIRE FUCKING SITE since fucking 2011, which describe films, episodes, issues, or volumes PISSES ME OFF!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I'm TRYING to STOP you guys from ''two or more years ago'' as "recent", but if you're not a fan of said work, how will you know whether it's true or not? For all the uninitiated person would know, ComicBook/CaptainAmerica "recently" died or ''Series/BurnNotice'' is still the "[[IncrediblyLamePun hottest]] new show on Creator/USANetwork".[[note]]FYI, the death of Captain America and the debut of ''Burn Notice'' both occurred in 2007, with ''Burn Notice''[='=]s ''final'' season in 2013.[[/note]]

It also assumes everyone gets the work at the same time. People living in a different country than the one a work is released in sometimes have to wait a number of days, months, or years for that work to become legally available where they live. Some tropers will even wait until a series has either [[GrowingTheBeard established itself]], [[ScrewedByTheNetwork been cancelled]], or [[GrandFinale finished up its story]] to dig into it on an {{archive binge}}. Thus, what you may consider
spamming your shitty ass namespaces ALL OVER random pages!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! THAT'S WHY I GOT THESE STUPID NAMESPACE EFFORT PAGES LOCKED FOR '''GOOD''' SO ALL THIS ENDLESSLY REPETITIVE SPAM SHOULD BE '''OVER''' ALREADY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! >:(

Namespaces are SUPPOSED
to be recent, may already be well known to someone else. Another problem is that "recent" is relative; if a work is centuries old, an alteration made as long ago as 1950 could technically be counted as "recent", but if the work has only been around since the 1940s, an alteration from 1950 will seem much less "recent" by comparison. It only creates more trouble ONLY used for other tropers when they have to remove mentions of the word "recent" after it isn't recent anymore. Or worse, the next troper will add an indented bullet point adding an even more recent update for the situation. Or even worse, the troper will simply call the work "the latest installment" with no mention of its actual name, making it almost impossible to rewrite the example without having knowledge about the work.

If you're talking about a series that is currently
friggin' ADAPTATIONS, NAMESAKE ARTICLES, SUBPAGES, and SUB-WIKIS, NOT workpages or "creator" pages or "Useful Notes" pages in publication, don't say "the most recent episode/issue..." or "last week...". Instead, use the name or number of the segment, because that is less likely to change. GENERAL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! If you don't know STOP spamming the name or number, or you're talking about something other than a series ENTIRE FUCKING WIKI with episode titles/numbers, and there isn't one, give an approximate date ("In June of 2008", "during the Spring 2017 New York Fashion Week", or "In the fifth season finale"), or [[TheWikiRule there's bound to be a wiki]] that can help. If you still can't find anything, try and pretend that every work, ever, is published right now, at the exact same time, in the present. Don't actually put this in your edits, of course, but use it to help you refrain from slipping in a "recent" without noticing. When talking about yet-to-be-released works or installments of series, refer to ENDLESS NAMESPACE BULLSHIT, I'm gonna TAKE DOWN these stupid ass articles for nonstop spamming and REMOVE them OFF the source of the information (such as a trailer or interview or promotion) rather than talk about what hasn't happened yet. That way, even if something is changed, the entries are still accurate. Also, this page's rule doesn't include terms like "the previous episode" or "later in the series" because referring to the order of publication won't ever make your edit dated. Also be wary of saying what will happen next in the series when you see promos, like "Next week X character will return", or "X character dies" - even seasoned Tropers are hoodwinked by NeverTrustATrailer.

So for everyone's sake, please avoid using the word "recent" or anything synonymous in writing your examples. Although TV Tropes is open for anyone to edit, it should not be ''required'' for anyone to come behind another troper and fix their entry, which is inevitable with any edit that dates itself.

