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Fridge: Ratchet & Clank
Fridge Brilliance
  • On Ratchet & Clank, it was pointed out to me that Clank was slower to pick up on some obvious things despite being very intellegent (mistaking an obvious robot for Captain Qwark in the first game and interpreting Qwark in drag "Qwark's sister" in UYA). Thinking about it a bit got me to realize: wasn't Clank just created at the beginning of the first game? Despite having a lot of book smarts, he's essentially a child, one who hasn't learned to pick up on things that aren't right in front of him just yet. - Michael JJ
    • Ratchet's personality in the first game makes a whole lot of sense in hindsight. He was SIXTEEN at the oldest! Imagine spending the first 15/16 years of your life with no idea if you had a family, no idea why you were left alone, not even any idea of what species you were. Yeah, this troper would be pretty damn moody and pessimistic too.
    • Some of Clank's personality traits are a bit of Fridge Brilliance, to this troper; his quieter, more observational nature, his rarely arguing with the polar-opposite Ratchet, his mild social ineptitude, his childlike trust and naivety... all of which are also Zoni traits.
    • Appearance of Lombaxes - big fluffy ears and prevalence of yellow fur shades - makes a lot of sense, considering that both the planet Ratchet lived on and homeworld of the species are desert planets. Ears probably act as heat sinks, and yellow is a good camouflage for the desert. - Unknown Troper
      • This also explains why Azimuth lives in Molonoth Fields, a desert wasteland.
      • Also explains how Ratchet can run around, in deserts sometimes, for so long without drinking anything.
    • In Ratchet & Clank 2 you visit the destroyed ruins of Gadgetron's facilities in the Bogon Galaxy, where everything is run by Mega-corp. The place is all but abandoned, but even the savages that now populate the place can't account for all the building damage here, right? Sometime later, you get a guided tour through a Megacorp Weapons Facility, where they show off several large bombs, including one that the tour guide states "took out the competition". In a further show of foreshadowing, the Gadgetron site is overrun with "Gadgetron cuddly hounds of death", effectively the same problem Captain Qwark unleashes upon the galaxy much later, but in a different form.
    • In the third game, Dr. Nefarious' plot is to turn the galaxy's population into robots, using technology which even Ratchet struggles to believe exists. In the backstory of the previous game, this is implied to be how Megacorp created the chicken sentries with no explanation of how they did it. Now consider that not only was Qwark in control of Megacorp for much of the previous game, he was at school with Nefarious and accidentally did the same to him. Qwark has a habit of using other people's ideas...
      • Also on the topic of Qwark and Megacorp, in the second game, one of the rejected products in the advert for Megacorp's testing facility is an offensive garden gnome. In the third game, these gnomes guard Qwark's base.
  • So we all know about the blatant Fandom Rivalry/Dueling Games vibe between Ratchet & Clank and Jak and Daxter — it's been there since the first installment of each series. What only occurred to me recently is how they mirror one another. On one hand, the main characters' personalities evolve in opposite directions: Jak starts out as a seemingly cheerful Silent Protagonist and ends up... well, we all know, whereas Ratchet was considered unlikable in his debut, and has become much more positive (and adorable) as the series wears on. On the other hand, they have a ton of points in common, mostly story-wise:
    • Both were sent to a different time/galaxy at a young age for safetyís sake and, building on that, they both grew up in a "backwater"/country setting.
    • Neither knew their families (ignoring Jak's uncle) and, when it came up, it became a plot point.
    • Both had a villain come after them (Kor and Tachyon) because of who/what they were, which led to finding out more about the aforementioned families.
    • The third installment of the games/the Future trilogy introduced a Cool Old Guy who was important to the aforementioned plot being part of the characterís family or close to the family in question, was an experienced warrior, an exile, and who died at/near the end of the game.
    • Iím fairly certain Iím forgetting something, but the last point I have (for now) is relatively minor compared to the others: the eponymous heroes from both series were separated for two years, at some point: Jak and Daxter in the intro to Renegade, and— if weíre counting each installment as one year— Ratchet and Clank at the end of Tools Of Destruction to midway-through A Crack in Time
    • On a more frivolous note, there is a character named Kaden/Kaedan in both series. They have little else in common.
  • Speaking of the Future trilogy, there's Fridge Brilliance mixed with an Ironic Echo and Crowning Moment of Heartwarming when you stop to consider the endings of Tools of Destruction and A Crack in Time. In the first, Ratchet was offered the chance to go 'home', which would entail leaving Clank. He refuses, obviously, but the look Clank gives him before he makes said decision makes it clear that, whichever choice was made, he would have supported Ratchet. Come ACiT, the roles are reversed, but the situation itself is quite similar— Ratchet even states outright that "I'll back whatever decision you make". While we're on the subject, it also connects smoothly to the last part of the first game... in more than one way. ("Hey tin can!")
