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* JusticeByOtherLegalMeans: See DisproportionateRetribution above. If a villain isn't ''technically'' doing anything wrong, such as Oakley and Bluestone[[note]]who were just looking for treasure without otherwise disturbing anybody or violating a law[[/note]], it would always be pointed out that they were being arrested for some completely ''unrelated'' offenses.[[note]]Both were apparently criminals wanted in several other states[[/note]].

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* JusticeByOtherLegalMeans: See DisproportionateRetribution above. If a villain isn't ''technically'' doing anything wrong, such as Oakley and Bluestone[[note]]who were just looking for treasure without otherwise disturbing anybody or violating a law[[/note]], it would always be pointed out that they were being arrested for some completely ''unrelated'' offenses.[[note]]Both were apparently criminals wanted in several other states[[/note]]. states[[/note]]

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* JusticeByOtherLegalMeans: See DisproportionateRetribution above. If a villain isn't ''technically'' doing anything wrong, such as Oakley and Bluestone[[note]]who were just looking for treasure without otherwise disturbing anybody or violating a law[[/note]], it would always be pointed out that they were being arrested for some completely ''unrelated'' offenses.[[note]]Both were apparently criminals wanted in several other states[[/note]].

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* {{Leitmotif}}: There is a central theme in the musical underscore by Ted Nichols, mixed across a ThemeAndVariationsSoundtrack, with a riff that has the same number of notes as the syllable count of "Scooby-Doo, where are you?".


* LaughTrack: The original network versions on CBS (and later ABC) used an artificial laugh track, as with many other H-B properties at the time. However, when the episodes entered syndication in 1980, the laugh track was removed, and with the exception of the first two episodes, would not reappear until 1997, when the episodes were remastered for airing on Cartoon Network after the Turner/Time Warner merger the previous year.

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* LaughTrack: The original network versions on CBS (and later ABC) used an artificial laugh track, as with many other H-B properties at the time. However, when the episodes entered syndication in 1980, the laugh track was removed, and with the exception of the first two episodes, would not reappear until 1997, when the episodes were remastered for airing on Cartoon Network after the Turner/Time Warner merger the previous year. All home video releases since have used the original network mixes.


* LaughTrack

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* LaughTrackLaughTrack: The original network versions on CBS (and later ABC) used an artificial laugh track, as with many other H-B properties at the time. However, when the episodes entered syndication in 1980, the laugh track was removed, and with the exception of the first two episodes, would not reappear until 1997, when the episodes were remastered for airing on Cartoon Network after the Turner/Time Warner merger the previous year.


*** It's also the only series to ''not'' actually hyphenate the name Scooby-Doo in the title.

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*** It's also the only series to ''not'' actually hyphenate the name Scooby-Doo in the title. Promos during the original CBS run ''did'' use the hyphen, however.


* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: The show originally opened for the first two episodes with an instrumental theme by Ted Nichols, who composed the incidental music for the rest of the show. This theme was only heard in the first two episodes before being replaced with the much more well known David Mook vocal theme song.
** Which leads to a KeepCirculatingTheTapes situation because those episodes were appended with the Mook theme on DVD and new airings of the show.
** In "What a Night for a Knight" (1969), the series' first episode, the only character expressing any interest in food is Scooby. Shaggy and everybody else eat nothing. Shaggy is later depicted as a Big Eater.
** In "What a Night for a Knight", the characters Scooby, Shaggy, Daphne, and Velma are called by name. Despite the fact that Fred is hanging with them for most of the episode, his name is not mentioned at all. He also does not interact much with the other protagonists.

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* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: EarlyInstallmentWeirdness:
**
The show originally opened for the first two episodes with an instrumental theme by Ted Nichols, who composed the incidental music for the rest of the show. This theme was only heard in the first two episodes before being replaced with the much more well known David Mook vocal theme song.
** Which
song.[[note]]Which leads to a KeepCirculatingTheTapes situation because those episodes were appended with the Mook theme on DVD and new airings of the show.
show.[[/note]]
** In "What a Night for a Knight" (1969), the series' first episode, the only character expressing any interest in food is Scooby. Shaggy and everybody else eat nothing. Shaggy is later depicted as a Big Eater. \n** In "What a Night for a Knight", Also in the same episode, the characters Scooby, Shaggy, Daphne, and Velma are called by name. Despite the fact that Fred is hanging with them for most of the episode, his name is not mentioned at all. He also does not interact much with the other protagonists.



** In "Foul Play in Funland" (1969), the eighth episode, Daphne explains to Shaggy about Scooby's apparent aversion, as if she is more familiar with Scooby's tastes in food. Most later episodes have Shaggy both knowing Scooby's tastes and sharing several of them.

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** In "Foul Play in Funland" (1969), Funland"(1969) , the eighth episode, Daphne explains to Shaggy about Scooby's apparent aversion, as if she is more familiar with Scooby's tastes in food. Most later episodes have Shaggy both knowing Scooby's tastes and sharing several of them.



