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** During the small-prize portion of Five Price Tags, contestants guess "false" ''extremely'' more often than "true". Taking advantage of this, the staff almost-always sets up this portion of the game to have only one out of the four prizes be "false". In one 2009 episode, ''all four'' prizes were "true", and the contestant did not get to try for the car due to getting "false" for each one.

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** During the small-prize portion of Five Price Tags, contestants guess "false" ''extremely'' more often than "true". Taking advantage of this, the staff almost-always sets up this portion of the game to have only one out of the four prizes be "false". In one 2009 episode, ''all four'' prizes were "true", and the contestant did not get to try for the car due to getting guessing "false" for each one.


* ComplacentGamingSyndrome: The $1-higher bid mentioned on the main page will almost always be the last bid in a round for each item up for bids in Contestants' Row.

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* ComplacentGamingSyndrome: ComplacentGamingSyndrome:
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The $1-higher bid or $1 bid mentioned on the main page will almost always be the last bid in a round for each item up for bids in Contestants' Row.Row.
** During the small-prize portion of Five Price Tags, contestants guess "false" ''extremely'' more often than "true". Taking advantage of this, the staff almost-always sets up this portion of the game to have only one out of the four prizes be "false". In one 2009 episode, ''all four'' prizes were "true", and the contestant did not get to try for the car due to getting "false" for each one.


* GoodBadBugs: The 1990 computer game versions had Secret X as a pricing game. A vertical tic-tac-toe counts as a win on this version despite this being against the rules on the actual show.

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* GoodBadBugs: The 1990 computer game versions games had Secret X as a pricing game. A vertical tic-tac-toe counts as a win on this version these versions despite this it being against the rules on the actual show.

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* GoodBadBugs: The 1990 computer game versions had Secret X as a pricing game. A vertical tic-tac-toe counts as a win on this version despite this being against the rules on the actual show.


** The 1990 [=GameTek=] versions released to the PC and Commodore 64. All prizes are chosen at random, meaning car games are often played for prizes other than cars. In Dice Game, numbers outside of the 1-6 range can and will be in the price. Cliff Hangers gives a $300-window for bidding on prizes, including [[NintendoHard cars]]. An in-depth look at these games can be found [[http://mstiescott.tripod.com/tpirgame/tpir.html here]].

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** The 1990 [=GameTek=] versions released to the PC and Commodore 64. All prizes are chosen at random, meaning car games are often played for prizes other than cars. In Dice Game, numbers outside of the 1-6 range can and will be in the price. Cliff Hangers gives a $300-window [[FakeDifficulty $300 window]] for bidding on prizes, including [[NintendoHard cars]]. An in-depth look at these games can be found [[http://mstiescott.tripod.com/tpirgame/tpir.html here]].


* EarWorm: The "come on down" music, the main theme, the yodeling music played in Cliff Hangers (entitled "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QfTEhUECaXk On the Franches Mountains]]"), the Check Game/Cover Up/Make Your Move background music (introduced in either late season 16 or 17), etc.


** Mike Richards (the show’s executive producer from 2009-2019) got flak for replacing Roger Dobkowitz as series producer in Season 37 due to Creator/FremantleMedia's decision to put the show in a new direction, and replacing Syd Vinnedge as Executive Producer the following season. Bart Eskander's replacement, Rich [=DiPirro=], once went so far as to tell him he was ruining this show. Some fans who hold this stance don’t have high hopes for ''Series/WheelOfFortune'' and ''Series/Jeopardy'' (as Richards replaces the retiring Harry Friedman, himself considered an example on the former, on those shows).

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** Mike Richards (the show’s executive producer from 2009-2019) got flak for replacing Roger Dobkowitz as series producer in Season 37 due to Creator/FremantleMedia's decision to put the show in a new direction, and replacing Syd Vinnedge as Executive Producer the following season. Bart Eskander's replacement, Rich [=DiPirro=], once went so far as to tell him he was ruining this show. Some fans who hold this stance don’t have high hopes for ''Series/WheelOfFortune'' and ''Series/Jeopardy'' (as ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'', as Richards replaces the retiring Harry Friedman, Friedman [[note]] himself considered an example on the former, former [[/note]] on those shows).shows.


