Wall Run

http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/rsz_1rsz_quicksilver_wall_running.jpg

If you want to climb over a building but cannot fly, you could try several options. If you are a good climber, or a bug, you could Wall Crawl up it. If you are agile enough, you could Wall Jump from wall to wall to slowly but eventually get to the top.

But in this trope, they just run up it! They either have the superhuman strength or speed or ability to simply run up a smooth, flat, vertical surface at high speeds, even if logically they shouldn't be able to.


Examples:

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    Anime & Manga 
  • In Rookie Policewoman Kiruko-san, Kiruko is able to do this.
  • Kill la Kill's Kiryuin Satsuki can not only run, but walk briskly up a wall while kicking ass.
  • Near the end of RE: Cutey Honey, Honey displays this ability by running down a vertical wall with Natsuko in her arms after the latter resuscitates her. "These boots can run anywhere!"
  • In Magical Girl Lyrical Nanoha StrikerS, Subaru's Device allows her to rollerblade on walls by activating the Absorb Grip spell.
  • Ranma : Ranma can run up vertical things like powerline poles or horizontally on walls.
  • In K: Missing Kings, Kuroh and Yukari have a sword fight on the outside of a skyscraper like this. Kuroh appears to fall at first, but Yukari just uses his powers to stand on the side of the building, and Kuroh does the same after a moment.

    Comic Books 
  • The Flash can run fast enough to run up vertical surfaces.
  • Spider-Man can do short bursts of wall-running while webswinging.

    Films — Animation 
  • Astro Boy (2009): Astro sprints up a skyscraper while trying to avoid capture, using momentum from his flight.

    Films — Live-Action 
  • The Matrix:
    • In the opening sequence in The Matrix, Trinity evades a cop as he's shooting at her by running up and then along a wall of the room they're in before taking the fight to him. She also does this during the Government Lobby shootout later on in the film. Since this happens inside the Matrix, both instances are justified as Trinity being a redpill.
    • The third movie, The Matrix Revolutions, tops this with the Club Hel fight scene, with Mooks doing Combat Parkour on the ceiling, upside down (justified as them being A.I. programs living in the Matrix, so The Computer Is a Cheating Bastard is in effect here). And it is utterly fucking awesome. Said scene also has Trinity repeating her aforementioned maneuver to get the drop on her target.
  • In the first scene of The One, Jet Li's evil character Yulaw ends up doing a short version of this while dodging bullets. It helps that he has superhuman strength, speed, and agility.
  • In X-Men: Days of Future Past, Quicksilver runs along the wall of the White House's kitchen at one point during the "rescue" of Magneto.

    Live-Action TV 
  • The Flash:
    • As in the comics, the 2014 version of The Flash has Barry do that in "Plastique" to rescue a man falling from a maintenance gondola. Bonus points for asking Cisco how fast he needs to run for this to work. Being in a bar, Cisco does his calculations on a napkin (while being drunk) with Barry even providing the height in meters for easier calculations (both are scientists, so using the SI system should come naturally to them). However, Caitlin just tells him to move very fast before Cisco can finish his calculations (despite the fact that this is Cisco's area of expertise) and maintain the speed on the way down to avoid the "splat". It works, and Barry even outruns the falling gondola on the way down. In later episodes, he does this almost casually.
    • In the season 1 finale, he's running up a collapsing skyscraper, while dodging falling debris. At one point, he jumps over a piece of debris and lands back on the skyscraper, despite the fact that gravity should have pulled him down, not sideways.
    • In the Supergirl (2015) crossover episode, he does this during his initial appearance and rescues Kara, who's unconscious and falling out of a skyscraper window before zooming away into the countryside. It's not clear how he knew that she needed saving (to be fair, she would've been just fine even if she hit the ground at terminal velocity), as he has just appeared in this world moments before.

