Awesome: Wicked

  • "So if you care to find me—look to the western sky!" Defying Gravity is unspeakably amazing, in person or on the soundtrack.
    • In the show, towards the climax of the song, they lifted the actress up on a cable as pretty much every resource the stage crew had available was incorporated to make the scene as unbelievably epic as possible. It really must be experienced to be understood.
    • Even the moment that leads up to Elphaba being lifted up is epic. Elphaba and Glinda have just wished each other happiness, and Elphaba runs off. Then a bunch of guards attack Glinda, thinking she's the one they're after. We then hear Elphaba's voice shouting at them to release her, for it's not Glinda they want, it's her. Cue epic lifting moment and climax of the most epic musical theatre song in years.
    • The dialogue leading up to it is chillingly cool, too. This exchange in particular is awesome as it comes right after Elphaba is dubbed a Wicked Witch and her worst fear of being reviled by everyone she meets is effectively realized:
      Glinda: Don't be afraid.
      Elphaba: I'm not. It's The Wizard who should be afraid. Of me.
  • Glinda's epic takeover of Ozian politics at the end of the musical, starting by ordering the Wizard out of Oz and sending Morrible straight to jail with an Ironic Echo.
    Glinda: Madame, have you ever considered how you'd fare in captivity?
    Morrible: What?
    Glinda: Captivity! Prison! It is my personal opinion that you do not have what it takes. I hope you'll prove me wrong. I doubt you will, (to the guards) TAKE HER AWAY!
  • When the Wizard's guards capture Elphaba during her catfight with Glinda, Fiyero swings in on a vine and/or rope with his rifle and yells, "Let the green girl go!" The line is a little Narmy and the vine/rope doesn't make much sense since they're supposed to be in the middle of a corn field, but it makes his entrance hilariously awesome.
  • "No Good Deed" not only gives shivers, but it draws you right into Elphaba's mind. It's terrifying and heartbreaking, but it helps you sympathize with her.
  • Meta example: Dutch actress Willemijn Verkaik has played the role of Elphaba in four countries and three languages; her native Dutch in Holland, German in Germany, and English both on Broadway and in the West End. No other actress even comes close.