A related phenomenon can occur when linking to websites with constantly changing content, such as webcomics, news sites or blogs. Make sure the URL actually points to the specific item you're referring to, not to the site's main page. Many sites like this have, somewhere, a "link this page" button; look for it.[[note]]Some sites have annoying auto-redirection that makes the "next page" link point to the front page when on the currently second-to-last page. This can make digging up the ''actual'' URL a bit tricky.[[/note]]

Related to Administrivia/ConversationInTheMainPage, because speaking as if the reader is every bit as up to date and excited about the work as you are is a kind of conversation.

No examples, please. Especially no "[[SelfDemonstratingArticle recent]]" ones.
----
site completely, ''FOREVER'' AND '''EVER'''!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! D:<


If you're talking about a series that is currently in publication, don't say "the most recent episode/issue..." or "last week...". Instead, use the name or number of the segment, because that is less likely to change. If you don't know the name or number, or you're talking about something other than a series with episode titles/numbers,and there isn't one, give an approximate date ("In June of 2008", "during the Spring 2017 New York Fashion Week", or "In the fifth season finale"), or [[TheWikiRule there's bound to be a wiki]] that can help. If you still can't find anything, try and pretend that every work, ever, is published right now, at the exact same time, in the present. Don't actually put this in your edits, of course, but use it to help you refrain from slipping in a "recent" without noticing. When talking about yet-to-be-released works or installments of series, refer to the source of the information (such as a trailer or interview or promotion) rather than talk about what hasn't happened yet. That way, even if something is changed, the entries are still accurate. Also, this page's rule doesn't include terms like "the previous episode" or "later in the series" because referring to the order of publication won't ever make your edit dated. Also be wary of saying what will happen next in the series when you see promos, like "Next week X character will return", or "X character dies" - even seasoned Tropers are hoodwinked by NeverTrustATrailer.

to:

If you're talking about a series that is currently in publication, don't say "the most recent episode/issue..." or "last week...". Instead, use the name or number of the segment, because that is less likely to change. If you don't know the name or number, or you're talking about something other than a series with episode titles/numbers,and titles/numbers, and there isn't one, give an approximate date ("In June of 2008", "during the Spring 2017 New York Fashion Week", or "In the fifth season finale"), or [[TheWikiRule there's bound to be a wiki]] that can help. If you still can't find anything, try and pretend that every work, ever, is published right now, at the exact same time, in the present. Don't actually put this in your edits, of course, but use it to help you refrain from slipping in a "recent" without noticing. When talking about yet-to-be-released works or installments of series, refer to the source of the information (such as a trailer or interview or promotion) rather than talk about what hasn't happened yet. That way, even if something is changed, the entries are still accurate. Also, this page's rule doesn't include terms like "the previous episode" or "later in the series" because referring to the order of publication won't ever make your edit dated. Also be wary of saying what will happen next in the series when you see promos, like "Next week X character will return", or "X character dies" - even seasoned Tropers are hoodwinked by NeverTrustATrailer.


If you're talking about a series that is currently in publication, don't say "the most recent episode/issue..." or "last week...". Instead, use the name or number of the segment, because that is less likely to change. If you don't know the name or number, [[TheWikiRule there's bound to be a wiki]] that can help. If you still can't find anything, try and pretend that every work, ever, is published right now, at the exact same time, in the present. Don't actually put this in your edits, of course, but use it to help you refrain from slipping in a "recent" without noticing. When talking about yet-to-be-released works or installments of series, refer to the source of the information (such as a trailer or interview or promotion) rather than talk about what hasn't happened yet. That way, even if something is changed, the entries are still accurate. Also, this page's rule doesn't include terms like "the previous episode" or "later in the series" because referring to the order of publication won't ever make your edit dated. Also be wary of saying what will happen next in the series when you see promos, like "Next week X character will return", or "X character dies" - even seasoned Tropers are hoodwinked by NeverTrustATrailer.

to:

