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* RearrangeTheSong: Season 2 uses a new recording of the David Mook theme sung by Austin Roberts, who also performed the chase songs.

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** Velma and Daphne do not actually utter their exclamatory catchphrases ("Jinkies!" and "Jeepers", respectively) in the show's entire run. They would not until ''WesternAnimation/TheNewScoobyDooMovies''.

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* UncannyFamilyResemblance: Seen in "Haunted House Hang-Up," where the gang is investigating said house, supposedly haunted by the headless Ghost of Jefferson Stillwall. Later, he's revealed to be Jefferson's grandson Penrod, whom looks very much like Jefferson, albeit with less hair on top of his head, but still with practically the same face. Most notable is that Penrod was scaring people away because he was afraid someone would steal his grandfather's treasure, which the ''actual'' villain of this episode later attempts to do (while [[PaperThinDisguise cheaply disguised]] as a BedsheetGhost).


** Established a number of gags that continue throughout the franchise, including: Scooby and Shaggy's apparent cowardice, and Fred's traps that either malfunction or are trigger prematurely by Scooby and/or Shaggy.

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** Established a number of gags that continue throughout the franchise, including: including Scooby and Shaggy's apparent cowardice, and Fred's traps that either malfunction or are trigger triggered prematurely by Scooby and/or Shaggy.

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* RunningGag:
** Scooby being bribed to do something with the offer of one (or often more) Scooby Snacks, usually after a scene in which Scooby feigns illness in order to avoid going into harm's way.
** Established a number of gags that continue throughout the franchise, including: Scooby and Shaggy's apparent cowardice, and Fred's traps that either malfunction or are trigger prematurely by Scooby and/or Shaggy.


* DisproportionateRetribution: The general format throughout the franchise is everyone caught doing the ScoobyDooHoax is arrested and sent to jail. However, while certainly other legal action such as lawsuits might result, not every hoaxster's actions justify imprisonment or even arrest.

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* DisproportionateRetribution: The general format throughout the franchise is everyone caught doing the ScoobyDooHoax is arrested and sent to jail. However, while certainly other legal action such as lawsuits might result, not every hoaxster's actions justify imprisonment or even arrest. An early example is the "villain" of "Hassle in the Castle" whose only apparent crime is treasure-hunting on a deserted island and using magic tricks to scare away intruders (if he's guilty of anything worse, such as trespassing, it's not indicated).


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** This series is the only one to ''not'' actually hyphenate the name Scooby-Doo in the title.


* DisproportionateRetribution: The general format throughout the franchise is everyone caught doing the ScoobyDooHoax is arrested and sent to jail. However, while certainly other legal action such as lawsuits might result, not every hoaxster's actions justify imprisonment or even arrest.



* ReplacedTheThemeTune: Ted Nichols' [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ecxXXvB5kUs original instrumental theme]] for the series is utilized in the original 1969 broadcasts of "What a Night for a Knight" and "A Clue for Scooby-Doo", then quickly replaced by the more-familiar lyrical song in "Hassle in the Castle".

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* ReplacedTheThemeTune: Ted Nichols' [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ecxXXvB5kUs original instrumental theme]] for the series is utilized in the original 1969 broadcasts of "What a Night for a Knight" and "A Clue for Scooby-Doo", then quickly replaced by the more-familiar lyrical song in "Hassle in the Castle". Current syndicated and DVD-released versions of the episodes use the lyrical theme.



* ScoobyDoobyDoors: TropeNamer. Though used before Scooby-Doo, this series could've made it famous. It first appeared in "Nowhere to Hyde."

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* ScoobyDoobyDoors: TropeNamer. Though used before Scooby-Doo, this series could've made it famous. It first appeared in "Nowhere to Hyde.Hyde" although an early variant (without the chase aspect) appears in one of the first episodes, "Mine Your Own Business."



* SeventiesHair: The characters were designed in 1969, but close enough.

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* SeventiesHair: The characters were designed in 1969, but close enough. Fred's hair, in particular, conforms to the style of the early 70s.


