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Clock Discrepancy
The time of an event doesn't happen at the time it was said. Usually the clock or watch is off. The event either happen early or later, but the characters don't notice until quite after the event. In mysteries, such a discrepancy can make or break an alibi.

Compare Magic Countdown. Contrast Right on the Tick.


Examples:

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     Anime and Manga  

  • In the very first mystery of The Kindaichi Case Files, Kindaichi manipulates a suspect's watch to get said suspect to reveal themselves. Many other mysteries are also solved when Kindaichi realizes that some sort of clock-based manipulation is in play.
  • Also happens occasionally in Case Closed; once, a police officer realized that his roommate was up to no good because he kept all of his clocks 5 minutes fast to make sure he was never late to work, but the roommate reset the clocks to read accurately as part of his plot to fudge with his alibi. (Fortunately, more substantial proof of guilt is also found.)

     Comic Books  

  • In an Archie comic, Big Eater Jughead is in class, and informs the teacher, Miss Grundy, that "his stomach" says its lunchtime. She reminds Jug that the clock on the wall reads 10 before noon. At that moment, the school janitor Mr. Svenson enters the classroom with a ladder. The purpose? To adjust the clock, which he said was running ten minutes slow.

     Film  

  • In The King's Speech, when Bertie comes to tell David that he is late for dinner, David reminds him that their father ordered all the clocks set fast and winds the hands back on a mantle clock by half an hour. According to royal biographers, this is Truth in Television.
  • In the film Gremlins, one of the rules for handling mogwai was to never NEVER feed them after midnight (as turns out, it turns them into gremlins). One night the mogwai in the box were making noises like they were hungry. The alarm clock says it's about 11:30, so the boy feeds them some leftover chicken. The next day, the boy notices the clock reading the exact same time. Seems the extension cord had been ripped from the plug, the mogwai actually chewed through the electrical cord, so it was after midnight after all.
  • Back to the Future
    • Marty is at Doc Brown's house, and thinks he will be on time for school, only to discover all his clocks are a half hour slow.
    • Doc Brown proves to Marty that the time machine works by syncronizing watches with a digital clock he attaches to his dog, then sending the dog one minute into the future. When the dog shows up again, his clock is a minute slower than Doc's.
  • In Like Flint: Cramden discovers the plot to replace the President with an Evil Twin when he times the President's golf swing and his watch says it took 3 minutes.
  • In Primer, Abe suspects that the Box is a time machine, and he confirms this by placing a digital watch inside it for a minute. Upon removing the watch, it's about 21 hours fast.
  • In the film Mindhunters, the heroine re-sets the clock so the villain will misjudge when he's due to strike again. This also played on the villain's obsession with precise timing. She knew that he would reset the clock to the correct time, which would cause the phosphorous powder she coated it with to get on his hands, allowing him to be exposed by a special light.

     Literature  

  • Around the World in Eighty Days: At first it looks like Phileas Fogg came a day late and lost the bet, but then he notices the date in the newspaper and realizes that, since they crossed the International Date Line, they had gained a day and still on time.
  • The book 1984 plays with this idea. The main character looks at the clock which reads 8:00. He thinks it's still 8 pm, but instead it was actually 8 am.
  • Happens in some Agatha Christie stories, notably Evil Under the Sun, where a watch worn by a witness is deliberately altered to give the murderer an alibi and allow him to stage a fake murder so that the victim appears to have been killed before she really was.
  • In Murder on the Orient Express, the broken watch also appears - and Poirot points out that the killer wants him to think that the murder happened at that time.
  • There's also an example revolving around the clocks going back in one of the Black Widowers mysteries, where a character is woken up by a phone call at a time that is actually an hour later than he thinks it is (because he hasn't yet set his clock forward for Daylight Savings Time) and thus unwittingly provides a false alibi.
    • In another Black Widowers story, a discrepancy between "ten minutes before six" (which would exonerate the accused) and "half past five" (which incriminates him) is resolved in favor of the former — the witness reporting the latter was an accountant used to decimal numbers who unconsciously interpreted the digital clock display "5:50" as "five and a half".
  • The Lord Peter Wimsey novel Have His Carcase has a discrepancy that's based on medical evidence rather than timepieces. Harriet finds the body of the victim with still-liquid blood pooled around it; then the body is washed out to sea before it can be autopsied. Peter and Harriet spend most of the book assuming the murder happened almost immediately before she found the body, because the blood didn't have time to clot; in actuality, the victim was a hemophiliac and the murder happened several hours earlier.
    • Meanwhile, Harriet is working on a novel where someone has to set a clock to support an alibi. And finding it frustrating.
  • A vital part of the solution to John Dickson Carr's The Hollow Man. The reported time of the second murder is so far off that it took place before the first murder, and the victim of the first murder was the killer.

