YMMV / Limp Bizkit

  • Bonus Material:
    • A special edition of Significant Other has a bonus disc with live performances.
    • American limited edition of Chocolate Starfish and the Hot Dog Flavored Water has a bonus track, "It's Like That Y'All", featuring Run–D.M.C.. The Japanese limited edition has the rare track "Crushed", and two tracks from Three Dollar Bill Y'all$.
    • Deluxe edition of "New Old Songs" has three additional remixes of "My Way".
    • UK edition of Results May Vary has the bonus track "Let It Go". Japan edition has this track, and one more track: "Armpit".
    • Some versions of Greatest Hitz ends with "The Truth", from The Unquestionable Truth (Part 1).
    • Gold Cobra had a Deluxe version with three extra songs ("Back Porch, "My Own Cobain", and "Angels"), a different deluxe edition which had an extra song along with the three others depending on where you were. In Europe it was "Los Angeles", in the US, it was "Middle Finger", and in Japan, it was "Combat Jazz"
  • Covered Up: With regards to The Who's "Behind Blue Eyes", and George Michael's "Faith", to the extent of making people to believe that those are original songs made by them.
  • Critic-Proof: The album Chocolate Starfish and the Hotdog Flavored Water, which received mostly negative reviews but was extremely successful, selling over a million copies in just its first week alone. Likewise "Results May Vary" was one of the worst reviewed albums of all time, but still managed to go platinum.
  • Deader Than Disco: Limp Bizkit was one of the biggest bands of 1999, and received pretty favorable reviews for their album Significant Other. Only a few years later, however, they had almost completely dropped off of the air waves and were routinely used as a punchline in the media, even by radio stations that had previously put them in heavy rotation. Though they did get a resurgence in popularity when Gold Cobra was released.
  • Ear Worm:
  • Ensemble Dark Horse: Wes Borland is the most loved and respected member of the band, and his other projects, particularly Black Light Burns, have received more favorable reviews than Limp Bizkit.
    • Even at the height of their Hatedom, a good chunk of the haters grudgingly admitted that Three Dollar Bill, Y'all$ was actually not bad.
  • Even Better Sequel: Three Dollar Bill, Y'all$ has its fans, but Significant Other is where the Limp Bizkit sound really solidified itself.
  • Face of the Band: Durst was considered to be this by many, but his role in the band has been largely overshadowed by Borland, so much so that if you load up the band's official website, Borland is the one in the background photograph.
  • Fandom Rivalry: With Slipknot, Metallica or Linkin Park fans.
  • Genre-Killer: They were probably more responsible than anyone else for killing nu metal. At their absolute biggest, they were the face of nu metal. Even Korn was overshadowed by them, Slipknot, Mudvayne, Disturbed, and Linkin Park were all in their infancy, and Deftones had already ditched the genre. If you look at cultural depictions of nu metal from 1999-2002, Limp Bizkit was the template, and they were probably one of the biggest bands on the planet at that time. When they fell, they fell hard, but it wasn't even Results May Vary that destroyed them (though it didn't help), it's that people were sick of them. The Chicago date of the 2003 Summer Sanitarium Tour provided a pretty accurate look at what mainstream audiences thought of them by the end, and within nu metal, there was the perception that they had made the genre turn into everything that it shouldn't have been: a moronic, creatively bankrupt cash cow that had gone from being music made by and for the kids who got slammed into lockers and called faggots in high school to music being made by and for the kids doing the shoving, and it led to a very real effort within the genre well before they ever actually fell to make it crash and burn. When they finally did implode, they had become so thoroughly intertwined with nu metal as a consistently viable mainstream genre that they took everything down with them, and the bands that did survive either did so through sheer dumb luck or by having attracted different audiences that didn't give a shit about nu metal as a whole.
  • Germans Love David Hasselhoff: A literal example. While Limp Bizkit has received a significant Hype Backlash in their native US since their heyday in the late 1990s (the planned North American leg of their most recent tour was cancelled due to low ticket sales), the band still has a reasonably large following in several European countries, namely Germany, Austria, and the Low Countries.
  • He Really Can Act: Fred Durst surprised many critics with his acting in Population 436, and his directorial debut, The Education of Charlie Banks. Moreover, even those that hated Limp Bizkit admitted that "Walking Away", from their Gold Cobra album, was a pretty good song.
  • Memetic Mutation:
  • Misattributed Song: The demo version of "Don't Go Off Wandering", which features Serj Tankian, has been labeled as a System of a Down song on bootlegs and YouTube.
  • Misaimed Fandom: Durst regrets that many of the band's songs, which were written as a release for being bullied when he was younger, ended up being popular favorites among the kind of people that used to bully him.
  • Mis-blamed: Nobody can exactly pinpoint where Woodstock '99 went to hell (because it was such an almighty clusterfuck on almost every conceivable level; important things like food and restroom conveniecne were completley ruined). As a result, whether Durst is to blame or not has become a topic of debate.
  • Narm:
    • The Speak-N-Spell solo in their cover of "Behind Blue Eyes". See Memetic Mutation above.
    • Also, whenever Fred gets so angry that it becomes over the top. Case in point, his threatening to call a sniper in "I'm Broke" because he loaned money to somebody who didn't pay him back promptly, or "Full Nelson"'s dual obsessions with making himself look hardcore and punching people in the face.
    • "No Sex" is a slow, melancholic and gut-burstingly hilarious ballad in which Fred whines about having too much sex with somebody. This comes after "Don't Go Off Wandering", where he angrily rails against somebody who denied him sex, and left him with a case of blue balls.
    • Fred's tendencies to swear god knows how many times is this for people, especially when one looks at "Hot Dog" and it's all swears.
  • Never Live It Down: Fred's behavior once he became famous.
  • Nightmare Fuel: The video for "Boiler".
  • Painful Rhyme: In their cover of "Faith", the line "Has got a body like you" was changed to "Has got a body like me" without changing the part it was supposed to rhyme with.
  • Signature Song: The "Faith" cover, "Nookie", "Rollin' (Air Raid Vehicle)" and "Take a Look Around".
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