  • While this could probably warrant a Playstation Move Heroes folder, it has quite a bit to do with the Future trilogy, and doesn't include the other franchises in the game at all. Near the end of the game, Ratchet mentions that he's "Had enough space-time fun for awhile"— this makes perfect sense after the game itself, since freezing time and inter-planetary travel both play a part in PSMH, but, as the Groovitron is one of the weapons featured in the game (among other details), it leads the player to believe that it takes place after Tools of Destruction, Quest for Booty and A Crack in Time. Ratchet probably wasn't referring to that adventure at all, after preventing the probably collapse of space/dimensions via the Dimensionator and a complete temporal meltdown thanks to Alister's misuse of the Great Clock. Being forced to compete in a game show probably pales in comparison... besides, they've already been there and done that.
  • Whenever you fire the RYNO V in Crack in Time it blurts out the end of the 1812 overture. In some performances, near the end of the song, a cannon is fired.
  • The shift of themes through the Future trilogy is actually rather brilliant, in hindsight. First we get Tools of Destruction, which focuses on the Dimensionator and, by extension, dimensions; space travel is utilized throughout the entire trilogy (less so in Quest For Booty, but a lot more in A Crack In Time) and A Crack in Time focused on the Great Clock and time. Time, space and dimensions— they're a set, just like the trilogy itself.
  • Ratchet's character development makes a lot more sense looking at where it happened and what was going on in the meantime:
    • In the first game he was something of The Scrappy, but it gives us a point of reference. (On a side note, he also had a change in voice actors between the original game and Going Commando, which makes sense since he was a teenager around that time.)
    • In Going Commando and Up Your Arsenal he was a bit more focused, the 'Jerk' part of Jerk with a Heart of Gold was toned down quite a bit, and he's downright heroic (to a would-be Heroic Sacrifice extent) in Deadlocked.
      • Size Matters sets this back a bit, but there's no indication that Deadlocked, Size Matters and Secret Agent Clank occurred in-universe in release order, so that may not be a problem.
    • He maintains this characterization all the way through Tools of Destruction— he's willing to be a hero, but still gets distracted by certain temptations (finding out more about the lombax race, the Dimensionator) and is rather blind to logic at times.
    • Between Quest for Booty and A Crack in Time, he's willing to sacrifice his own desires for a greater good with little to no prompting. So the original game gave us a point of reference and, up through Tools of Destruction, we got to see the effect that his friendship with Clank was having on Ratchet. The last part of his character development happened when he was on his own. He had to learn to deal with things without Clank to nudge him in the right direction, which was what changed the way he thought about and reacted to things. Kind of make's Clank's "This is the Ratchet I always knew was there" line Heartwarming In Hindsight, doesn't it?
      • Considering the above, Clank being able to fight alongside Ratchet in All 4 One makes much more sense. A Crack in Time shows that Ratchet can traverse planets without Clank on his back. Clank just needed the necessary upgrades to be able to preform at Ratchet's level, which also explains his increase in size.
  • Back when Ratchet didn't regularly wear armor, he only got a maximum of 8 nanotech. In Ratchet & Clank Future: A Crack In Time, Ratchet switches to Hard Light armor so the dev team can just turn it off for pre-rendered cutscenes to avoid No Cutscene Inventory Inertia - one of those cutscenes being the one where Alister kills Ratchet. Now, considering that the armor is both what holds most of Ratchet's nanotech and what cuts down the damage any one attack does, is it really so hard to believe that Alister Azimuth could kill him in one shot?
  • Also when fighting Azimuth during gameplay if you get hit by his shots you notice that it takes a good chunk of your health. In the cutscene where Ratchet's armour is OFF and gets killed you could imagine his pain.
  • Why does Klunk break character in Up Your Arsenal by delivering a Bond One-Liner after killing Courtney Gears? Because Nefarious didn't realise there was a difference between Clank the person and Secret Agent Clank the character!
  • At the beginning of A Crack in Time, Nefarious goes straight to using the Hypersonic Brainwave Scrambler against the Zoni. Considering the fact that he'd used it successfully against Orvus he would have known for a fact that it would be an effective weapon against the Zoni, too.
  • From a story-telling perspective, it makes perfect sense to have the control for the Great Clock break. Since Azimuth used his wrench to fix the damage he'd done, and it was later removed (as evidenced by the comics), it means that nobody would be able to use it again— at least, not without putting some forethought into it.
  • Why did it ever occur to Qwark to save Snowball? (Aside from his wanna-be-martyr moment.) Well, it worked well enough for him with that Blargian Snagglebeast.
  • During Jak and Daxter's story from Playstation All Stars Battle Royale, just before the rival battle, Daxter calls Clank a sidekick. Clank is visibly troubled by this, and Ratchet comes close to snarling at Daxter for it. It makes sense, considering the last time somebody used the same terminology.