If you're talking about a series that is currently in publication, don't say "the most recent episode/issue..." or "last week...". Instead, use the name or number of the segment, because that is less likely to change. If you don't know the name or number, or you're talking about something other than a series with episode titles/numbers,and there isn't one, give an approximate date ("In June of 2008", "during the Spring 2017 New York Fashion Week", or "In the fifth season finale"), or [[TheWikiRule there's bound to be a wiki]] that can help. If you still can't find anything, try and pretend that every work, ever, is published right now, at the exact same time, in the present. Don't actually put this in your edits, of course, but use it to help you refrain from slipping in a "recent" without noticing. When talking about yet-to-be-released works or installments of series, refer to the source of the information (such as a trailer or interview or promotion) rather than talk about what hasn't happened yet. That way, even if something is changed, the entries are still accurate. Also, this page's rule doesn't include terms like "the previous episode" or "later in the series" because referring to the order of publication won't ever make your edit dated. Also be wary of saying what will happen next in the series when you see promos, like "Next week X character will return", or "X character dies" - even seasoned Tropers are hoodwinked by NeverTrustATrailer.



A related phenomenon can occur when linking to websites with constantly changing content, such as webcomics, news sites or blogs. Make sure the URL actually points to the specific item you're referring to, not to the site's main page.[[note]]Some sites have annoying auto-redirection that makes the "next page" link point to the front page when on the currently second-to-last page. This can make digging up the ''actual'' URL a bit tricky.[[/note]]

to:

A related phenomenon can occur when linking to websites with constantly changing content, such as webcomics, news sites or blogs. Make sure the URL actually points to the specific item you're referring to, not to the site's main page. Many sites like this have, somewhere, a "link this page" button; look for it.[[note]]Some sites have annoying auto-redirection that makes the "next page" link point to the front page when on the currently second-to-last page. This can make digging up the ''actual'' URL a bit tricky.[[/note]]
[[/note]]


Wiki/TVTropes is immortal. TV Tropes does not know time. Terms such as "recently" are meaningless to TV Tropes. In other words, TV Tropes is [[TimeMarchesOn not static]].

A common mistake made by many well-intentioned {{troper}}s is to often use the words "recent", "newest", "latest", "as of now" or something synonymous to describe something within their examples or article ({{trope}} or work pages) descriptions. This is usually after some change that shakes the foundation of the work or character. In their zeal, the troper will excitedly state that this is a very recent development, cluing other tropers that the new status is going on right this very minute.

As for instance:

* "In the latest issue of ''ComicBook/{{Superman}}''..."
* "The FiveManBand has recently gotten a [[SixthRanger new member]]..."
* "The latest law in California has made it illegal for [[YuriGenre yuri fans]] to..."
* "[[Series/DoctorWho The Doctor]] just finished a mission to protect..."
* "Rumors about the new ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' game are circulating that..."
* "This movie/series/book came out X years ago..."
* "Right now, this movie is in production..."
* "Although AnyoneCanDie in this series, for now, TheProtagonist is alive."
* "X is becoming increasingly common in this series..."

This, while understandable, is unfortunately not a good practice.

As a form of {{fan myopia}}, this practice assumes that everyone who reads this will automatically know of this information. There are still some examples which describe films, episodes, issues, or volumes from ''two or more years ago'' as "recent", but if you're not a fan of said work, how will you know whether it's true or not? For all the uninitiated person would know, ComicBook/CaptainAmerica "recently" died or ''Series/BurnNotice'' is still the "[[IncrediblyLamePun hottest]] new show on Creator/USANetwork".[[note]]FYI, the death of Captain America and the debut of ''Burn Notice'' both occurred in 2007, with ''Burn Notice''[='=]s ''final'' season in 2013.[[/note]]

It also assumes everyone gets the work at the same time. People living in a different country than the one a work is released in sometimes have to wait a number of days, months, or years for that work to become legally available where they live. Some tropers will even wait until a series has either [[GrowingTheBeard established itself]], [[ScrewedByTheNetwork been cancelled]], or [[GrandFinale finished up its story]] to dig into it on an {{archive binge}}. Thus, what you may consider to be recent, may already be well known to someone else. Another problem is that "recent" is relative; if a work is centuries old, an alteration made as long ago as 1950 could technically be counted as "recent", but if the work has only been around since the 1940s, an alteration from 1950 will seem much less "recent" by comparison. It only creates more trouble for other tropers when they have to remove mentions of the word "recent" after it isn't recent anymore. Or worse, the next troper will add an indented bullet point adding an even more recent update for the situation. Or even worse, the troper will simply call the work "the latest installment" with no mention of its actual name, making it almost impossible to rewrite the example without having knowledge about the work.