** Mike Richards (the show’s executive producer from 2009-2019) got flak for replacing Roger Dobkowitz as series producer in Season 37 due to Creator/FremantleMedia's decision to put the show in a new direction, and replacing Syd Vinnedge as Executive Producer the following season. Bart Eskander's replacement, Rich [=DiPirro=], once went so far as to tell him he was ruining this show.

to:

** Mike Richards (the show’s executive producer from 2009-2019) got flak for replacing Roger Dobkowitz as series producer in Season 37 due to Creator/FremantleMedia's decision to put the show in a new direction, and replacing Syd Vinnedge as Executive Producer the following season. Bart Eskander's replacement, Rich [=DiPirro=], once went so far as to tell him he was ruining this show. Some fans who hold this stance don’t have high hopes for ''Series/WheelOfFortune'' and ''Series/Jeopardy'' (as Richards replaces the retiring Harry Friedman, himself considered an example on the former, on those shows).


** Mike Richards got flak for replacing Roger Dobkowitz as series producer in Season 37 due to Creator/FremantleMedia's decision to put the show in a new direction, and replacing Syd Vinnedge as Executive Producer the following season. Bart Eskander's replacement, Rich [=DiPirro=], once went so far as to tell him he was ruining this show.

to:

** Mike Richards (the show’s executive producer from 2009-2019) got flak for replacing Roger Dobkowitz as series producer in Season 37 due to Creator/FremantleMedia's decision to put the show in a new direction, and replacing Syd Vinnedge as Executive Producer the following season. Bart Eskander's replacement, Rich [=DiPirro=], once went so far as to tell him he was ruining this show.


** [[JustifiedTrope Justified]] in that games like this are typically included because they're short, which helps keep the show within its time limit after playing something a lot more time-consuming (Plinko, Golden Road, etc.).

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** [[JustifiedTrope Justified]] in that games like this are typically included because they're short, which helps keep the show within its time limit after playing something a lot more time-consuming (Plinko, Golden Road, etc.). And as mentioned, games such as those and Pick-a-Number can be a fallback if one of the more intricate games is on the fritz.

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** At the beginning of the January 8, 1987 episode, Bob joked that Janice Pennington remarked after she handed the mic to him that the crowd wouldn't be applauding as much [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oDq1lE0cEXM if they knew him better]]. Rather interesting choice of words considering the various controversies that clouded the final 15 years of his tenure.


* MostAnnoyingSound: The LosingHorns can get on your nerves after some time.


** Season 44 introduced a College Rivals special (mainly coinciding with the NCAA basketball tournament) with drastically altered rules: two pairs of students from different rival colleges were called down to Contestant's Row. The winner of the One-Bid came onstage to play a pricing game, and their rival was ''[[UnPerson sent back to the audience]]''. [[SarcasmMode It gets better]]: if the pricing game was lost, the rival pocketed $1,000. Then, another pair of rivals were called down which became the norm for the rest of the show. Fans denounced the special for stooping so low and encouraging a mean-spirited atmosphere. Unfortunately, the staff didn't get the hint and the show made the specials an annual occurrence. Season 46 did a college football-oriented version for Thanksgiving too. However, the producers seem to have finally gotten the message, as the entire year of 2018 had no College Rivals specials, and Season 47 hasn't had any in either November or March.

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** Season 44 introduced a College Rivals special (mainly coinciding with the NCAA basketball tournament) with drastically altered rules: two pairs of students from different rival colleges were called down to Contestant's Row. The winner of the One-Bid came onstage to play a pricing game, and their rival was ''[[UnPerson sent back to the audience]]''. [[SarcasmMode It gets better]]: if the pricing game was lost, the rival pocketed $1,000. Then, another pair of rivals were called down which became the norm for the rest of the show. Fans denounced the special for stooping so low and encouraging a mean-spirited atmosphere. Unfortunately, the staff didn't get the hint and the show made the specials an annual occurrence. Season 46 did a college football-oriented version for Thanksgiving too. However, the producers seem to have finally gotten the message, as the entire year of 2018 had no College Rivals specials, and None were held in Season 47 hasn't had any in either November or March.47, but they will return for Season 48 (the first season since Richards’ departure).

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*** This was Lampshaded on a "superfan" special, where the prices were ''exactly'' $20-$30-$40.


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** '''Coming or Going''': A rule that has held true for nearly all playings for the past several years: if the prize is a trip, "Going" is the right answer (a pun on "going on a trip"). If the prize is anything other than a trip, "Coming" should be correct.

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** Similarly, two members of the indie rock band Music/{{Arcade Fire}}, Tim Kingsbury and Richard Reed Parry, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dyzjWoRDSHs were also spotted in the audience]] (but never called down) during a June 2007 episode, but this is an inversion as they were already fairly famous in the indie rock scene.

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