YMMV: Mrs. Doubtfire

  • Adaptation Displacement: Of the British young adult book Madame Doubtfire (Or Alias Madame Doubtfire in the US.). Notable differences include:
    • The parents are already divorced at the start of the story.
    • Miranda is a much meaner, bitchier character. Daniel is no saint either though as he fantasizes about ways to kill her...in front of the kids.
    • Daniel has a passion for gardening. In the end he becomes not the host of a kid's show but Miranda's new gardener.
    • All three kids see through the Mrs. Doubtfire disguise, even Christopher, though it takes him a little longer.
    • Mrs. Doubtfire doesn't wear a latex mask and padding. She wears a turban. This is apparently enough to fool Miranda.
    • Rather than learn housekeeping skills, Daniel forces the children to clean the house by threatening how they'll never see him again if he's found out.
  • Alternative Character Interpretation: Daniel Hillard — loving father who desperately wants to raise his kids, or creepily obsessed stalker?
    • Even lampshaded a bit in-movie, both by Daniel himself ("What am I doing here? This is beyond obsession.") and by the judge, once the gig is up, as the reason for ordering supervision during Daniel's time with the kids.
      • In some ways, this also applies to Miranda. Is she a mature woman who has put up with Daniel's antics over the years and has finally reached her breaking point, or is she a cold detached woman more interested in her career than her family? Her apparent mooning over her old flame prior to telling Daniel it's over doesn't help her cause any.
      • Indeed, leading to wondering over the interpretation of whether she's sincerely at the end of her rope with a situation that's bad for her and her children, or just looking for an excuse to dump her current husband for her more attractive, more successful, and less silly ex?
  • Designated Villain: Stu is an exceptionally caring and polite individual to Miranda and the kids, so much so that Daniel sabotaging their relationship can come off as unnecessarily spiteful.
    • This is likely intentional and Stu is not intended to be a villainous character per se, see Romantic False Lead on the main page.
  • Fridge Brilliance: Daniel quits a kid's cartoon because it doesn't condemn smoking harshly enough for his liking. When you see how devoted he is to his children, it makes him look a lot more responsible as a parent.
  • "Funny Aneurysm" Moment: Daniel gets his titular alias from a newspaper headline saying "Police Doubt Fire Was Accidental". In January 2015, the house used for the Hillard home got attacked by an arsonist. After Williams' death, the house was serving as an impromptu memorial as well.
  • Harsher in Hindsight: It's harder to see the scenes with Daniel talking about how obsessed he is over his family after watching him as Sy in One Hour Photo...
    • Daniel says he can't live without his kids, just like he can't live without air. Robin Williams committed suicide by hanging himself.
    • Early on in the movie, there are scenes of Daniel struggling with depression and denial. These moments became a lot tougher to watch after Robin Williams was Driven to Suicide by a struggle with depression.
    • Mrs. Doubtfire's last heartfelt sign off at the end of the film is bittersweet enough; it's that much sadder now that the actor who brought her to life has passed on, making her last heard goodbye at the end that much more final.
  • Heartwarming in Hindsight: After Robin Williams' death, Mara Wilson paraphrased her most famous line from the film, saying of all the younger people who either worked with him or were fans "We're all his goddamn kids too."
  • Hilarious in Hindsight: It won't be the last time Pierce Brosnan played a man who was outsmarted by an elderly British lady.
    • In MAD Magazine's parody of this movie, there's a panel where the judge in the final hearing asks, "And now for the next case: Should the career of Pierce Brosnan be declared legally dead?" Ummmm....no.
  • Informed Wrongness: While his wife does seem like an old "battle-axe", you be pissed too if there was a horse and a big mess in your house
  • Internet Backdraft: The "wars" between Daniel supporters and Miranda supporters have even reached this very wiki.
  • Jerkass Woobie: Daniel's predicament could have been avoided if he weren't so immature. Despite that, he does genuinely live for his children and it does seem unfair from his point of view that they'd be with their career-obsessed mother more than him.
  • Retroactive Recognition: For the twenty-somethings who grew up with Pierce Brosnan as James Bond. Oddly enough, people of the time thought of a similar cloak and dagger character "Hey, it's Remington Steele!"
  • Some Anvils Need to Be Dropped: This film, though hilarious, is one of the most realistic depictions of divorce in cinema (Kramer vs. Kramer is another possible member of this category). Daniel and Miranda are both presented as having valid reasons to separate (Miranda is frustrated by Daniel's chronic lack of work and carefree attitude, while Daniel is angered by her uptight nature and tendency to put her job first); we get to see both sides of the issue, which prevents the audience from making snap judgments. The end of the film becomes even more direct with this trope: Daniel and Miranda don't get back together,, and Mrs. Doubtfire, on her new TV show, explains that sometimes, divorce can be a good thing, especially if their are children involved (she implies that staying together for kids can actually be more damaging). Depicting divorce as a positive is unexpected, and the movie does drive it home repeatedly, but it's a message that needs to be shared, especially to children.
    • In the speech mentioned above, Mrs. Doubtfire lists several non-traditional family patterns (foster parents, living with other relatives, etc.), and assures children that the names don't matter—family is about love. Subtle? No. Extremely important and valid? Yes.
  • Tear Jerker: Two specific moments in the movie: Daniel's speech to the judge explaining why he dressed up as Mrs. Doubtfire, only to have the judge impose harsher limits on his visitation rights, and Daniel's/Mrs. Doubtfire's response to a letter from a child whose parents are separating... which serves as background narration for the Bittersweet Ending in which Miranda revokes said limits.
    • Chris actually blames himself for the marriage going south, since it was his birthday party that caused his parents to start fighting. Daniel assures him it wasn't his fault and that it would have happened eventually.
  • WTH, Casting Agency?: And featuring Harvey Fierstein as Robin Williams' brother! Wait, what?