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** In [=KQVI=] Alexander can be turned into a monster by beast's curse, or thrown into a castle jell cell. Neither of these get the standard "ghost alexander in underworld" scene but get their own unique artworks instead, however otherwise it leads to a standard 'death ending' pun message with restore/restart choices.

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** In [=KQVI=] ''[=KQVI=]'' Alexander can be turned into a monster by beast's curse, or thrown into a castle jell cell. Neither of these get the standard "ghost alexander in underworld" scene but get their own unique artworks instead, however otherwise it leads to a standard 'death ending' pun message with restore/restart choices.


** In ''[=KQV=]]'' ignoring obvious instantaneous deaths, Graham can be trapped in the desert temple, can be turned into a frog, captured by the thieves in the inn, thrown into a dank prison cell with no escape. But each of these lead to standard game over screens (with a related pun). In the NES version Icebella can lock Graham up in her dungeons if he doesn't please her with the Harp (censoring more blatant death in the pc versions).

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** In ''[=KQV=]]'' ''[=KQV=]'' ignoring obvious instantaneous deaths, Graham can be trapped in the desert temple, can be turned into a frog, captured by the thieves in the inn, thrown into a dank prison cell with no escape. But each of these lead to standard game over screens (with a related pun). In the NES version Icebella can lock Graham up in her dungeons if he doesn't please her with the Harp (censoring more blatant death in the pc versions).


** In ''[[=KQ1=]], in the AGI version Graham will get tossed into a cage in the witch's house with implication he'll become her dinner in the not so distant future. The leprechauns can capture Graham and arrest him for the rest of his life. Both of these lead to standard game over screens though (with the remake adding puns to the game-over screen).

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** In ''[[=KQ1=]], ''[=KQ1=], in the AGI version Graham will get tossed into a cage in the witch's house with implication he'll become her dinner in the not so distant future. The leprechauns can capture Graham and arrest him for the rest of his life. Both of these lead to standard game over screens though (with the remake adding puns to the game-over screen).


** In ''[=KQ1=]], in the AGI version Graham will get tossed into a cage in the witch's house with implication he'll become her dinner in the not so distant future. The leprechauns can capture Graham and arrest him for the rest of his life. Both of these lead to standard game over screens though (with the remake adding puns to the game-over screen).

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** In ''[=KQ1=]], ''[[=KQ1=]], in the AGI version Graham will get tossed into a cage in the witch's house with implication he'll become her dinner in the not so distant future. The leprechauns can capture Graham and arrest him for the rest of his life. Both of these lead to standard game over screens though (with the remake adding puns to the game-over screen).

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* NoOSHACompliance: Staircases in this series are very unsafe. You can easily fall to your death because of the absence of guard rails.


The first game tells the story of Sir Graham, an adventurer who sets out to recover three legendary lost artifacts of the kingdom of Daventry in order to win the crown of the dying king. Gameplay involved typing commands to perform such tasks as GET CARROT and GET {{FOUR LEAF CLOVER}}, not to mention OPEN DOOR (or SWIM...). Latter games involve his quest to rescue a princess and the adventures of the family that inevitably results from this rescue. Games 5-7 move to a point and click interface, while 8 maintains a point and click interface, it is a three-dimensional adventure (with RPG elements)

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The first game tells the story of Sir Graham, an adventurer who sets out to recover three legendary lost artifacts of the kingdom of Daventry in order to win the crown of the dying king. Gameplay involved typing commands to perform such tasks as GET CARROT and GET {{FOUR FOUR LEAF CLOVER}}, CLOVER, not to mention OPEN DOOR (or SWIM...). Latter games involve his quest to rescue a princess and the adventures of the family that inevitably results from this rescue. Games 5-7 move to a point and click interface, while 8 maintains a point and click interface, it is a three-dimensional adventure (with RPG elements)


* DoubleMeaningTitle: Whereas the franchise name becomes a ProtagonistTitle in the second and fifth installments, and veers into an ArtifactTitle in others,[[note]]Despite each installment connecting to the Royal House of Daventry in some way.[[/note]] this installment is named as such because King Edward is the one that issues the quest to Sir Graham. This is also the quest to prove Graham's worthiness of ''[[AwesomeMomentOfCrowning becoming]]'' the King of Daventry.

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* DoubleMeaningTitle: Whereas the franchise name becomes a ProtagonistTitle in the second and fifth installments, and veers into an ArtifactTitle in others,[[note]]Despite each installment connecting to the Royal House of Daventry in some way.[[/note]] this the first installment is named as such because King Edward is the one that issues the quest to Sir Graham. This is also the quest to prove Graham's worthiness of ''[[AwesomeMomentOfCrowning becoming]]'' the King of Daventry.

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* DoubleMeaningTitle: Whereas the franchise name becomes a ProtagonistTitle in the second and fifth installments, and veers into an ArtifactTitle in others,[[note]]Despite each installment connecting to the Royal House of Daventry in some way.[[/note]] this installment is named as such because King Edward is the one that issues the quest to Sir Graham. This is also the quest to prove Graham's worthiness of ''[[AwesomeMomentOfCrowning becoming]]'' the King of Daventry.


