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Suddenly Blonde
So This Game Is Totally Awesome comes out on your NES. And it lives up to its name. You laughed. You cried. You cheered. You fight the legions of hell and rescue the Damsel in Distress, a cute-looking brunette. And you can't wait for the sequel.

Four years later, it finally arrives - Super This Game Is Totally Awesome is released. And it's even better. The Technobabble is more babbley, the Slippy-Slidey Ice World is more slippery, the Player Punches are more punchy, and the Damsel in Distress is... blonde? They Changed It, Now It Sucks, right?

Wrong. She was always supposed to be blonde. However, the NES couldn't render blonde hair very well (it was hard to distinguish from skin tone, and they could only have three colors per sprite, making yellow "less useful"), so most artists switched to brown. Likewise, it usually very difficult to render black hair, because black was generally reserved as the background color. note  This also explains why familiar characters in some older games are drawn in their usual colors in cutscenes only.

As consoles became more advanced, some franchise characters kept their quirks as a legacy feature. However, most artists opted to revert to the original concept art. As a result, these characters became Suddenly Blonde. This trope refers to any example of a technical limitation that requires a character in-game to differ from their concept art, which is reverted when that limitation is removed. It doesn't just refer to hair color.

For a more general version, see Adaptation Dye-Job.

Examples:

