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* Visser Three from ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}''. He's completely immoral and monstrous, but as a consequence of appearing in almost every book and not killing the Animorphs, he quickly starts to come across as a blundering clod. Visser One even acknowledges this in ''The Visser Chronicles'', comparing him less-than-favorably to the Helmacrons. While he does get promoted to Visser One towards the end, he still doesn't undo a lot of this.
** It becomes funny when even Visser Three starts noticing the effect. "Would it be too much to ask for one of you to actually HIT SOMETHING?!?!"

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* ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'':
**
Visser Three from ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}''. Three:
***
He's completely immoral and monstrous, but as a consequence of appearing in almost every book and not killing the Animorphs, he quickly starts to come across as a blundering clod. Visser One even acknowledges this in ''The Visser Chronicles'', comparing him less-than-favorably to the Helmacrons.Helmacrons - an egomaniacal alien race who never rise beyond a joke due their self-defeating tendencies. While he does get promoted to Visser One towards the end, he still doesn't undo a lot of this.
** *** It becomes funny when even Visser Three starts noticing the effect. "Would it be too much to ask for one of you to actually HIT SOMETHING?!?!"


* In the final book of ''Literature/TheDarkTower'' series, [[{{Archenemy}} Walter o'Dim/Randall Flagg]] and the [[BigBad Crimson King]], the two main villains up until that point, are reduced to almost non-entities. In particular Flagg, who had once been considered King's 'ubervillain', is easily dispatched in one chapter by a newly introduced character, who finds him pathetic. This is especially troublesome to some fans, since Flagg has been especially troublesome to numerous Creator/StephenKing characters over the years, even surviving (or, more accurately, respawning after) a nuclear blast. Having Mordred kill him is obviously to establish Mordred as even more sinister and dangerous than Flagg, but that's a bit hard, if not impossible, after developing the Flagg character for decades and across numerous books. Made worse by the fact that Mordred's death is very anticlimactic (weakened by food poisoning due to eating the disease-ridden corpse of Lippy the horse, Roland kills him with one shot).

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* In [[Literature/TheDarkTower2004 the final book book]] of ''Literature/TheDarkTower'' series, [[{{Archenemy}} Walter o'Dim/Randall Flagg]] and the [[BigBad Crimson King]], the two main villains up until that point, are reduced to almost non-entities. In particular Flagg, who had once been considered King's 'ubervillain', is easily dispatched in one chapter by a newly introduced character, who finds him pathetic. This is especially troublesome to some fans, since Flagg has been especially troublesome to numerous Creator/StephenKing characters over the years, even surviving (or, more accurately, respawning after) a nuclear blast. Having Mordred kill him is obviously to establish Mordred as even more sinister and dangerous than Flagg, but that's a bit hard, if not impossible, after developing the Flagg character for decades and across numerous books. Made worse by the fact that Mordred's death is very anticlimactic (weakened by food poisoning due to eating the disease-ridden corpse of Lippy the horse, Roland kills him with one shot).


* Section 31 in the Franchise/StarTrekNovelVerse has been getting hit hard with this lately. In their original television appearances, Section 31 agents could dance circles around other foreign intelligence services and had some truly devious, if extremely morally questionable, {{Batman Gambit}}s going on. Now, their operations are routinely foiled by Julian Bashir and his allies. In fact, despite Bashir ruining several of their master plans, Section 31 remains absolutely obsessed with recruiting him to the extent that it borders on StalkerWithACrush territory. They're portrayed as so incompetent at their mission of protecting the Federation that they fail to prevent [[spoiler:the assassination of President Nanietta Bacco]] but also [[spoiler:don't know that her successor is a Cardassian mole.]] It seems David Mack realized this and ''Literature/StarTrekSection31Control'' undid this, [[TheBadGuyWins hard]]. [[spoiler:All those failures? The AI controlling Section 31 planned for them and recruited Bashir to help take down the agency.]]

