Trivia / Casino Royale (1967)

  • Billing Displacement: Peter Sellers signed on back when the film was serious. At that point, it was intended to be a vehicle for David Niven. Much rewriting and scene-stealing later, Sellers actually ends up with top billing alongside Ursula Andress. This wouldn't be the first time Sellers entirely stole what was intended to be a vehicle for Niven.
  • Breakaway Pop Hit: "The Look of Love", due to severe Mood Whiplash (see the main page).
  • Creator Backlash: Got a DEFCON-1 level backlash from EON, who became hell-bent on preventing any other Bond production not authorized by them from taking place, setting the stage for their feud with McClory later.
    • Also got one from star Peter Sellers, who wanted a serious Bond film but wound up with another comedy that he was ejected from.
  • Creator Killer:
    • A sadly literal instance. The stress of making the film caused producer Charles K. Feldman to develop heart problems, which claimed his life just two years after its release.
    • A less lethal instance happened to all of the film's directors except for John Huston. All of them had fairly distinguished careers prior to working on this film, but none of them had anywhere near the same success afterwards. Probably the worst affected was Val Guest; after word got out that he had taken over as the primary director late in production, he got unfairly blamed for the resulting mess and was reduced to directing Awful British Sex Comedies for the rest of his career.
  • The Danza: Terence Cooper as Coop.
  • Dueling Movies: It was released in the same year as an official Bond, You Only Live Twice. This duel affected the official release to the point where it became one of the factors in the long and bitter Broccoli/McClory legal feud that started a decade later and only fully ended in 2013, 7 years after McClory's death and nearly 5 decades from when You Only Live Twice and Casino Royale 1967 hit theaters.
  • Franchise Killer: This one Bond spoof's critical and popular thrashing and EON getting the blame for it convinced them to go hard after anything even remotely resembling James Bond, which became a HUGE problem with Kevin McClory 10 years later. Only Mike Myers's Austin Powers series has been able to skirt by this.
    • The film's failure with film critics and Bond fans, it being responsible for producer Charles Feldman's death, and it becoming one of the roots of the ugly EON vs Kevin McClory rivalry tainted its reputation so badly, no other attempts were made to adapt Casino Royale until EON themselves used it as the starting point for their rebooted Bond series.
  • Not Screened for Critics: No advance press screenings of Casino Royale were held, leading reviews to appear only after the film's premiere.
  • Old Shame: For the actual Bond copyright holder EON and for the movie's cast.
  • Screwed by the Lawyers / Channel Hop: Columbia Pictures lost the rights to the film after they got entangled in a lawsuit by MGM/UA and Eon Productions (they wanted to make a rival Bond series, holding already the rights to Casino Royale and allying with Kevin McClory, who helped with Thunderball), trading them and the book rights for the ones MGM held to Spider-Man (which then became Columbia's own Cash Cow Franchise before it stalled in 2014 and prompted them to integrate it into Disney/Marvel's MCU).
  • Star-Derailing Role: Proved to be this for Peter Sellers, starting a downward trajectory for his career that lasted eight years before a Career Resurrection.
  • Troubled Production: Not only an obscene number of directors and screenwriters got involved, but the actors fought with them. And with each other — the reason that Evelyn Tremble and Le Chiffre are not seen in the same shot during the Baccarat scene is that when they tried to get Peter Sellers and Orson Welles in the same studio, Sellers balked. He felt that Welles was not taking the scene seriously (remember that Sellers had wanted the movie to be the straight adaptation he was promised and was increasingly enraged over the continual slide into wacky parody the script was taking). Sellers was also an extremely superstitious man and took exception to Welles performing magic tricks during shooting, and finally refused to appear at the same time with Welles, forcing their lines to be shot at separate times.
  • What Could Have Been: The producer had intended to cast Sean Connery as Bond, but balked at the star's paycheck demands ($1 million, which wasn't cheap back then). It is assumed that had Connery been cast, it would have been a straight 007 film rather than the parody it would eventually become. Years later, Connery ran into the producer and told him it would have been much better if he had agreed to the million-dollar paycheck.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Trivia/CasinoRoyale1967