Trivia: Albedo: Erma Felna EDF

  • Ash Can Copy: The famous #0 issue is technically a prototype of the ILR's invasion to Derzon, but without named characters (or Erma included) and a short history named "Bad Rubber" who is a furry parody of Blade Runner.
  • Author Existence Failure: Or more precisely, Author's Wife Existence Failure since the author cancelled the comic for good after his wife died of cancer. However, since joining FurAffinity recently, he's been so flattered by the effusive praise he's gotten that he's giving the idea of reviving the series some thought. Many fans are also afraid this could happen to him, as Gallacci is in his sixties, as fact he's fully aware and he's trying his best to continue the story on any way.
  • Breakthrough Hit: This comic was responsable to put Gallacci in the spotlight of the Furry Fandom in the 80s and most of the 90s.
  • Channel Hop: Of the publisher type: For many unexplained reasons, possibly related with Schedule Slip the author is well known, Albedo has being published by many companies on its three-decade run: First in Thoughts & Images (80s), later with Antarctic Press (later 80s until 1997), and finally with the defunct Shanda Fantasy Arts in the 2000s on only two single issues. Gallacci stated the revival of the story will be published on Radio Comix's website, along with Birthright, who was originally published by Fantagraphics in the 80s.
  • Creator Breakdown: Oh boy, where to begin: Besides the already mentioned death of Gallacci's wife and low sales, the author suffered one disgrace after another, including the deaths of many of his personal friends and other family members, the closure of Shanda Fantasy Arts and even the death of his pets, causing him have a serious case of depression for many years.
  • Fan Nickname: In a meta-example of this, Gallacci is nicknamed by his fans as "The American Shirow Masamune" partly because both authors have a knack for creating dystopic futuristic stories with lots of interesting background details and lots of beautiful girls.
  • Fountain of Expies: Due to the impact the comic had in the Furry Fandom, it's unsurprising to see expies in some works:
    • Possibly the most notorious expy is Katherine Fela/Alleycat from Extinctioners, who is basically a younger Erma with a proper tail and another mouse girl named Data looks a bit like Toki. It does help the author (Shawntae Howard) is a big fan of Albedo as well.
    • Leatrah Middlesmith from Katmandu is also an expy from both Erma and her mother Eda.
    • Even Gallacci himself has included expies in many of his works: The titular Zell from Zell Sworddancer is basically Erma as an human. His most recent work, the short story Alone Together has them for both main characters: Jerom is basically a gender-bended Toki mixed with Erma's father Kanoc and Danni is basically Erma as a rabbit, complete with a very similar background.
  • Inspiration Nod: According with Word of God, the whole saga received inspiration from literally hundred of sources, coming from Anime (Space Battleship Yamato, Astro Boy, Kimba the White Lion), literature (A Very British Coup, Watership Down), films (Blade Runner) and his own military experience in the USAF. The most notorious nod of this is regarding Space Battleship Yamatonote  since both series features battleship warfare and the use of a Wave Motion Gun as a super-weapon, except the Albedo version of it the same weapon is treated as an Artifact of Doom.
  • Keep Circulating the Tapes: Unlike its sequel, Birthright, the original was never re-issued, as of 2011.
  • Fanwork Ban: Gallacci is notorious for having a tight control over his property and banned any kind of fanart or fanfiction on the net. That ended backfiring against him later, especially after he cancelled the series, as only hardcore fans seems to remember the comic right now. There's a good reason, at least for him, for this standing: Gallacci disliked having to read lots of badly-written Star Trek fanfics, many of them full of thin-veiled excuses for shoe-horning their authors' fantasies on them, something he doesn't want to happen on his own work. Not that stopped some people to try it anyways.
  • Name's the Same:
  • Sequel Gap: Well, not exactly sequel, but more accurately Story Arc Gap instead: The first arc was published intermentently from 1983 to 1992 and the second one from 1997 with a giant break until 2005 with only four issues: Two from Antarctic Press and the last two from Shanda Fantasy Arts. It doesn't include the SFA's side-stories published between the end of the AP's period and the beginning of the SFA's one in the 2000s.