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* Section 31 in the Franchise/StarTrekNovelVerse Literature/StarTrekNovelVerse has been getting hit hard with this lately. In their original television appearances, Section 31 agents could dance circles around other foreign intelligence services and had some truly devious, if extremely morally questionable, {{Batman Gambit}}s going on. Now, their operations are routinely foiled by Julian Bashir and his allies. In fact, despite Bashir ruining several of their master plans, Section 31 remains absolutely obsessed with recruiting him to the extent that it borders on StalkerWithACrush territory. They're portrayed as so incompetent at their mission of protecting the Federation that they fail to prevent [[spoiler:the assassination of President Nanietta Bacco]] but also [[spoiler:don't know that her successor is a Cardassian mole.]] It seems David Mack realized this and ''Literature/StarTrekSection31Control'' undid this, [[TheBadGuyWins hard]]. [[spoiler:All those failures? The AI controlling Section 31 planned for them and recruited Bashir to help take down the agency.]]


* Rat and Jolly U in ''Literature/AliceGirlFromTheFuture''. When they appear for the first few times, they are cold-blooded murderers who don't shy away from torture, but then, as a preteen girl continues to defeat them again, and again, and again (and the fans grow used to them), things change. In ''A Girl From Earth'', everyone is frozen with horror at the idea of two space pirates still on the loose, and in the later stories, it's more like: "[[FriendlyEnemy Alice's friends]] Rat and Jolly U are running around somewhere oh well".

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* Rat and Jolly U in ''Literature/AliceGirlFromTheFuture''. When they appear for the first few times, they are cold-blooded murderers who don't shy away from torture, but then, as a preteen girl continues to defeat them again, and again, and again (and the fans grow used to them), things change. In ''A Girl From Earth'', ''Literature/TheVoyageOfAlice'', everyone is frozen with horror at the idea of two space pirates still on the loose, and in the later stories, it's more like: "[[FriendlyEnemy Alice's friends]] Rat and Jolly U are running around somewhere oh well".


* For a slightly less deadly kind of enemy, by the last ''Bridget Jones'' book, the arch cad and menace to happy relationships Daniel Cleaver has been demoted to eccentric friend who babysit's Bridget's children.

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* For a slightly less deadly kind of enemy, by the last ''Bridget Jones'' book, the arch cad and menace to happy relationships Daniel Cleaver has been demoted to eccentric friend who babysit's Bridget's children. This is partly because Daniel has become considerably less attractive with age, especially as he has become an alcoholic. In the meantime, Bridget has grown more confident in the years that she and Mark were married, so that she now realises she can find love with a good man and doesn't have to settle for any kind of boyfriend who will have her. One way and another, the realisation that Daniel had been having affairs with her friends at the same time that she was interested in him is such ancient history that it no longer matters - she knows that Daniel won't change, and doesn't particularly care.

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* SCORPIA, the NebulousEvilOrganisation that serves as the BigBad of the ''Literature/AlexRider'' books, suffer an InUniverse version: a fourteen-year-old boy foiling their plans quickly destroys their credibility in the criminal world. Their third defeat at Alex's hands leaves them such a laughing stock that the organisation disbands.

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* Rat and Jolly U in ''Literature/AliceGirlFromTheFuture''. When they appear for the first few times, they are cold-blooded murderers who don't shy away from torture, but then, as a preteen girl continues to defeat them again, and again, and again (and the fans grow used to them), things change. In ''A Girl From Earth'', everyone is frozen with horror at the idea of two space pirates still on the loose, and in the later stories, it's more like: "[[FriendlyEnemy Alice's friends]] Rat and Jolly U are running around somewhere oh well".


* Inverted in ''Literature/TheBelgariad''. Belgarath talks smack about Ctuchik throughout the series, obviously considering him a two-penny warlock with delusions of adequacy. However, when the two face off, Ctuchik manages to fight Belgarath (who is at that point seven thousand years old, widely considered to be the most powerful sorcerer in the word, and the Satan-analogue of the faith Ctuchik is a priest of) to a standstill.