If you're talking about a series that is currently in publication, don't say "the most recent episode/issue..." or "last week...". Instead, use the name or number of the segment, because that is less likely to change. If you don't know the name or number, [[TheWikiRule there's bound to be a wiki]] that can help. If you still can't find anything, try and pretend that every work, ever, is published right now, at the exact same time, in the present. Don't actually put this in your edits, of course, but use it to help you refrain from slipping in a "recent" without noticing. When talking about yet-to-be-released works or installments of series, refer to the source of the information (such as a trailer or interview or promotion) rather than talk about what hasn't happened yet. That way, even if something is changed, the entries are still accurate. Also, this page's rule doesn't include terms like "the previous episode" or "later in the series" because referring to the order of publication won't ever make your edit dated. Also be wary of saying what will happen next in the series when you see promos, like "Next week X character will return", or "X character dies" - even seasoned Tropers are hoodwinked by NeverTrustATrailer.

So for everyone's sake, please avoid using the word "recent" or anything synonymous in writing your examples. Although TV Tropes is open for anyone to edit, it should not be ''required'' for anyone to come behind another troper and fix their entry, which is inevitable with any edit that dates itself.

A related phenomenon can occur when linking to websites with constantly changing content, such as webcomics, news sites or blogs. Make sure the URL actually points to the specific item you're referring to, not to the site's main page.[[note]]Some sites have annoying auto-redirection that makes the "next page" link point to the front page when on the currently second-to-last page. This can make digging up the ''actual'' URL a bit tricky.[[/note]]

Related to Administrivia/ConversationInTheMainPage, because speaking as if the reader is every bit as up to date and excited about the work as you are is a kind of conversation.

No examples, please. Especially no "[[SelfDemonstratingArticle recent]]" ones.
----

to:

Wiki/TVTropes is immortal. TV Tropes does not know time. Terms such as "recently" are meaningless to TV Tropes. In other words, TV Tropes is [[TimeMarchesOn not static]].

A common mistake made by many well-intentioned {{troper}}s is to often use the words "recent", "newest", "latest", "as of now" or something synonymous to describe something within their examples or article ({{trope}} or work pages) descriptions.
'''''STOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ALL OF YOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOUUUUUUUUUUUUUUU!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! [=Dx=]'''''

I told you a MILLION FUCKING TIMES:
This is usually after some change that shakes '''TV TROPES''', NOT "TV NAMESPACES" or "WIKIPEDIA FOR SPAMMERS"!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! This stupid, pointless, unstoppable NAMESPACE SPAM/PLAGUE SHIT has been TAKING OVER and INVADING the foundation of the work or character. In their zeal, the troper will excitedly state that this is a very recent development, cluing other tropers that the new status is going on right this very minute.

As for instance:

* "In the latest issue of ''ComicBook/{{Superman}}''..."
* "The FiveManBand has recently gotten a [[SixthRanger new member]]..."
* "The latest law in California has made it illegal for [[YuriGenre yuri fans]] to..."
* "[[Series/DoctorWho The Doctor]] just finished a mission to protect..."
* "Rumors about the new ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' game are circulating that..."
* "This movie/series/book came out X years ago..."
* "Right now, this movie is in production..."
* "Although AnyoneCanDie in this series, for now, TheProtagonist is alive."
* "X is becoming increasingly common in this series..."

This, while understandable, is unfortunately not a good practice.