  • Trolling Creator: Not as exaggerated as other examples, but Gallacci is notorious for outright trolling or confusing his fans by giving contradicting information regarding important future plot points of the story, being the most notorious one the fate of Erma's family after the ILR attack on their homeworld. When a fan asked him about that, his answer was basically they could be already dead, except they don't know that yet. How serious was Gallacci on that answer is still unknown at this date. And let's not talk about the Bizarro Episode mentioned below...
  • What Could Have Been:
    • In the case you didn't get the rant the author does in the first issue of the Shanda Fantasy Arts version of the comic at the end of it in 2004, here's the whole story: SFA originally planned to write a crossover between Albedo with Katmandu, one of their main franchises, who was also planned as an "ending" of sorts for Albedo, without Steven Gallacci's permission. That crossover planned to do the following: Solving all the remaining loose ties regarding with the Creators, giving Tavas Ikalik the punishment he deserved for letting the ILR bomb Erma's homeworld and killing her boyfriend, giving Erma another lover, who was an human being and creating another, unrelated enemy, named the Zorion Empire, an empire made of human cyborgs who are using the technology from the Creators from the past, who are trying to conquest both the ILR, Enchawah, EDF and the Katmandu's home planet. Needless to say, Gallacci was pissed off of this, since the whole idea clashed with many aspect of the established canon, but rather than sue them, he decided to continuing to comic after a long hiatus, and included a short rant comic as a big Take That against SFA and also against anybody who tries to mess with the canon of the comic by other means.
    • Regarding Birthright, originally Gallacci planned to finish the story in a Kill 'em All situation at the end of the first arc of the story, but he changed his mind.
    • Also, according with an interview he did in the 80s and also in the prototype issue, Gallacci planned to include Mobile Suit-like giant robots, but decided no to include them due to being too unrealistic for the setting. Oddly enough, the prototype mecha looked like a furry-shaped version of the original RX-78-2 Gundam.
    • Gallacci was toying with the idea of an animated adaptation for years, but he changed his mind, partly because he wanted to avoid Adaptation Decay and also because he wanted to retain creative control. He did even suggested the voice cast: Gallacci suggested Patrick Stewart as the voice of Itzak Arratnote  and for the titular heroine, his suggested voice actress was Claudia Christian (aka Susan Ivanova).
    • Dr. Elaki Kalahahaii was planned to have a bigger role in the following planned issue, if Gallacci's wife hadn't died and forced him to put the story on hiatus: after very possibly the EDF failed to kill her with a bomb in her lab, they planned to send assassins to get ride of her for good, except she fights back by killing one of them with a literal boot to the head while being naked. By Word of God, that scene possibly will not going to be included in the revival, because it was possibly very out of character for her.
  • Word of God: Oh boy, if you though Masaki Kajishima, the creator of Tenchi Muyo!, was bad on this, Gallacci managed to outdo him: Basically, all the information regarding how the Albedo universe works, outside of what is already published in the comic on-story, normally can be found from the following sources:
    • From the liner notes that came at the beginning and at the end of the comic.
    • From the Refractions anthology, a trilogy of hard-to-find magazines, which includes lots of information about the story of the setting, about the Creators, and some info about Erma's childhood.
    • From Usernet newsgroups previous to the existence of the WWW in the 80s.
    • From both Gallacci's DeviantArt and FurAffinity's personal pages.
    • From side-stories published in other anthologies besides Albedo.
    • From very obscure interviews Gallacci did in the past in many magazines and websites.
    • From info Gallacci himself gave in conventions. One very obscure but important trivia he mentioned in a con regarding one of the characters not mentioned anywhere (In this case, it involves Col. Onni Hitzok) is the fact he's already married, and Dea, his actual girlfriend, is his concubine.
  • Write What You Know: By Word of God's admission, most of the characters and some of their respective personalities are based in both real people and even pets.note  Also, most of his trademark way to explain most of the technology used in the setting, use of military lingo and other details came from Gallacci's own experience in the USAF, from the fact he hails from a family of mechanics and also being a repentless Nerd as well.
  • Writing by the Seat of Your Pants: In a recent FAQ in his FurAffinity's page, Gallacci admitted most of the plot was written this way, albeit he already had a vague outline about how the story will develop.