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* Inverted in ''Literature/TheBelgariad''. Belgarath talks smack about Ctuchik throughout the series, obviously considering him a two-penny warlock with delusions of adequacy. However, when the two face off, Ctuchik manages to fight Belgarath (who is at that point seven thousand years old, widely considered to be the most powerful sorcerer in the word, and the Satan-analogue of the faith Ctuchik is a priest of) word) to a standstill.

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** The Crimson King goes from a shadowy menace who's behind everything happening, who's terrifying because he's unknown and unseen, to a cackling madman throwing grenades from a balcony. He's effectively destroyed by a pencil eraser.

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** Draco's example is a bit more complex. From the start, he was Harry's greatest rival in school, and the source of most of Harry's non-Voldemort-related troubles. He's even called Harry's arch-nemesis in Book 2. However, once Harry starts facing down Voldemort more, he starts to see Draco less as a menace and more of a nuisance. He basically laughs in Draco's face when the latter threatens him at the end of Book 5. So the trope gets played straight, and then get inverted as mentioned above.


** An inversion of this trope occurs when Severus Snape and Draco Malfoy are presented as mere {{Jerkass}}es who like giving Harry and company hell for the first five books of the series, but at the beginning of book six, both are presented as high ranking members of Voldemort's army, the Death Eaters. [[spoiler: It does turn out however that Snape was a DoubleAgent for the Order of Phoenix, and Malfoy was incapable of coping with actually being evil.]]

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** An inversion of this trope occurs when Severus Snape and Draco Malfoy are presented as mere {{Jerkass}}es who like giving Harry and company hell for the first five books of the series, but at the beginning of book six, both are presented as high ranking members of Voldemort's army, the Death Eaters. [[spoiler: It [[spoiler:It does turn out however that Snape was a DoubleAgent for the Order of Phoenix, and Malfoy was incapable of coping with actually being evil.]]



* Sang-Drax from ''Literature/TheDeathGateCycle'' series was introduced in the fifth book as a MagnificentBastard manifestation of the BigBad that could play [[AntiHero Haplo]] like a fiddle. While he's still cunning in the next two books, he gets a whole lot sloppier, downgrading him to a literal SmugSnake. He finally dies when [[spoiler: a room caves in on him. This isn't as lame as it sounds because said room was filled with magic that was antithetical to him, but still -- he really should have seen it coming]].

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* Sang-Drax from ''Literature/TheDeathGateCycle'' series was introduced in the fifth book as a MagnificentBastard manifestation of the BigBad that could play [[AntiHero Haplo]] like a fiddle. While he's still cunning in the next two books, he gets a whole lot sloppier, downgrading him to a literal SmugSnake. He finally dies when [[spoiler: a [[spoiler:a room caves in on him. This isn't as lame as it sounds because said room was filled with magic that was antithetical to him, but still -- he really should have seen it coming]].



** This becomes even more obvious when Petyr "Littlefinger" Baelish, a villain who was previously viewed as harmless (and still is considered as such in-universe) [[NotSoHarmlessVillain before throwing that façade out the window]] [[spoiler: along with his wife,]] finds Cersei's stupidity and the fact that she still believes herself to be a {{Magnificent B|astard}}itch rather amusing

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** This becomes even more obvious when Petyr "Littlefinger" Baelish, a villain who was previously viewed as harmless (and still is considered as such in-universe) [[NotSoHarmlessVillain before throwing that façade out the window]] [[spoiler: along [[spoiler:along with his wife,]] finds Cersei's stupidity and the fact that she still believes herself to be a {{Magnificent B|astard}}itch rather amusing



