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Revolving Door Revolution
"France changes its government so often, it might as well install revolving doors in the Palace of Versailles."
— Old joke

Sometimes a nation undergoes a major revolution, and completely changes its style of government. Sometimes people lose faith in the new style of government, and have another revolution soon after. Sometimes this happens over and over and over again, and that's the Revolving Door Revolution.

The reasons for this can be complex. Maybe the nation in question is extremely polarized in popular opinion? Maybe the successive governments aren't stable, or effective enough to last? Maybe the writers just think it makes for better drama (or better laughs, depending)?

These sorts of turnovers are particularly common in your stereotypical Banana Republic.

See also Full-Circle Revolution, where the new government is run by different people but policy-wise winds up being no different than the old. In a Revolving Door Revolution situation, successive governments may well be polar opposites.

Examples:

    open/close all folders 

    Comicbooks 
  • The French comic Benoit Brisefer features a Banana Republic with three quarreling generals, each of which is so spectacularly inept they can't stay in power for more than a week. The inhabitants have grown so used to it they barely pay attention to who's in charge at the moment, charging extra for food that doesn't have bullet holes in it.
  • In Tintin, General Tapioca and General Alcazar take turns deposing each other as dictator of San Theodoros (another Banana Republic). The government changes hands at least five times over the course of the series.

    Fan Fics 
  • In Equestria: A History Revealed, the Griffon's homeland is said to fit this trope well, much to the LemonyNarrator's chagrin. Their Kingdom was overthrown by a Republic, which was then transformed into an Empire, and was overthrown itself. The leadership keeps changing so much that the Lemony Narrator just gives up and ceases further discussion on the topic.

    Film 

    Literature 
  • In It Can't Happen Here, Buzz Windrip is elected president and quickly institutes a fascist regime in America. Several years later, his right-hand man Lee Saranson forces him into exile and seizes power. Saranson is later assassinated by Haik, who seizes power for himself. None of the coups result in any real changes for the American people.
  • In the Chaos Timeline by Max Sinister, "Chaos" is the name given to the mess of failed states that cover much of the globe, where governments change every few months and borders every few years, so nobody tries to keep track of it all.
  • William Butler Yeats' poem "The Great Day": "Hurrah for revolution and more cannon shot!/A beggar on horseback lashes a beggar on foot./Hurrah for revolution, and cannon come again!/The beggars have changed places, but the lash goes on."
  • Growing up in a tumultuous era of Ahnk-Morpork's history, Sam Vimes has this opinion of revolution. As he says in Night Watch;
    Sam: Don't put your trust in revolutions. People die and nothing changes; that's why they're called revolutions. They always come round again.

    Tabletop Games 
  • The Border Kingdoms region in the Forgotten Realms setting is composed of a slew of small baronies ruled by powerful adventurers, each seeking to carve out a scrap of land and rule it as they see fit. Then another adventurer comes along, bumps them off, and sets himself up as the new baron, et cetera. A fluff piece titled "Master Tactician" has a cleric of the Red Knightnote  working on conquering the baronies to stabilize the region, but we never find out if she succeeded.
  • In the board game Junta, set in The Most Serene Republic of Los Bananas, it's rare to see a turn go by without someone trying to assassinate El Presidente, overthrow him in a military coup, or both. Of course, when the next Presidente is elected or appointed, the cycle of revolving-door presidents continues.
  • In Pathfinder, the country of Galt is an obvious analogue for France—specifically France during the Reign of Terror, which it has been undergoing for 40+ years now, with no signs of stopping. During that time, it has seen over a dozen different governments, each new revolutionary council guillotining their predecessors, only to be overthrown themselves within five years.

    Video Games 
  • The flying city of Columbia in Bioshock Infinite. It was founded by the United States in 1893, but eventually seceded from the Union in 1901. After the Secession, it became a Theocratic Dictatorship under Father Comstock. Then in 1912 the Anarcho-Communist Vox Populi launch a bloody revolution, and In one possible future Elizabeth, after being brainwashed by Comstock takes over and founds an even worse Theocratic Dictatorship that by 1983 leads Columbia to attack New York City.
  • Sometimes in Crusader Kings II, you get a situation where there's multiple strong claimants to the throne of a kingdom and no single faction is strong enough to reliably hold the kingdom; this problem is compounded by the fact that new rulers face an opinion penalty from vassals that decreases over time, but is very large at the start. Accordingly, there's often a merry-go-round where factions rise up and depose the old king, only for the new king to face another revolution. The cycle continues until either one king is finally strong enough to hold things together, or the kingdom splinters under the strain.
  • The Romulans went through several governments in a span of thirty years in the backstory of Star Trek Online. Power struggles went on throughout the 2380s in the wake of Shinzon's brief tenure as Praetor, with the Empire breaking in two at one point. Then Praetor Chulan was murdered by Nero right after the Hobus supernova and a couple years of no government at all followed. Admiral Taris eventually came out on top and became Praetor, but got embroiled in a power struggle with the Senate and the military and was eventually forced out in a Military Coup that installed Sela as Praetor. Sela then crowned herself Empress and announced that the Senate would now serve at her pleasure. And then she got kidnapped by the Iconians in "Cutting the Cord", plunging the Empire into chaos again. Word of God said that as of the Delta Rising expansion, there's almost nothing left of what was formerly one of the three great powers of the Star Trek franchise. Meanwhile a mix of refugees, Reman rebels, Spock's Unificationist followers, and disaffected Imperials formed a democratic successor state, the Romulan Republic, which serves as the Romulan player faction.