* GenreSavvy: If you know your way around fairy tales and myths, you'll have a much easier time solving many of the games' puzzles. Important caveat: villains are sometimes quite savvy themselves, and many fairy tale tropes are played with in different manners, so you may find out [[WrongGenreSavvy it's the wrong genre after all]]. In this case, be sure to HaveANiceDeath.

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* MistakenForThief: In one of the games, Alexander visits the Green Isles, which have become isolated due to each population suspecting another island's population has stolen from them. The real culprit was an evil character named Abdul Alhazred, who took them to sow discord and become king.


** In ''[=KQIII=]'', making a mistake while spell-casting has some humorous results.
** In ''[=KQIV=]'', failing to return to Daventry within 24 in-game hours.
** In ''[=KQV=]'', getting trapped in the desert palace.

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** Every single game has ways of dieing, captured, transforming, often many different ways.
** In ''[=KQ1=]], in the AGI version Graham will get tossed into a cage in the witch's house with implication he'll become her dinner in the not so distant future. The leprechauns can capture Graham and arrest him for the rest of his life. Both of these lead to standard game over screens though (with the remake adding puns to the game-over screen).
** In ''[=KQII=]'' you can be turned into a frog or return home without Valanice, although this leads to a standard game over screen like every other 'death', but you do at least get an extra scene if you leave without Valanice of him returning to his castle.
** In ''[=KQIII=]'', making a mistake while spell-casting has some humorous results.
results (some deadly, some transformations), getting stuck in Llewdor by missing the boat, or taken away from Daventry to be enslaved by the pirates. Each of these ultimately end in a standard game over screen however (after the initial description).
** In ''[=KQIV=]'', failing to return to Daventry within 24 in-game hours.
** In ''[=KQV=]'',
hours, getting married to Edgar, or returning without the fruit. With the exception of the latter, the first two lead to the standard game over screen however.
** In ''[=KQV=]]'' ignoring obvious instantaneous deaths, Graham can be
trapped in the desert palace.temple, can be turned into a frog, captured by the thieves in the inn, thrown into a dank prison cell with no escape. But each of these lead to standard game over screens (with a related pun). In the NES version Icebella can lock Graham up in her dungeons if he doesn't please her with the Harp (censoring more blatant death in the pc versions).
**In [=KQVI=] Alexander can be turned into a monster by beast's curse, or thrown into a castle jell cell. Neither of these get the standard "ghost alexander in underworld" scene but get their own unique artworks instead, however otherwise it leads to a standard 'death ending' pun message with restore/restart choices.


** ''[=KQ4=]'' changed the artwork to something more realistic and less cartoony. One anecdote mentioned that fans, upon seeing the intro, left the theatre crying. Some consider the game to be darker than previous games because of its topic of 'death and dying' of a major character, and some of the creepy regions that Rosella has to pass through to save her father and Genesta. The King's Quest Companion pointed out this 'change in tone' (as it saw it), and even tried to tie Tamir into the H.P. Lovecraft Mythos (with ideas of zombies, mummies, dholes, fishmen, Innsmouth, and night gaunts/goons). A fishman (righout of Creature of the Black Lagoon, and likely inspiring the Innsmouth fishmen references in the Companion) actually can be encountered in the swamp. When day turns to night the land becomes a lot more dark and sinister especially around the old manor house and graveyards, and tomb. The game was given a very dark and bleak live action advertisement in which actress playing Rosella is exploring troll cave, and is captured and dragged off into the cave by a fear inducing troll (JumpScare). This and a couple of other sequences gives the game somewhat of an early SurvivalHorror feel.

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** ''[=KQ4=]'' changed the artwork to something more realistic and less cartoony.cartoony (at least seemingly, the AGI version looks pretty much like the earlier AGI games, but the new EGA gave it more of a 'story book' look, and the game is still largely sunny and bright, at least during the day). One anecdote mentioned that fans, upon seeing the intro, left the theatre crying. Some consider the game to be darker than previous games because of its topic of 'death and dying' of a major character, and some of the creepy regions that Rosella has to pass through to save her father and Genesta. The King's Quest Companion pointed out this 'change in tone' (as it saw it), and even tried to tie Tamir into the H.P. Lovecraft Mythos (with ideas of zombies, mummies, dholes, fishmen, Innsmouth, and night gaunts/goons). A fishman (righout of Creature of the Black Lagoon, and likely inspiring the Innsmouth fishmen references in the Companion) actually can be encountered in the swamp. When day turns to night the land becomes a lot more dark and sinister especially around the old manor house and graveyards, and tomb. The game was given a very dark and bleak live action advertisement in which actress playing Rosella is exploring troll cave, and is captured and dragged off into the cave by a fear inducing troll (JumpScare). This and a couple of other sequences gives the game somewhat of an early SurvivalHorror feel.