As a form of {{fan myopia}}, this practice assumes that everyone who reads this will automatically know of this information. There are still some examples
ENTIRE FUCKING SITE since fucking 2011, which describe films, episodes, issues, or volumes PISSES ME OFF!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I'm TRYING to STOP you guys from ''two or more years ago'' as "recent", but if you're not a fan of said work, how will you know whether it's true or not? For all the uninitiated person would know, ComicBook/CaptainAmerica "recently" died or ''Series/BurnNotice'' is still the "[[IncrediblyLamePun hottest]] new show on Creator/USANetwork".[[note]]FYI, the death of Captain America and the debut of ''Burn Notice'' both occurred in 2007, with ''Burn Notice''[='=]s ''final'' season in 2013.[[/note]]

It also assumes everyone gets the work at the same time. People living in a different country than the one a work is released in sometimes have to wait a number of days, months, or years for that work to become legally available where they live. Some tropers will even wait until a series has either [[GrowingTheBeard established itself]], [[ScrewedByTheNetwork been cancelled]], or [[GrandFinale finished up its story]] to dig into it on an {{archive binge}}. Thus, what you may consider
spamming your shitty ass namespaces ALL OVER random pages!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! THAT'S WHY I GOT THESE STUPID NAMESPACE EFFORT PAGES LOCKED FOR '''GOOD''' SO ALL THIS ENDLESSLY REPETITIVE SPAM SHOULD BE '''OVER''' ALREADY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! >:(

Namespaces are SUPPOSED
to be recent, may already be well known to someone else. Another problem is that "recent" is relative; if a work is centuries old, an alteration made as long ago as 1950 could technically be counted as "recent", but if the work has only been around since the 1940s, an alteration from 1950 will seem much less "recent" by comparison. It only creates more trouble ONLY used for other tropers when they have to remove mentions of the word "recent" after it isn't recent anymore. Or worse, the next troper will add an indented bullet point adding an even more recent update for the situation. Or even worse, the troper will simply call the work "the latest installment" with no mention of its actual name, making it almost impossible to rewrite the example without having knowledge about the work.

If you're talking about a series that is currently
friggin' ADAPTATIONS, NAMESAKE ARTICLES, SUBPAGES, and SUB-WIKIS, NOT workpages or "creator" pages or "Useful Notes" pages in publication, don't say "the most recent episode/issue..." or "last week...". Instead, use the name or number of the segment, because that is less likely to change. GENERAL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! If you don't know STOP spamming the name or number, [[TheWikiRule there's bound to be a wiki]] that can help. If you still can't find anything, try and pretend that every work, ever, is published right now, at the exact same time, in the present. Don't actually put this in ENTIRE FUCKING WIKI with your edits, of course, but use it to help you refrain from slipping in a "recent" without noticing. When talking about yet-to-be-released works or installments of series, refer to ENDLESS NAMESPACE BULLSHIT, I'm gonna TAKE DOWN these stupid ass articles for nonstop spamming and REMOVE them OFF the source of the information (such as a trailer or interview or promotion) rather than talk about what hasn't happened yet. That way, even if something is changed, the entries are still accurate. Also, this page's rule doesn't include terms like "the previous episode" or "later in the series" because referring to the order of publication won't ever make your edit dated. Also be wary of saying what will happen next in the series when you see promos, like "Next week X character will return", or "X character dies" - even seasoned Tropers are hoodwinked by NeverTrustATrailer.

So for everyone's sake, please avoid using the word "recent" or anything synonymous in writing your examples. Although TV Tropes is open for anyone to edit, it should not be ''required'' for anyone to come behind another troper and fix their entry, which is inevitable with any edit that dates itself.

A related phenomenon can occur when linking to websites with constantly changing content, such as webcomics, news sites or blogs. Make sure the URL actually points to the specific item you're referring to, not to the site's main page.[[note]]Some sites have annoying auto-redirection that makes the "next page" link point to the front page when on the currently second-to-last page. This can make digging up the ''actual'' URL a bit tricky.[[/note]]

Related to Administrivia/ConversationInTheMainPage, because speaking as if the reader is every bit as up to date and excited about the work as you are is a kind of conversation.