* Section 31 in the Franchise/StarTrekNovelVerse has been getting hit hard with this lately. In their original television appearances, Section 31 agents could dance circles around other foreign intelligence services and had some truly devious, if extremely morally questionable, {{Batman Gambit}}s going on. Now, their operations are routinely foiled by Julian Bashir and his allies. In fact, despite Bashir ruining several of their master plans, Section 31 remains absolutely obsessed with recruiting him to the extent that it borders on StalkerWithACrush territory. They're portrayed as so incompetent at their mission of protecting the Federation that they fail to prevent [[spoiler: the assassination of President Nanietta Bacco]] but also [[spoiler: don't know that her successor is a Cardassian mole.]] It seems David Mack realized this and ''Literature/StarTrekSection31Control'' undid this, [[TheBadGuyWins hard]]. [[spoiler:All those failures? The AI controlling Section 31 planned for them and recruited Bashir to help take down the agency.]]

to:

* Section 31 in the Franchise/StarTrekNovelVerse has been getting hit hard with this lately. In their original television appearances, Section 31 agents could dance circles around other foreign intelligence services and had some truly devious, if extremely morally questionable, {{Batman Gambit}}s going on. Now, their operations are routinely foiled by Julian Bashir and his allies. In fact, despite Bashir ruining several of their master plans, Section 31 remains absolutely obsessed with recruiting him to the extent that it borders on StalkerWithACrush territory. They're portrayed as so incompetent at their mission of protecting the Federation that they fail to prevent [[spoiler: the [[spoiler:the assassination of President Nanietta Bacco]] but also [[spoiler: don't [[spoiler:don't know that her successor is a Cardassian mole.]] It seems David Mack realized this and ''Literature/StarTrekSection31Control'' undid this, [[TheBadGuyWins hard]]. [[spoiler:All those failures? The AI controlling Section 31 planned for them and recruited Bashir to help take down the agency.]]



* In the final book of ''Literature/TheDarkTower'' series, [[{{Archenemy}} Walter o'Dim/Randall Flagg]] and the [[BigBad Crimson King]], the two main villains up until that point, are reduced to almost non-entities. In particular Flagg, who had once been considered King's 'ubervillain', is easily dispatched in one chapter by a newly introduced character, who finds him pathetic. This is especially troublesome to some fans, since Flagg has been especially troublesome to numerous Creator/StephenKing characters over the years, even surviving (or, more accurately, respawning after) a nuclear blast. Having Mordred kill him is obviously to establish Mordred as even more sinister and dangerous than Flagg, but that's a bit hard, if not impossible, after developing the Flagg character for decades and across numerous books. Made worse by the fact that Mordred's death is very anticlimactic (weakened by food poisoning due to eating the disease-ridden corpse of Lippy the horse, Roland kills him with one shot).

to:

* In the final book of ''Literature/TheDarkTower'' series, [[{{Archenemy}} Walter o'Dim/Randall Flagg]] and the [[BigBad Crimson King]], the two main villains up until that point, are reduced to almost non-entities. In particular Flagg, who had once been considered King's 'ubervillain', is easily dispatched in one chapter by a newly introduced character, who finds him pathetic. This is especially troublesome to some fans, since Flagg has been especially troublesome to numerous Creator/StephenKing characters over the years, even surviving (or, more accurately, respawning after) a nuclear blast. Having Mordred kill him is obviously to establish Mordred as even more sinister and dangerous than Flagg, but that's a bit hard, if not impossible, after developing the Flagg character for decades and across numerous books. Made worse by the fact that Mordred's death is very anticlimactic (weakened by food poisoning due to eating the disease-ridden corpse of Lippy the horse, Roland kills him with one shot).shot).
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* Section 31 in the Franchise/StarTrekNovelVerse has been getting hit hard with this lately. In their original television appearances, Section 31 agents could dance circles around other foreign intelligence services and had some truly devious, if extremely morally questionable, {{Batman Gambit}}s going on. Now, their operations are routinely foiled by Julian Bashir and his allies. In fact, despite Bashir ruining several of their master plans, Section 31 remains absolutely obsessed with recruiting him to the extent that it borders on StalkerWithACrush territory. They're portrayed as so incompetent at their mission of protecting the Federation that they fail to prevent [[spoiler: the assassination of President Nanietta Bacco]] but also [[spoiler: don't know that her successor is a Cardassian mole.]]