** Though ''[=KQ2=]'' can be seen as largely a continuation of ''[=KQ1=]'' in style of puzzles and design, it's often noted that the world it takes place in is a darker and lonelier land, ruled by vampires, ghouls, ghosts, and a witch. The 'former?' The princess of the land was kidnapped by the Witch, and locked away in a tower in another land. Even the name Kolyma is a reference to a bleak region of Siberia. Perhaps, though, it is best described as a land of contrasts in that it's a sunny place during the day, and turns into a very dark place at night (this is represented by the third key sequence to confront Dracula in his castle, though there is not really any day and night mechanic in the game). Graham even begins the story with a prophecy by the ghost of the former king, stating that if he doesn't find a queen soon, he will end up cursed like the former king (shades of ''Hamlet'', without the murder) to die without an heir and the kingdom to fall into ruin. The Companion noted this addition of darker and more isolated feelings and ideas, and expanded upon the role of the monks as the only protectors in the land, trying to keep evil at bay.

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** Though ''[=KQ2=]'' can be seen as largely a continuation of ''[=KQ1=]'' in style of puzzles and design, it's often noted that the world it takes place in is a darker and lonelier land, ruled by vampires, ghouls, ghosts, and a witch. The 'former?' The princess of the land was kidnapped by the Witch, and locked away in a tower in another land. Even the name Kolyma is a reference to a bleak region of Siberia. Perhaps, though, it is best described as a land of contrasts in that it's a sunny place during the day, and turns into a very dark place at night (this is represented by the third key sequence to confront Dracula in his castle, though there is not really any day and night mechanic in the game). Graham even begins the story with a prophecy by the ghost of the former king, stating that if he doesn't find a queen soon, he will end up cursed like the former king (shades of ''Hamlet'', without the murder) to die without an heir and the kingdom to fall into ruin. The Companion noted this addition of darker and more isolated feelings and ideas, and expanded upon the role of the monks as the only protectors in the land, trying to keep evil at bay.


** Justified and averted in ''Mask of Eternity'' (at least according to the some of the information the world has been hit by a 'cataclysm' which has changed things, and according to the Ice Queen, what you see on the map, is apparently literally the 'edge of the world' at this time), though. At least the Daventry portion of it. Most of the game takes place in a town in Daventry, which was referenced or alluded to in the early games and the King's Quest Companion but never shown. The town or towns of Daventry were more prominently used in two of the King's Quest novels. ''[=KQ8=]'' like previous games takes place mostly in new lands never seen in previous games, including a second Land of the Dead. According to the "Guidebook to the Land of the Green Isles" (KQ6 Manual) there maybe as many Lands of the Dead as there are legends in the world to various cultures and people.

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** Justified and averted in ''Mask of Eternity'' (at least according to the some of the information the world has been hit by a 'cataclysm' which has changed things, and according to the Ice Queen, what you see on the map, is apparently literally the 'edge of the world' at this time), though. At least the Daventry portion of it. Most of the game takes place in a town in Daventry, which was referenced or alluded to in the early games and the King's Quest Companion but never shown. The town or towns of Daventry were more prominently used in two of the King's Quest novels. ''[=KQ8=]'' '' [=KQ8=]'' like previous games takes place mostly in new lands never seen in previous games, including games.
**Justified and averted in both KQ6 manual, KQ8 has
a second Land of the Dead. According to the "Guidebook to the Land of the Green Isles" (KQ6 Manual) there maybe as many Lands of the Dead as there are legends in the world to various cultures and people.


** JustifiedTrope in ''VideoGame/KingsQuest2015'' because of the narrative fashion of the game. Graham is retelling his past adventures to his grandchild Gwendolyn, so not everything [[UnreliableNarrator might be accurate]]. Then again external material (see website and press releases) claims that these stories are the 'true stories' whereas the original series are just 'legends' in the new series' own 'canon'. The present and chapter 6: Epilogue at least confirm some architecture of the castle (from flashbacks), and the general geography of the Daventry (while introducing yet a new location in Daventry). The developers claim that the reboot takes place in a separate universe (and that original games are only 'fairy tales' in that universe, rather than the 'truth'). The world itself is very different than in past games with Llewdor lieing to the 'far north', Tanalore and Avalon lieing to the south, and Kolyma/Enchanted Isles completely reimagined.

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** JustifiedTrope in ''VideoGame/KingsQuest2015'' because of the narrative fashion of the game. Graham is retelling his past adventures to his grandchild Gwendolyn, so not everything [[UnreliableNarrator might be accurate]]. Then again external material (see website and press releases) claims that these stories are the 'true stories' whereas the original series are just 'legends' in the new series' own 'canon'. The present and chapter 6: Epilogue at least confirm some architecture of the castle (from flashbacks), and the general geography of the Daventry (while introducing yet a new location in Daventry). The developers claim that the reboot takes place in a separate universe (and that original games are only 'fairy tales' in that universe, rather than the 'truth'). The world itself is very different than in past games with Llewdor lieing to the 'far north', the land of Tanalore and Avalon lieing to the south, south (rather than Tanalore being a continent to the west, and Avalon being an island), and Kolyma/Enchanted Isles completely reimagined.

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