No examples, please. Especially no "[[SelfDemonstratingArticle recent]]" ones.
----
site completely, ''FOREVER'' AND '''EVER'''!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! D:<


If you're talking about a series that is currently in publication, don't say "the most recent episode/issue..." or "last week...". Instead, use the name or number of the segment, because that is less likely to change. If you don't know the name or number, [[TheWikiRule there's bound to be a wiki]] that can help. If you still can't find anything, try and pretend that every work, ever, is published right now, at the exact same time, in the present. Don't actually put this in your edits, of course, but use it to help you refrain from slipping in a "recent" without noticing. When talking about yet-to-be-released works or installments of series, refer to the source of the information (such as a trailer or interview or promotion) rather than talk about what hasn't happened yet. That way, even if something is changed, the entries are still accurate. Also, this page's rule doesn't include terms like "the previous episode" or "later in the series" because referring to the order of publication won't ever make your edit dated. Also be wary of saying what will happen next in the series, like "Next week X character will return", in the promos "X character dies" - even seasoned Tropers are hoodwinked by NeverTrustATrailer.

to:

If you're talking about a series that is currently in publication, don't say "the most recent episode/issue..." or "last week...". Instead, use the name or number of the segment, because that is less likely to change. If you don't know the name or number, [[TheWikiRule there's bound to be a wiki]] that can help. If you still can't find anything, try and pretend that every work, ever, is published right now, at the exact same time, in the present. Don't actually put this in your edits, of course, but use it to help you refrain from slipping in a "recent" without noticing. When talking about yet-to-be-released works or installments of series, refer to the source of the information (such as a trailer or interview or promotion) rather than talk about what hasn't happened yet. That way, even if something is changed, the entries are still accurate. Also, this page's rule doesn't include terms like "the previous episode" or "later in the series" because referring to the order of publication won't ever make your edit dated. Also be wary of saying what will happen next in the series, series when you see promos, like "Next week X character will return", in the promos or "X character dies" - even seasoned Tropers are hoodwinked by NeverTrustATrailer.


"Next" is also a shaky word. If see a promo you say on a page "In the next episode X will be back", you're already putting a time limit on what you are saying. Better to avoid it until the episode comes out and then you'll know for sure.

If you're talking about a series that is currently in publication, don't say "the most recent episode/issue..." or "last week...". Instead, use the name or number of the segment, because that is less likely to change. If you don't know the name or number, [[TheWikiRule there's bound to be a wiki]] that can help. If you still can't find anything, try and pretend that every work, ever, is published right now, at the exact same time, in the present. Don't actually put this in your edits, of course, but use it to help you refrain from slipping in a "recent" without noticing. When talking about yet-to-be-released works or installments of series, refer to the source of the information (such as a trailer or interview or promotion) rather than talk about what hasn't happened yet. That way, even if something is changed, the entries are still accurate. Also, this page's rule doesn't include terms like "the previous episode" or "later in the series" because referring to the order of publication won't ever make your edit dated.

to:

"Next" is also a shaky word. If see a promo you say on a page "In the next episode X will be back", you're already putting a time limit on what you are saying. Better to avoid it until the episode comes out and then you'll know for sure.

If you're talking about a series that is currently in publication, don't say "the most recent episode/issue..." or "last week...". Instead, use the name or number of the segment, because that is less likely to change. If you don't know the name or number, [[TheWikiRule there's bound to be a wiki]] that can help. If you still can't find anything, try and pretend that every work, ever, is published right now, at the exact same time, in the present. Don't actually put this in your edits, of course, but use it to help you refrain from slipping in a "recent" without noticing. When talking about yet-to-be-released works or installments of series, refer to the source of the information (such as a trailer or interview or promotion) rather than talk about what hasn't happened yet. That way, even if something is changed, the entries are still accurate. Also, this page's rule doesn't include terms like "the previous episode" or "later in the series" because referring to the order of publication won't ever make your edit dated.
dated. Also be wary of saying what will happen next in the series, like "Next week X character will return", in the promos "X character dies" - even seasoned Tropers are hoodwinked by NeverTrustATrailer.