    Ratchet: That's it. No one talks to Clank that way.
  • Qwark's Nurse Shannon disguise from ACiT and Nefarious's response makes a lot of sense considering the last Vid-comic from UYA, wherein Qwark disguises himself as a French maidwith a wig and his mask still on in an attempt to infiltrate Nefarious's base. He did exactly the same thing and Nefarious, aware that Qwark wouldn't think the plan would backfire, used it to his advantage.
    (Organic) Nefarious: The famous Captain Qwark couldn't possibly be this stupid, could he?
  • If you're not thinking about it, it's easy to miss the fact that the communications screen is actually part of Clank's hardware. Of course Clank has a multi-purpose screen installed— he was created in a factory that primarily made infobots.
  • In Ratchet & Clank: Into The Nexus, there are posters with Lombax writing on the walls of abandoned city. It makes sense, because the city was abandoned at about the same time that the Lombaxes disappeared - so the posters simply were not taken down in time.
  • Secret Agent Clank, Secret Agent Clank, they took away your number and they've given you a name.
  • While Ratchet's increased maneuverability and ability to strafe in the second game can easily be chalked up to gameplay additions, the story actually provides a decent source for them: Ratchet learnt how to move in combat thanks to his recent Megacorp training! It also explains his more vested interested in protecting people, something that's stuck with him ever since.
  • Alister Azimuth's last name is a term used for a horizontal angle measured clockwise from any fixed reference plane or easily established base direction line, usually starting from True North. In addition to the whole theme of Time in A Crack in Time, Azimuth's primary goal was to use the Great Clock to go back in time to rewrite the past, i.e.going counterclockwise. Speaking of which, during his Boss Fight, Azimuth circles around the Orvus Chamber going counterclockwise. The man is so consumed in his goal, he's even moving counterclockwise while fighting for his ideals!
  • On Aquatos in the third game, Ratchet puts on the Tyhrraguise, and what he says can be revealed by turning the subtitles on. As Clank leaves, Ratchet insults him with the phrase "Son of a Qwark!". What's the last thing Ratchet says in the Tyhrranese version of the sentence? A whopping great fart.
  • In "Tools of Destruction", we find out that the Lombaxes' final stand against Tachyon took place in the Temple of Azimuth on Fastoon. Fast forward to "A Crack in Time", where we meet General Alister Azimuth. Presumably, the temple was named in honor of one of his ancestors. So that makes The fact that the General unintentionally doomed the Lombaxes a double blow. Not only did he doom his race-he also brought down shame on a legacy that was great enough to build a temple to.

Fridge Logic
  • Battery bots. Who in their right mind would create sentient, sapient, independently mobile power sources? It's like they designed the most useful and pragmatic power source possible, and then created the very opposite of that.
    • Given their tendency to modify everything, I'll bet Lombaxes were involved.
  • In Deadlocked it's said that Vox Industries controls a small part of the Solana Galaxy known as the Shadow Sector. Megacorp controls the entire Bogon Galaxy, has experience fighting large rival corporations, and has 'planet buster' missiles, yet when they sent Vox the Holoshield Glove he was able to muscle his way out of paying Megacorp royalties selling it in his own private weapon vendors.
  • If Ratchet is such a brilliant mechanical mind, such that he's able to build his own ships from scratch and assemble the Levitator onto Clank just by reading the first instruction (which is written in Blargian!), why does he need to go to the Hypnotist in order to assemble the Hypnomatic in the second game?
    • Ratchet's a mechanic by trade so he would know the inner workings of most ships, allowing him to build them himself. As for the Levitator, Clank immediately has an Oh, Crap reaction when Ratchet says that the instructions are in Blargian. Since the Blarg are from Solana, the galaxy where he was raised, he'd probably speak the language. As for the Hypnomatic, it's a specialised handheld device so if he tried to repair it himself there could be a... problem. The Magic Circle keeps a tight lid on hypnosis because you can put someone into a trance, but you may not be able to take someone out of a trance.

Fridge Horror
  • Battery bots. They are sentient, they are sapient, and they are used as power sources. When picked up, they yell at you to put them down, they regularly rebel against those who use them, and when plugged into a power receptacle, they scream in what sounds like pain.
  • Even if Ratchet went along with Azimuth's plan to rewind time, Ratchet and Clank - as said by Azimuth - would never meet, which means that all the big bads of the series would succeed in their evil plans.
    • So Nefarious would have succeeded after all...
      • In his original plan, yes. His first act of villainy was the Aomeboid attack on Blackwater City; if he prevents Qwark from defeating him there, Qwark would never follow him to Magmos and unwittingly turn him into a robot, which starts Nefarious' vendetta against squishies that results in his villainous acts in the third game. Thus he would never have been defeated in that game, got stuck on the asteroid, went mad and look for a solution to his defeats, which would result in his A Crack in time plan... thus causing a colossal paradox!

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