  • Nearly any character with "Princess" in front of her name got reverted to blond hair and a pink dress when those colors became available. Peach and Zelda are the most notable examples, although Zelda was portrayed as brunette in Twilight Princess and Super Smash Bros. Brawl.
    • Zelda was originally given brown hair and blue eyes, and then red hair before becoming blonde.
    • Peach was originally a redhead as a sprite, but the artists gave her either brown or blonde hair in official art (she's always been blonde in Japan though; her design has changed very little since the first game). Peach's eyes are also affected by the trope. She was always supposed to have large eyes like the other characters in the Mario series, but her eyes looked tiny in comparison once she was in 3D. It wasn't until the Gamecube (or late in the N64's life span) that Peach's eyes matched her original design.
    • Link himself suffered from this trope in The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past, which is funny since his last two NES games had him with brown hair, which matched the concept art of him. The concept art of Link in Link to the Past still had him with brown/dirty blond hair, but the in-game sprite of Link has him with pink hair, which is most likely due to palette limitations for the SNES. The GBA port of the game still retained Link's pink hair. All Zelda games after this one kept Link with blonde hair afterward (although Twilight Princess dirties it up a bit).
  • Mario and Luigi used to be identical except in color. Nowadays, although the exact measurements change from game to game, Luigi is universally the taller brother.
  • Continuing with Nintendo, Pauline of Donkey Kong was a blonde in cabinet art but a redhead in the actual game. She became a brunette in Donkey Kong '94.
  • Metroid's Samus Aran took a few games to become fully blond — in Metroid 1 she was a brunette (green with the Varia Suit), Metroid II: Return of Samus was in black and white, and in Super Metroid she had a sort of dishwater blond color.
  • Old DOS games that were rendered in EGA color had only 16 colors, so most games made in that era used white, red or gray for skin tone. When VGA came out, most new games (with one exception — see below) took advantage of the new, nigh-unlimited color palette to reinvent the characters of the series. Games which provide examples of this include Duke Nukem, Space Quest, Leisure Suit Larry and King's Quest. The most prominent example is Space Quest, where Roger goes from a dull brown hair color in his first three games to blond once he hits VGA.
  • Terra from Final Fantasy VI is blonde, but the team was running out of palette space, and the rest of her design worked better if she reused an existing palette. Her palette didn't have enough shades of yellow to create believable blonde hair, but they did manage to make believable greenish-blue hair, which is what most fans remember; however, in all of her other appearances (including the official artwork for Final Fantasy VI), she has blonde hair.
    • It's worth noting that there's a palette nearby the one used for Terra in-game that gives her blonde hair and produces no notable palette issues. Make of that what you will.
  • Four of the five playable characters in Final Fantasy V have different hair colors and three of them have radically different hair styles between their official artwork and their in-game sprites. Bartz has light blond/white hair in his artwork, but his sprite has brown hair. Lenna has blonde hair worn in a Prim and Proper Bun in her artwork, but her sprite has bright pink hair worn down somewhere between chin and shoulder length. Faris has blonde hair worn in a low ponytail in her artwork, but her sprite has purple hair worn in a wild style. Galuf has white hair and is nearly bald with a short mustache in his artwork, but his sprite has a full head and a full beard of brown hair. Krile is the only playable character whose hair in her artwork and sprite match in both color and style, with blonde hair worn in a high ponytail in both. Many fans were in for a shock when portraits were added for the Game Boy Advance and iOS rereleases.
  • The qunari from the Dragon Age universe were originally supposed to have horns, but because they had issues making the helmets work over horned characters, that was dropped in the first game. The second game has given them horns, as well as an entirely new, unique look. The helmet issues wasn't really present anymore since all qunari with a few exceptions looked exactly the same. To their credit, Bioware has explained why the qunari characters in the first game don't have horns. Sten was a special case who was born without horns, while all others removed their horns to show their social status.
  • The elves in Dragon Age: Origins looked like short, lithe humans with pointy ears. In Dragon Age II, they have also received some more distinguishing facial features, like large eyes, a flat transition from forehead to nose, and a cultural preference for bare feet.
  • Happens all the time in World of Warcraft. The best-known example is Dark Lady Sylvanas, leader of the Forsaken Undead and a High Elf. But since High/Blood Elves weren't in the game until the first expansion, she had a Night Elf's model instead, which looked nothing like her appearance in Warcraft 3. It wasn't until the second expansion that she was not only made a proper High Elf, but became one of the few humanoid characters in the game whose model was actually unique.
  • In Star Ocean: The Second Story, this is presumably why one of Ashton's dragons is pink in-game instead of the blue it's depicted to be in his status page portrait and the official artwork. It's made even more noticeable by the fact that when Precis has Bobot imitate his appearance with her Super Holograph killer move, the mecha dragons produced are properly colored red and blue.
  • The 1987 Famicom Star Wars game gave Luke Skywalker black hair except in cutscenes, due to palette limitations.
  • In Antarctic Adventure and Penguin Adventure, Pentarou's skin was jet-black, but became blue in later games. He was already blue on some box covers, and even other games on the MSX had to color him blue so that he could be visible against black backgrounds.
  • Lunar: The Silver Star for Sega CD had both graphics and color limitations to work around, so Luna's sprite had green hair, Ramus' had blue, and... something happened to Jessica, who's almost unrecognizable; but they're depicted more “normally” in cutscenes and in their dialogue portraits. Despite the graphical leap presented by the PlayStation version, Ramus' sprites still kept the blue hair for some reason.
  • In Batman for the NES, the cutscenes show a black-garbed Batman (as in the film), but the actual sprite during gameplay is a blue and purple Batsuit (largely for convenience's sake, since NES palettes usually reserved black as a background color).

Notable aversions ("legacy features")

  • The brothers Mario had appearances designed to be easy to render on the NES — the caps were to avoid having visible hair, the overalls were to make the arms more distinct, and the mustaches were to make the lack of any visible mouths less noticeable. This also had the side effect of making the characters look distinct during an era where almost every video game hero was either a cute ball-like monster or a Japanese boy with blue, spiky hair.
  • In Metroid II: Return of Samus, since they didn't have color available, the artists put large, noticeable shoulder pads on the Varia Suit to make the difference obvious. The Varia suit is now dark orange (with Samus' regular suit being yellow), but the shoulder pads have remained, and actually became notably bigger in Metroid Prime.
  • As mentioned above, EGA games tended to use white or red for skin tone, and Commander Keen was no exception. However, while the last few games used VGA color, which had no such limitations, Keen still retained completely white skin. It's especially noticeable when a giant drawing of him is shown on the title screen of the fourth and fifth games (the "Goodbye, Galaxy!" arc).

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