Added DiffLines:

"Next" is also a shaky word. If see a promo you say on a page "In the next episode X will be back", you're already putting a time limit on what you are saying. Better to avoid it until the episode comes out and then you'll know for sure.


It also assumes everyone gets the work at the same time. People living in a different country than the one a work is released in sometimes have to wait a number of days, months, or years for that work to become legally available where they live. Some tropers will even wait until a series has either [[GrowingTheBeard established itself]], [[ScrewedByTheNetwork been cancelled]], or [[GrandFinale finished up its story]] to dig into it on an {{archive binge}}. Thus, what you may consider to be recent, may already be well known to someone else. Another problem is that "recent" is relative; if a work is centuries old, an alteration made as long ago as 1950 could technically be counted as "recent", but if the work has only been around since the 1940s, an alteration from 1950 will seem much less "recent" by comparison.

It only creates more trouble for other tropers when they have to remove mentions of the word "recent" after it isn't recent anymore. Or worse, the next troper will add an indented bullet point adding an even more recent update for the situation. Or even worse, the troper will simply call the work "the latest installment" with no mention of its actual name, making it almost impossible to rewrite the example without having knowledge about the work. If you're talking about a series that is currently in publication, don't say "the most recent episode/issue..." or "last week...". Instead, use the name or number of the segment, because that is less likely to change. If you don't know the name or number, [[TheWikiRule there's bound to be a wiki]] that can help. If you still can't find anything, try and pretend that every work, ever, is published right now, at the exact same time, in the present. Don't actually put this in your edits, of course, but use it to help you refrain from slipping in a "recent" without noticing. When talking about yet-to-be-released works or installments of series, refer to the source of the information (such as a trailer or interview or promotion) rather than talk about what hasn't happened yet. That way, even if something is changed, the entries are still accurate. Also, this page's rule doesn't include terms like "the previous episode" or "later in the series" because referring to the order of publication won't ever make your edit dated.

to:

It also assumes everyone gets the work at the same time. People living in a different country than the one a work is released in sometimes have to wait a number of days, months, or years for that work to become legally available where they live. Some tropers will even wait until a series has either [[GrowingTheBeard established itself]], [[ScrewedByTheNetwork been cancelled]], or [[GrandFinale finished up its story]] to dig into it on an {{archive binge}}. Thus, what you may consider to be recent, may already be well known to someone else. Another problem is that "recent" is relative; if a work is centuries old, an alteration made as long ago as 1950 could technically be counted as "recent", but if the work has only been around since the 1940s, an alteration from 1950 will seem much less "recent" by comparison. \n\n It only creates more trouble for other tropers when they have to remove mentions of the word "recent" after it isn't recent anymore. Or worse, the next troper will add an indented bullet point adding an even more recent update for the situation. Or even worse, the troper will simply call the work "the latest installment" with no mention of its actual name, making it almost impossible to rewrite the example without having knowledge about the work.

If you're talking about a series that is currently in publication, don't say "the most recent episode/issue..." or "last week...". Instead, use the name or number of the segment, because that is less likely to change. If you don't know the name or number, [[TheWikiRule there's bound to be a wiki]] that can help. If you still can't find anything, try and pretend that every work, ever, is published right now, at the exact same time, in the present. Don't actually put this in your edits, of course, but use it to help you refrain from slipping in a "recent" without noticing. When talking about yet-to-be-released works or installments of series, refer to the source of the information (such as a trailer or interview or promotion) rather than talk about what hasn't happened yet. That way, even if something is changed, the entries are still accurate. Also, this page's rule doesn't include terms like "the previous episode" or "later in the series" because referring to the order of publication won't ever make your edit dated.


It only creates more trouble for other tropers when they have to remove mentions of the word "recent" after it isn't recent anymore. Or worse, the next troper will add an indented bullet point adding an even more recent update for the situation. Or even worse, the troper will simply call the work "the latest installment" with no mention of its actual name, making it almost impossible to rewrite the example without having knowledge about the work. So for everyone's sake, please avoid using the word "recent" or anything synonymous in writing your examples. Although TV Tropes is open for anyone to edit, it should not be ''required'' for anyone to come behind another troper and fix their entry, which is inevitable with any edit that dates itself.

