Absurdly Powerful School Jurisdiction

You are a student at your local school. Once school lets out for the day and you're miles away from the school property, you get involved in a "misunderstanding". Perhaps you can partake in a Zany Scheme, you join some of the guys in spying on women changing their clothes, or you have to fight The Bully.

When you return to school, you're shocked to learn that you're being punished for those offenses you committed — off school grounds and outside of school hours.

Truth in Television due to various laws as well as some schools wanting to protect their reputations (bonus points if they are a Boarding School or a private school).

May overlap with Jurisdiction Friction. If student(s) are punished for the actions of a family member or an acquaintance, it could also overlap with I Will Punish Your Friend for Your Failure or Revenge by Proxy.

Examples:

Anime and Manga
  • Wedding Peach: In the anime, a Sadist Teacher named Iwamoto (actually a devil in disguise) comes to power in the heroines' school and sets up strict rules. Not only is student behavior controlled inside school but outside school as well. In fact, he even follows Momoko, Yuri, Hinagiku and their male friends to a ski resort to enforce his edict about boys and girls not meeting or talking with each other.
  • Bleach: In episode 10 Ichigo and Rukia are grabbed by security when they tried to interfere with one of Don Kanonji's public exorcisms off campus. In episode 11 it's revealed that their actions were captured on film and they and the other students who were there are called before the school administration for possible disciplinary action.

Film
  • In the movie Elvira, Mistress of the Dark, a school faculty makes the decision to expel any student caught associating with Elvira.
  • Convinced that rock and roll and especially the Ramones are the source of truancy and hooliganism, Principal Togar of Rock 'n' Roll High School tries to ban student attendance at their concert.
  • The 2008 Lifetime movie Fab Five: The Texas Cheerleader Scandal has the titular cheerleaders heading into an adult boutique and novelty store where they take photos of themselves messing around and trying out the merchandise inside. They end up posting these pictures on MySpace later; and get punished with a school suspension. Justified because these cheerleaders are in uniform during their escapade and are therefore representing, er, misrepresenting the school.
  • In Revenge of the Nerds the municipal police have zero authority on Adams College campus. It's implied the school is so powerful that the local police leaves it completely alone.
  • Ferris Bueller's Day Off: Principal Rooney scours the city looking for Ferris Bueller to punish him, despite the fact that (in this case) he does have an excused absence according to his parents, thus meaning there should be nothing Rooney can do.

Literature
  • Used in all the stories by Charles Hamilton under his various pen names (eg Frank Richards, Hilda Richards, Martin Clifford and others) because all of his main characters are boarding school students, the most famous being Billy Bunter.

Live-Action TV
  • Subverted in the Blue Bloods episode "Devil's Breath". At first Erin's daughter Nicky tries to organize a sit-in to protest her school's policy of being able to search lockers at any time regardless of the student's consent. At the end of the episode she changes it to a mass protest after school hours and across the street. The principal threatens to suspend the whole group but Erin forces her to back down by pointing out that such a protest is, in fact, protected under the First Amendment.

Western Animation
  • On the "Bart's Girlfriend" episode of The Simpsons, Bart uses a balloon to pull up Groundskeeper Willie's kilt during a "Scotchtoberfest" event and immediately gets busted by Principal Skinner who was using the phony "Scotchoberfest" as a sting operation to entrap Bart. Skinner does this even though the sting operation clearly takes place off school grounds and on a Sunday.
  • An episode of Fairly OddParents features Truant Officer Shallow Grave chasing down Timmy and an aged down Adam West, despite the fact Adam is normally an adult and thus wouldn't have been enrolled in Dimmsdale Elementary. Said truant officer is also a Psycho for Hire Bounty Hunter who uses excessive force and has to be reminded he isn't allowed to do anything lethal to the kids. Ultimately justified because of Rule of Funny and Shallow Grave being fired at the end when Timmy stages it to look like he had been with an adult the whole time (which he technically was...just one that was in the form of a kid), implying there are at least some limitations of school jurisdiction.
  • A 1959 Walter Lantz cartoon "Truant Student" has a plot similar to the above Fairly Oddparents episode, played for the Rule of Funny. Starring a bear named Windy and his son Breezy, Windy gets mistaken for a student by the local truant officer. The overzealous officer pursues Windy throughout the short and even goes as far as punish the defiant bear by sticking him inside the school bell and then ringing it!

Real Life
  • In some US states and localities, "nexus" laws are in effect, allowing schools to punish students for any infractions going to or coming from school. For the purposes of certain crimes (like fighting or drug offenses), some state laws decree the jurisdiction of the school extends to within a certain radius (such as 1000 feet) of the school premises.
  • Many boarding schools as well as private and parochial schools often will punish students for behavior outside of school and not just for discipline reasons. Many of them have reputations to protect. Getting a bad reputation (through misbehavior of its students) could lead to parents pulling existing students from the school and prospective students reconsidering enrollment.
  • This trope isn't limited to primary and secondary schools. Some higher learning institutions are known to have considerable power. One example is Bob Jones University of South Carolina. Many hefty strings are attached to the lifestyles of students, such as dress codes and social behavior. In fact, the students are actually barred from listening to contemporary music or even going to movie theaters; this is actually specified in the campus code of conduct.
  • Pensacola Christian College has tougher regulations. In addition to many of the above listed rules, mixed-gender social interactions off-campus are not allowed without advance permission...and a chaperone! Their rules even apply when the students are at home or away on school break. Informants are used to identify and report student misbehavior.
  • Some schools have prohibited students from using social media or keeping blogs, even outside of school hours and on their home computers. The legality of such rules has been disputed.
  • Medieval universities in Europe during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries held considerable power over their students outside of the campus. For example, rectors in Bologna prohibited students from patronizing gambling establishments and moneylenders. Oxford banned students from keeping bears and falcons in their campus quarters and prohibited them from consorting with prostitutes.
  • In the nineteenth century, Princeton and Harvard administrators created a blacklist among the nation's colleges to prevent habitual troublemakers from enrolling elsewhere. A fair number of colleges in the USA did abide by this blacklist.
  • Many colleges in the USA through the nineteenth century up until the 1960s had in loco parentis powers over students, including what they could and couldn't do off-campus. While enforceable at isolated, rural colleges, this power over students was trickier to enforce at urban and commuter colleges, and there was a definite Double Standard; most of the rules for men were loosened if not eliminated after World War II with an influx of combat veterans well into their 20s attending under the GI Bill, while the ones governing "girls" continued until second-wave feminism led to their repeal in the mid/late '60s.
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