    Webcomics 
  • In The Order of the Stick, the Western Continent's empires rarely last a year, constantly getting overthrown by someone who sets up their own empire. Subverted in that Tarquin's organization is secretly in control of most of the empires.

     Web Original 

    Western Animation 
  • In an episode of The Simpsons, the Simpsons visit a fictitious African country. The country is renamed twice during their journey there, and by the time they leave, their former African guide has become president, and the former president is serving their drinks on the plane home.

    Real Life 
  • The Byzantine Empire, where dynasties could last as much as two or three, or even one, emperors before being overthrown.
  • For about 100 years from 1789, to 1870, the French under went repeated revolutions and counter revolutions as Republicans and Monarchists (divided into three factions, each supporting a different dynasty, and a different style of monarchy) battled for control of the government. First came the Ancien Regime, then the First Republic (including the Reign of Terror, the Directorate and the Consulate as distinct phases inaugured through violent means), then the First Empire under Napoleon (1804-1814), then the First Bourbon Restoration, (1814-1815) then the 100 days, (1815) then the Second Bourbon Restoration, (1815-1830) then the July Monarchy, (1830-1848) then the Second Republic, (1848-1852) then the Second Empire, (1853-1870) before finally settling on the Third Republic in 1870, which was the first relatively stable French democracy (still prone to short-lived, unstable government), lasting 70 years (longer then any other government in France since the first revolution) until 1940 when it was destroyed by the Nazis and replaced with the Vichy puppet regime. The Fourth Republic was established following WWII, then collapsed in 1958 as France lost control of its colonies.note  It was replaced by the Fifth Republic which has remained in power ever since.
  • Several of the tiny states that made up Germany in the 19th century had small scale examples of Revolving Door Revolution, most famously the Revolutions of 1848, most of which where crushed by the monarchist establishment. In the 19th century, the most powerful of those tiny states, Prussia, reunited all the German speaking states (with the exceptions of Austria, Switzerland, and Lichtenstein) into a new "German Empire" in 1871. In 1914, the German Empire fights in World War One. In 1918, the German Empire is overthrown by the Weimar Republic. Part of Germany is given to the new nation of Poland, cutting off East Prussia from the rest of Germany. In 1933 Hitler is appointed Chancellor of Germany, and proceeds to overthrow the democratic Wiemar Republic and conquer vast tracts of land. Losing World War II, Germany is again divided, this time into a Democratic West Germany, and a Communist East Germany. Following the collapse of Communism, the two Germanies reunite in 1990.
  • China has a long history of old dynasties falling and another taking control. In the early 20th century, China went from being an Empire under the Qing dynasty, to a Republic following the Xinhai Revolution of 1911, which fell into civil war between the Nationalist Party and the Communist Party in 1927, resulting in a period of regional "war lords". This was complicated further by the Japanese invassion and occupation in 1937 that was later merged into the larger Second World War. Following the war, the Communist party seized total control of the mainland, with Taiwan being the soul surviving outpost of the Nationalist party, thus giving rise to a rivalry between the two nations that lasts to this day.
  • Korea has a long history of being sometimes united, sometimes divided, sometimes independent, sometimes under foreign occupation. Due to it's location, it has, at various times, been under the influence of Japan, Russia, China, the Mongols, and the Manchurians. A "shrimp between rampaging whales" as one Korean historian put it. Between 1894 and 1895, China and Japan fought the first Sino-Japanese war over Korea. Ten years later between 1904 and 1905 Japan fought another war over Korea, this time with the Russian Empire. In 1910, Japan forced Korea to sign the Japan–Korea Annexation Treaty, which made Korea a part of the Japanese Empire. The Korean people then suffered under Japanese Occupation until the end of the Second World War, when it was split between the Communist North, and the Pro-Western South. Between 1950 and 1953 the North and South fought the Korean war, with the Americans and their allies intervening on behalf of the South, and with the Soviets, Chinese, and their allies intervening on behalf of the North. The peace that ended the war established a new border at the "DMZ", and formed an uneasy peace that has lasted more of less intact for 60 years. South Korea has had it's own cases of Revolving Door Revolution, with the First Republic lasting from 1948-1960, until President Syngman Rhee, who was becoming increasingly more corrupt and dictatorial was overthrown in the "April Revolution" of 1960. The Second Republic lasted from 1960-1961, until it was overthrown by a military Junta called the "Supreme Council for National Reconstruction" that held power from 1961-1963. This was followed by the Third Republic, which lasted from 1963-1972. In 1972 a new Constitution was adopted, creating the Fourth Republic, which lasted until the assassination of President Park Chung-hee. The so called "Fifth Republic" wasn't really a Republic at all, but another military dictatorship under the rule of Chun Doo-hwan from 1979-1987. The Sixth republic was put in place in 1987, and remains in place to this day.
  • From the way things are going Egypt is becoming this trope, after then-president Mubarak was kicked from power in 2011, Mohamed Morsi quickly won the seat of the presidency, within two years and with another wave of civil dissidence he was thrown out of office and arrested by a military coup.

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