to:

* Section 31 in the Franchise/StarTrekNovelVerse has been getting hit hard with this lately. In their original television appearances, Section 31 agents could dance circles around other foreign intelligence services and had some truly devious, if extremely morally questionable, {{Batman Gambit}}s going on. Now, their operations are routinely foiled by Julian Bashir and his allies. In fact, despite Bashir ruining several of their master plans, Section 31 remains absolutely obsessed with recruiting him to the extent that it borders on StalkerWithACrush territory. They're portrayed as so incompetent at their mission of protecting the Federation that they fail to prevent [[spoiler: the assassination of President Nanietta Bacco]] but also [[spoiler: don't know that her successor is a Cardassian mole.]] It seems David Mack realized this and ''Literature/StarTrekSection31Control'' undid this, [[TheBadGuyWins hard]]. [[spoiler:All those failures? The AI controlling Section 31 planned for them and recruited Bashir to help take down the agency.]]


* Section 31 in the Franchise/StarTrekNovelVerse has been getting hit hard with this lately. In their original television appearances, Section 31 agents could dance circles around other foreign intelligence services and had some truly devious, if extremely morally questionable, BatmanGambits going on. Now, their operations are routinely foiled by Julian Bashir and his allies. In fact, despite Bashir ruining several of their master plans, Section 31 remains absolutely obsessed with recruiting him to the extent that it borders on StalkerWithACrush territory. They're portrayed as so incompetent at their mission of protecting the Federation that they fail to prevent [[spoiler: the assassination of President Nanietta Bacco]] but also [[spoiler: don't know that her successor is a Cardassian mole.]]

to:

* Section 31 in the Franchise/StarTrekNovelVerse has been getting hit hard with this lately. In their original television appearances, Section 31 agents could dance circles around other foreign intelligence services and had some truly devious, if extremely morally questionable, BatmanGambits {{Batman Gambit}}s going on. Now, their operations are routinely foiled by Julian Bashir and his allies. In fact, despite Bashir ruining several of their master plans, Section 31 remains absolutely obsessed with recruiting him to the extent that it borders on StalkerWithACrush territory. They're portrayed as so incompetent at their mission of protecting the Federation that they fail to prevent [[spoiler: the assassination of President Nanietta Bacco]] but also [[spoiler: don't know that her successor is a Cardassian mole.]]


* For a slightly less deadly kind of enemy, by the last ''Bridget Jones'' book, the arch cad and menace to happy relationships Daniel Cleaver has been demoted to eccentric friend who babysit's Bridget's children.

to:

* For a slightly less deadly kind of enemy, by the last ''Bridget Jones'' book, the arch cad and menace to happy relationships Daniel Cleaver has been demoted to eccentric friend who babysit's Bridget's children.children.
* In the final book of ''Literature/TheDarkTower'' series, [[{{Archenemy}} Walter o'Dim/Randall Flagg]] and the [[BigBad Crimson King]], the two main villains up until that point, are reduced to almost non-entities. In particular Flagg, who had once been considered King's 'ubervillain', is easily dispatched in one chapter by a newly introduced character, who finds him pathetic. This is especially troublesome to some fans, since Flagg has been especially troublesome to numerous Creator/StephenKing characters over the years, even surviving (or, more accurately, respawning after) a nuclear blast. Having Mordred kill him is obviously to establish Mordred as even more sinister and dangerous than Flagg, but that's a bit hard, if not impossible, after developing the Flagg character for decades and across numerous books. Made worse by the fact that Mordred's death is very anticlimactic (weakened by food poisoning due to eating the disease-ridden corpse of Lippy the horse, Roland kills him with one shot).

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** One consistent theme is that while the ''power'' of evil drops, the actual ''threat'' remains constant as far as Middle Earth is concerned. The Valar, Mair, and Elves retreat across the sea over time, leaving only the few free Men and the Hobbits to make the last stand with only a single Wizard supporting them.

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