If you're talking about a series that is currently in publication, don't say "the most recent episode/issue..." or "last week...". Instead, use the name or number of the segment, because that is less likely to change. If you don't know the name or number, [[TheWikiRule there's bound to be a wiki]] that can help. If you still can't find anything, try and pretend that every work, ever, is published right now, at the exact same time, in the present. Don't actually put this in your edits, of course, but use it to help you refrain from slipping in a "recent" without noticing. When talking about yet-to-be-released works or installments of series, refer to the source of the information (such as a trailer or interview or promotion) rather than talk about what hasn't happened yet. That way, even if something is changed, the entries are still accurate. Also, this page's rule doesn't include terms like "the previous episode" or "later in the series" because referring to the order of publication won't ever make your edit dated.

to:

It only creates more trouble for other tropers when they have to remove mentions of the word "recent" after it isn't recent anymore. Or worse, the next troper will add an indented bullet point adding an even more recent update for the situation. Or even worse, the troper will simply call the work "the latest installment" with no mention of its actual name, making it almost impossible to rewrite the example without having knowledge about the work. So for everyone's sake, please avoid using the word "recent" or anything synonymous in writing your examples. Although TV Tropes is open for anyone to edit, it should not be ''required'' for anyone to come behind another troper and fix their entry, which is inevitable with any edit that dates itself.\n\n If you're talking about a series that is currently in publication, don't say "the most recent episode/issue..." or "last week...". Instead, use the name or number of the segment, because that is less likely to change. If you don't know the name or number, [[TheWikiRule there's bound to be a wiki]] that can help. If you still can't find anything, try and pretend that every work, ever, is published right now, at the exact same time, in the present. Don't actually put this in your edits, of course, but use it to help you refrain from slipping in a "recent" without noticing. When talking about yet-to-be-released works or installments of series, refer to the source of the information (such as a trailer or interview or promotion) rather than talk about what hasn't happened yet. That way, even if something is changed, the entries are still accurate. Also, this page's rule doesn't include terms like "the previous episode" or "later in the series" because referring to the order of publication won't ever make your edit dated.
dated.

So for everyone's sake, please avoid using the word "recent" or anything synonymous in writing your examples. Although TV Tropes is open for anyone to edit, it should not be ''required'' for anyone to come behind another troper and fix their entry, which is inevitable with any edit that dates itself.


If you're talking about a series that is currently in publication, don't say "the most recent episode/issue..." or "last week...". Instead, use the name or number of the segment, because that is less likely to change. If you don't know the name or number, [[TheWikiRule there's bound to be a wiki]] that can help. If you still can't find anything, try and pretend that every work, ever, is published right now, at the exact same time, in the present. Don't actually put this in your edits, of course, but use it to help you refrain from slipping in a "recent" without noticing. When talking about yet-to-be-released works or installments of series, refer to the source of the information (such as a trailer or interview or promotion) rather than talk about what hasn't happened yet. That way, even if something is changed, the entries are still accurate. This doesn't include terms like "the previous episode" or "later in the series" because the order of publication isn't referring to real time.

to:

If you're talking about a series that is currently in publication, don't say "the most recent episode/issue..." or "last week...". Instead, use the name or number of the segment, because that is less likely to change. If you don't know the name or number, [[TheWikiRule there's bound to be a wiki]] that can help. If you still can't find anything, try and pretend that every work, ever, is published right now, at the exact same time, in the present. Don't actually put this in your edits, of course, but use it to help you refrain from slipping in a "recent" without noticing. When talking about yet-to-be-released works or installments of series, refer to the source of the information (such as a trailer or interview or promotion) rather than talk about what hasn't happened yet. That way, even if something is changed, the entries are still accurate. This Also, this page's rule doesn't include terms like "the previous episode" or "later in the series" because referring to the order of publication isn't referring to real time.
won't ever make your edit dated.

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