     Live Action Tv  

  • In the Ellery Queen TV series episode "The Adventure of the Hard-Hearted Huckster", an important clue is that the victim always had his watch set 5 minutes fast, and his secretary did too because her boss did it.
  • M*A*S*H: A soldier who they're trying to keep alive through December 25th so his kids don't have to remember Christmas as "the day Daddy died" dies at about 11:35pm. Hawkeye moves the hands of the clock so that it's 12:10am, saying "Hey look he made it." They falsfy the death certificate.
  • Reno 911!: A psychic tells Jones that he'll lose one of his testicles by midnight. He spends to episode worrying about it, and he's relieved when a clock shows that it's past midnight. Then someone mentions that clock is a little fast; cue testicle injury.
  • In the pilot episode of The X-Files Mulder & Scully get affected by a few minutes of Missing Time - there's a big bright light, and then the next thing they know it's 9 minutes later. Mulder marks the spot where it happened. Nothing comes of it at the time except to demonstrate Mulder's belief in the extranatural; but then in an episode years later it happens again and it turns out they're at the exact same spot.
  • This has cropped up in a few episodes of Jonathan Creek as part of the solution to the mystery, most notably in "Miracle in Crooked Lane" whereby a ill woman was convinced that morning was evening, in order to provide a alibi for a murder.
  • In an episode of Soap, Mary sets the alarm clock forward a half hour so she and Burt can have time to talk before he goes to work. When she tells him about it he tries to go back to bed for another half hour of sleep.
  • In Ghostwriter, one of the main characters is accused of burning a one-man run electronic store. His friends were able to prove him innocent when they discover that the store's display clock was running one hour slow, meaning he has an alibi for the actual time of the crime. The store owner, however, doesn't, and he ends up being the real culprit, as he was trying to destroy evidence of a mass videotape duplication system.
  • Done in a episode of Newsradio when Jimmy decides to sell the station. He's supposed to contact the buyer at midnight to finalize the deal. The staff spends most of the night trying to convince him not to sell. Five minutes before midnight, Matthew reveals he had set the clock back ten minutes and it was actually five minutes after and Jimmy has missed his deadline. Of course since This Is Reality, midnight was just a loose guideline and Jimmy can still go through with the deal.
    Jimmy: I'm dealing with a corporation here, not magical fairies.
  • On Criminal Minds, the profilers trick a captured terrorist into revealing his co-conspirators' target by manipulating his sense of time, then letting him think the planned attack had already taken place. It wasn't done with a physical clock, it was done by telling him when it was time to pray and altering the time slightly at each point. Gideon even pointed out that using an actual clock would have probably failed as it would have been more obvious.
  • On Monk, in the episode Mr. Monk and the Rapper, a rapper named Murderuss is suspected of killing his rival rapper Extra Large with a time bomb in the exact same matter as he described in his song "Time Bomb". However, it turns out that Murderuss is innocent and that Extra Large was not the intended target - when setting the timer, the murderer didn't account for the fact that Daylight Savings Time started that day and so the bomb went off an hour later than it was supposed to.
    • Also in Mr. Monk Takes Manhattan Disher buys a watch from a street-corner salesman in New York City who claims it is accurate. However, this is shown not to be the case when Disher remarks on its ability to show times all around the world and says "it's 5:30 here; in Denver, 3:30; in California, 12:17; and in Paris, France... time has stopped." The troubles with the watch prove to be critical because it sets off an alarm at a crucial time. The characters almost get caught because the instructions are only written in Korean and so they can't figure out how to turn the sound off.
  • In The Prisoner episode "The Chimes of Big Ben", Number Six realizes that his "escape" was a fake because Big Ben is indicating the same time as a watch he supposedly obtained in Poland — which should be one hour ahead of London time.
  • A non-criminal example in Sherlock, where the titular character figures out that a "friend" of his from his university days has crossed the International Date Line twice by the fact that his watch is two days late.

     Video Games  

  • Shows up as a common contradiction in the Ace Attorney series. In fact, it shows up in the first case of Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney, when witness Frank Sahwit claims the time of the murder was at 1:00 when it was actually 4:00. Given that he's the real killer, the discrepancy is because the murder weapon was a talking clock that was off by several hours at the time of the murder.

     Western Animation  

  • American Dad!. "The American Dad After School Special": Stan puts an Exploding Collar on his son, set to go off if he doesn't ask a girl out in 24 minutes. As he's running down the street, he remarks that his Timex watch shows he still has 5 minutes left, then immediately sees a newspaper with the headline "Timex Recalls Watches For Being Four Minutes Slow."
    • In an early episode, Stan accidentally exposes the whole family to a deadly virus, and they are diagnosed with 24 hours to live. They decide to make the most of their time by watching the complete first season of 24. When the time is finally up, they say their goodbyes and wait for the clock to strike the new hour, as if expecting to just drop dead without question. The clock rings, but Roger tells them that clock is always a little fast. Better give it another minute. The virus was inert, so they weren't in any real danger in the first place.
  • In the Johnny Bravo cartoon "Bearly Enough Time", a clock being even a millisecond off was Chronos the Bear's Berserk Button.
  • In an episode of Danny Phantom, the titular character tricks the Big Bad into thinking he still has 10 minutes left of powerlessness left by turning Vlad's clock back. This allows him to gain the element of surprise and win the fight.
  • On The Simpsons Homer gets painted as a molester by an unscrupulous TV show clumsily editing an interview; the clock behind him jumps back & forth as he speaks.
  • The first season finale of The Raccoons, "Gold Rush", plays with this trope. Cyril Sneer is planning to shut down the Raccoons' crusading newspaper, The Evergreen Standard, with the help of Mr. Knox. Cyril's plan involved cutting off the supply of ink and paper to the Standard and forcing it out of business. For his plan to work, the deal had to be finalized under a deadline. However, Cyril is contacted by Mr. Knox that the deal is off because he missed the deadline - which saves the newspaper. Cyril is clearly confused as his clock indicates he had time to spare before the deadline. His son Cedric Sneer reminds him that years ago, the clocks were intentionally set back earlier so that he could get more work out of his employees!
  • In Storm Hawks, episode "Five Days", when Aerrow breaks nearly every bone in his body and has to remain motionless for five days for a repair crystal to heal him, he starts noticing some small minor problems with the ship, including a clock running three ticks too slow. Then Master Cyclonis attacks their ship to take back the repair crystal (that Piper stole). She looks at the clock thinking the crystal needs ten more minutes to completely heal him so she removes the crystal from Aerrow's cast. Just when she's about to finish him off, Aerrow points out that the clock was slow and that he was healed two minutes ago and fights back.
    Aerrow: Those ticks add up.


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