** The depiction of Scooby Doo in this series acts as one for the franchise in general as his behavior - talking, reading, etc notwithstanding - is more like that of a typical dog (sniffing, barking, etc.) than in later series and films.
** This series is the only one to ''not'' actually hyphenate the name Scooby-Doo in the title.
** Velma does not actually utter her exclamatory catchphrase ("Jinkies!") in the show's entire run. She would not until ''WesternAnimation/TheNewScoobyDooMovies''.
** Similarly, Daphne only says "Jeepers!" once, in "What the Hex is Going On?" (1969).

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** In comparisons between this series and later entries in the franchise:
***
The depiction of Scooby Doo in this series acts as one for the franchise in general as his Doo. His behavior - talking, reading, etc notwithstanding - is more like that of a typical dog (sniffing, barking, etc.) than in later series and films.
** This series is *** It's also the only one series to ''not'' actually hyphenate the name Scooby-Doo in the title.
** *** Velma does not actually utter her exclamatory catchphrase ("Jinkies!") in the show's entire run. She would not until ''WesternAnimation/TheNewScoobyDooMovies''.
** *** Similarly, Daphne only says "Jeepers!" once, in "What the Hex is Going On?" (1969).

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* BigBallOfViolence: Happens twice in "Jeepers, It's the Creeper":
** After Velma, Fred and Daphne jump on Scooby and Shaggy (mistaking them for the Creeper), the resulting punch-up is obscured by a dust cloud.
** The climatic chase ends with a Big ''Hay-Pile'' of Violence, courtesy of Shaggy, Velma, Fred, Daphne and the Creeper.

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* MickeyMousing: Rare, since most of the background music is simply tracked in and edited accordingly for later episodes, but the very first chase sequence with the Black Knight in "What a Night for a Knight" was scored specifically for this episode in particular, and matches one-to-one with the action, complete with a riff on the U.S. Air Force Theme when Shaggy and Scooby fly the biplane.


** Velma and Daphne do not actually utter their exclamatory catchphrases ("Jinkies!" and "Jeepers", respectively) in the show's entire run. They would not until ''WesternAnimation/TheNewScoobyDooMovies''.

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** Velma and Daphne do does not actually utter their her exclamatory catchphrases ("Jinkies!" and "Jeepers", respectively) catchphrase ("Jinkies!") in the show's entire run. They She would not until ''WesternAnimation/TheNewScoobyDooMovies''.''WesternAnimation/TheNewScoobyDooMovies''.
** Similarly, Daphne only says "Jeepers!" once, in "What the Hex is Going On?" (1969).


* GenreSavvy: The CW's show ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' takes the characters from the show--Sam, Dean and Castiel--and plops them into the cartoon world, specifically the Scooby episode "A Night Of Fright Is No Delight." It follows the storyline up until the ghost--only one, as opposed to the original episode's two--shows up and it's a real ghost. The three find that Scooby and the gang cannot have their status quo disrupted so they have to capture the ghost unnoticed. They do, and find it to be the spirit of a deceased little boy who was forced to do all the evil things he did. In turn for helping get him to his final reward, the boy helps Sam, Dean and Castiel in keeping the mystery the ScoobyDooHoax it was meant to be.

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** Fred, Daphne and Velma share a "Zoinks!" in "A Tiki Scare is No Fair".


* DoesNotLikeShoes: "Jeepers, It's the Jaguaro!" implies that Velma ''may'' be a subtle version of this. When the gang is at the carnival in Rio de Janeiro at the end of the episode, Velma is barefoot - which is unusual, given that they are out in the streets, and all the other gang members wear shoes.
** Likewise, at the end of "A Tiki Scare is No Fair" there's a party on Hawaii, and Velma is the only team member who changes from her usual clothes to a traditional Hawaii attire - bare feet included.

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* DoesNotLikeShoes: Velma may be a barefooter deep down; in at least two occasions, she was barefoot by choice while Shaggy, Fred and Daphne were shod.
** At the end of
"Jeepers, It's the Jaguaro!" implies that Velma ''may'' be a subtle version of this. When the gang is at the carnival in Rio de Janeiro at the end of the episode, Velma Janeiro, and she is barefoot - which is unusual, given that they are out in the streets, and all the other gang members wear shoes.
** Likewise, at the end of "A Tiki Scare is No Fair" there's a party on Hawaii, and Velma is the only team member who changes from her usual clothes to a traditional Hawaii island attire - bare feet included.

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** Likewise, at the end of "A Tiki Scare is No Fair" there's a party on Hawaii, and Velma is the only team member who changes from her usual clothes to a traditional Hawaii attire - bare feet included.

Added DiffLines:

* DoesNotLikeShoes: "Jeepers, It's the Jaguaro!" implies that Velma ''may'' be a subtle version of this. When the gang is at the carnival in Rio de Janeiro at the end of the episode, Velma is barefoot - which is unusual, given that they are out in the streets, and all the other gang members wear shoes.

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