** In this series, it was strongly implied that Fred and Daphne were boyfriend-and-girlfriend, such as dancing together at parties and whatnot, but it was never confirmed if they were an OfficialCouple.

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** In this series, it was strongly implied that Fred and Daphne were boyfriend-and-girlfriend, such as dancing together at parties parties, wearing complementary ascots, and whatnot, but it was never confirmed if they were an OfficialCouple.

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** The depiction of Scooby Doo in this series acts as one for the franchise in general as his behavior - talking, reading, etc notwithstanding - is more like that of a typical dog (sniffing, barking, etc.) than in later series and films.

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* ExorcistHead: Accidentally and hilariously invoked several years before the trope namer in the 1969 episode "Mine Your Own Business" (a.k.a. the one with Miner 49'er) when due to an animation error, Fred's head turns 180 degrees to look at something behind him, without the rest of his body moving.


* [[DangerTakesABackSeat Danger Takes a Front Seat]]: The Creeper.

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* [[DangerTakesABackSeat Danger Takes a Front Seat]]: The Creeper.DangerTakesABackSeat:
** In "Nowhere to Hyde", Hyde sneaks into the back of the Mystery Machine while the gang eats dinner. He's only discovered when Velma asks Scooby to retrieve the blanket under which he was hiding.
** Inverted in one episode; the gang finds the Creeper in the driver's seat of the Mystery Machine.

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** Shaggy doesn't address Scooby as popularized shortening "Scoob" until the ninth episode, "The Backstage Rage" (1969).

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**In "What a Night for a Knight" (1969), the series' first episode, the only character expressing any interest in food is Scooby. Shaggy and everybody else eat nothing. Shaggy is later depicted as a Big Eater.
**In "What a Night for a Knight", the characters Scooby, Shaggy, Daphne, and Velma are called by name. Despite the fact that Fred is hanging with them for most of the episode, his name is not mentioned at all. He also does not interact much with the other protagonists.
**In "A Clue for Scooby Doo" (1969), the second episode, the team has unmasked the villain of the episode, but still do not know who he is, because they have never seen his face before. The man is clean-shaven, but Shaggy has the idea to place seaweed on his face. Shaggy realizes that the guy is Captain Cutler, who faked his death years ago. Shaggy recognizes him from a bearded portrait of a younger Cutler, which he had seen earlier that day. Shaggy acts as the smart guy of the team, while Velma is mostly irrelevant here. In most later episodes, unmasking and recognizing the villain is Velma's main task.
**In "Foul Play in Funland" (1969), the eighth episode, Daphne explains to Shaggy about Scooby's apparent aversion, as if she is more familiar with Scooby's tastes in food. Most later episodes have Shaggy both knowing Scooby's tastes and sharing several of them.

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* EndOfEpisodeSilliness: Each episode typically ends with Scooby, Shaggy or both doing something silly, often leading to the obligatory EverybodyLaughsEnding. Sometimes it's unintentional, but there are other times where it's an intentional joke or prank on the rest of the gang.

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* TalkingIsAFreeAction: Shows up very frequently--the whole gang, or one or more members (usually Shaggy and Scooby), would encounter one of the villains and panic/shout/generally babble before actually doing anything...all while the villain in question simply stood there instead of, say, attacking. There's a slight justification in that most of the bad guys were trying to scare off the kids, not harm them, but still, they're remarkably considerate about waiting for them to start running to begin the chase.
** It's taken to a ridiculous extreme in "Mystery Mask Mix-Up"--and this time, there's ''no'' excusing it, as the villains are specifically trying to kidnap Daphne. When the jiangshi pursuing them first show up, Velma tells Scooby to "make like a watchdog." What follows is a two-minute sequence in which Scooby pretends to be a boxer, runs into a Chinese laundromat, talks with the owner, borrows a shirt press, and creates a smokescreen to provide an escape...all while the jiangshi in question stand absolutely still. It's later averted by the monsters themselves, who use the gang's chatting after crashing the Mystery Machine to kidnap Daphne...and then played straight by the Ghost of Zhen Tuo simply watching Shaggy brush off his face with the robe he's wearing.

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