    Tabletop Games 
  • Dungeons & Dragons:
    • The 3.5th edition Expanded Psionic Handbook has a psionic feat which pretty much allows to treat walls as any flat surface: "Up the Wall". If you can't reach an horizontal surface at the end of your movement, though, you fall flat on your back.
    • The skill trick "Walk the Walls" and the Monk alternate class feature "Wall Walker" are more limited in distance, and only allow moving up or down.
  • In the Warhammer Gaiden Game Mordheim, a model usually has to make an Initiative Test in order to climb a wall and can cover up to their maximum movement distance vertically. The unique Skaven skill Wall Runner however allows a model to climb a wall without the need of a test, while the general Speed skill Scale Sheer Surfaces allows a model to climb up to double their movement distance using this trope without making a test.

    Video Games 
  • In The Incredible Hulk: Ultimate Destruction, Hulk's leg muscles are strong enough to allow him to run up buildings and mountains.
  • Mario can do this in Super Mario World if he runs at a purple incline block first.
  • Ever since the Sands of Time series, this has been a staple of the Prince of Persia games, both vertically and horizontally. It's accomplished via Le Parkour, so it's less extreme than most examples, but it's still beyond human capabilities.
  • Everyone in Dissidia: Final Fantasy can do this.
  • Sonic the Hedgehog:
    • Sonic himself, and pretty much every other character as well, can run on walls in any direction indefinitely, provided they keep going fast enough. At least, that's the theory... And provided the floor leading up to the wall is a ramp of increasing incline. Fortunately, in Sonic's world it frequently is. Sonic is capable of doing this when there is water falling down the wall.
    • Sonic CD's Palmtree Panic stage features pseudo-3D wall runs as its main gimmick.
    • In Sonic the Hedgehog (2006), in a section of the destroyed future's volcano (Magma Core), there is a wall dash section that leads to a ceiling area you can run across. If you stop during the ceiling section, you'll find that it is rather tricky to get off of it.
    • 3D Sonic games have included designated jump points — portions of background Sonic can latch onto via momentum, then jump off to the next. In Sonic Adventure these places were specially marked; while most of them are obvious in Sonic 2006 because of level architecture cues, some of them end up being total surprises.
  • [PROTOTYPE]: Alex Mercer can do it as well. While simply running up or along walls is pretty good, stopping will make him fall... unless the "use" key is pressed while facing the wall which makes him latch on and climb, Spider-Man-style. He can't traverse ceilings, though.

    Web Comics 

    Western Animation 
  • Code Lyoko: On Lyoko, Ulrich sometimes also run up vertical surfaces with his Super Sprint.
  • Steven Universe: While trying to avoid the heroes, Peridot jogs up a vertical surface. Like most Gem powers, it's revealed with surprisingly little fanfare — and it isn't even a successful getaway.
  • My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic: In the Superhero Episode "Power Ponies", Pinkie Pie as Fili-second can run on the side of buildings just as fast as on the ground.
  • In Ben 10, Ben regularly uses XLR8's Super Speed to do this and, as shown in "Lucky Girl", he's fast enough to avoid projectiles while wall running.
  • X-Men had Nightcrawler do this in his debut episode — which is odd because his talent (besides teleportation) is Wall Crawling.
  • Miraculous Ladybug: In the first episode, both Ladybug and Cat Noir do a fairly long run on the walls of Parisian buildings. Their powersets clearly involve superhuman agility and defying gravity.

    Real Life 
  • Many birds are capable of doing this by flapping their wings to increase traction as they run, even while they are too young to fly. It has been suggested that this behavior was also present in other feathered dinosaurs.
  • You can perform a literal wall run in a space station, since there's no gravity in the outer space, calling a surface a wall would be redundant. The only question is how you keep your feet on the wall...
  • As with motorcyles on the "Wall of Death", centrifugal force trumps gravity, providing the vehicle is travelling fast enough. A human being capable of running as fast as a motorbike might pull this feat off... so not impossible for Superman?

Alternative Title(s): Wall Running

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/WallRun