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Yeah, that's pretty much it. It barely rises above the level of ExcusePlot, but considering it was essentially the first to even try to on a console, as it was first released in 1986, it was incredibly groundbreaking at the time, being essentially the first console [[RolePlayingGame RPG]].

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Yeah, that's pretty much it. It barely rises above the level of ExcusePlot, but considering it was essentially the first to even try to on a console, as it was first released in 1986, it was incredibly groundbreaking at the time, being essentially the first console [[RolePlayingGame RPG]].
[[EasternRPG JRPG]].

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* CuteSlimeMook: The slimes are the TropeMaker.


* TheBigDamnKiss: Princess Laura shares one with the hero after he saves her from the dragon.

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* TheBigDamnKiss: Princess Laura Gwaelin/Laura shares one with the hero after he saves her from the dragon.


** The basic damage spell in the NES version is called HURT. It hurts enemies. The stronger version is called HURTMORE. It hurts enemies more. Similarly, there's HEAL and HEALMORE.

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** The basic damage spell in the NES version is called HURT. It hurts enemies. The stronger version is called HURTMORE. It hurts enemies more. Similarly, there's HEAL and HEALMORE.HEALMORE; you can probably guess what they do.


** The basic damage spell in the NES version is called HURT. It hurts enemies. The stronger version is called HURTMORE. It hurts enemies more.

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** The basic damage spell in the NES version is called HURT. It hurts enemies. The stronger version is called HURTMORE. It hurts enemies more. Similarly, there's HEAL and HEALMORE.

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* PressXToDie: When the [[BigBad Dragonlord]] tells you WeCanRuleTogether, you actually can take him up on his offer. This results in him calling you a "pitiful fool," and you instantly lose the game.


* MetalSlime: The {{Trope Namer|s}}, also the Goldman/Gold Golem.
* MoneySpider: That the Goldman/Gold Golem gives a lot of wealth upon defeat makes sense. That it's [[FridgeLogic all in coinage does not.]] Everything else also drops coins.
* MultipleEndings: There's one [[NonStandardGameOver bad ending]] ([[spoiler:try to join the Dragonlord]]) and [[OlderThanTheyThink three good endings]]: save the princess and return her to the King before defeating the Dragonlord, return the princess after defeating the Dragonlord, or don't save the princess. The (minimalist) end game cut scene varies a bit for each ending. In the last one, [[CuttingOffTheBranches the hero travels off to far-off lands alone]].

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* MetalSlime: The {{Trope Namer|s}}, trope namer. There's also the Goldman/Gold Golem.
* MoneySpider: That the Goldman/Gold Golem gives a lot of wealth upon defeat makes sense. That it's [[FridgeLogic all in coinage does not.]] not. Everything else also drops coins.
* MultipleEndings: There's one [[NonStandardGameOver bad ending]] ([[spoiler:try to join the Dragonlord]]) and [[OlderThanTheyThink three good endings]]: endings: save the princess and return her to the King before defeating the Dragonlord, return the princess after defeating the Dragonlord, or don't save the princess. The (minimalist) end game cut scene varies a bit for each ending. In the last one, [[CuttingOffTheBranches the hero travels off to far-off lands alone]].



* UrbanLegendOfZelda: A rumor persists that the "Dragonlord's true form" twist was actually a {{Woolseyism}} done for the American version. The rumor goes that in Japanese he allegedly has his pet dragon come to avenge his master. Enix supposedly liked the American change better - so they incorporated it into the remakes. This however is untrue. The original Famicom version states 'りゅうおうが しょうたいを あらわした!'- which translates roughly to 'The dragon lord has revealed his true form'. No version of the game ever states anything about a pet.

Added DiffLines:

* UrbanLegendOfZelda: A rumor persists that the "Dragonlord's true form" twist was actually a {{Woolseyism}} done for the American version. The rumor goes that in Japanese he allegedly has his pet dragon come to avenge his master. Enix supposedly liked the American change better - so they incorporated it into the remakes. This however is untrue. The original Famicom version states 'りゅうおうが しょうたいを あらわした!'- which translates roughly to 'The dragon lord has revealed his true form'. No version of the game ever states anything about a pet.


* ForcedLevelGrinding: If there wasn't any in this game, you'd likely be able to beat it in half an hour. For example, people have run thousands of simulations on emulators, and determined that the Dragonlord is completely impossible to defeat at level 17 or below in the NES version, since you absolutely ''must'' have Healmore to stand a chance against the Dragonlord's dragon form. However, with a tool-assisted run, manipulating luck beyond reasonable means, [[http://tasvideos.org/1482M.html the game can be completed at level 7.]] Even more astonishingly, this has also been accomplished ''by humans'' now[[note]]Level 7 is the ''absolute'' lowest level: you ''must'' have the Sleep spell in order to prevent certain enemies from attacking, by messing up their AIRoulette, whether it's a TAS run or the awesome non-assisted run. Otherwise, their attacks will devastate you in short order[[/note]].

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* ForcedLevelGrinding: If there wasn't any in this game, you'd likely be able to beat it in half an hour. For example, people have run thousands of simulations on emulators, and determined that the Dragonlord is completely impossible to defeat at level 17 or below in the NES version, since you absolutely ''must'' have Healmore to stand a chance against the Dragonlord's dragon form. However, with a tool-assisted run, manipulating luck beyond reasonable means, [[http://tasvideos.org/1482M.html the game can be completed at level 7.]] Even more astonishingly, this has also been accomplished ''by humans'' now[[note]]Level now.[[note]]Level 7 is the ''absolute'' lowest level: you ''must'' have the Sleep spell in order to prevent certain enemies from attacking, by messing up their AIRoulette, whether it's a TAS run or the awesome non-assisted run. Otherwise, their attacks will devastate you in short order[[/note]].order.[[/note]]



* InfinityMinusOneSword: Does thou hath thy gold?

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* InfinityMinusOneSword: Does thou hath thy gold?InfinityMinusOneSword:



* InfinityPlusOneSword: Can thou find thy gear?
** Erdrick's Sword. A +40 Attack bonus! A 12 point difference indeed and highly recommended for dealing with the absurdly powerful monsters before reaching the Dragonlord himself[[note]]However, even with the sword, doing more than 10 points of damage to the Dragonlord's final form is difficult at best[[/note]].
** Erdrick's Armor. A +28 bonus to armor. Same properties as Magic Armor, but with 4x HealingFactor (1 HitPoint per step) and 1/3 resistances against fire breath. Additional bonuses include immunity to all terrain damage tiles AND STOPSPELL!
* LevelCap: You stop learning new spells at level 20, but the additional experience for each new level doesn't change. You can gain levels faster and faster as your stats rise until you hit the cap. Given that you can beat the Dragonlord at level 19 (with some luck), anything beyond about level 25 is overkill anyway. If you reach the level cap of 30 in the NES version, the king will ask why you haven't yet slain the Dragonlord.

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* InfinityPlusOneSword: Can thou find thy gear?
InfinityPlusOneSword:
** Erdrick's Sword. A +40 Attack bonus! A 12 point difference indeed and highly recommended for dealing with the absurdly powerful monsters before reaching the Dragonlord himself[[note]]However, himself.[[note]]However, even with the sword, doing more than 10 points of damage to the Dragonlord's final form is difficult at best[[/note]].
best.[[/note]]
** Erdrick's Armor. A +28 bonus to armor. Same properties as Magic Armor, but with 4x HealingFactor (1 HitPoint per step) and 1/3 resistances against fire breath. Additional bonuses include immunity to all terrain damage tiles AND STOPSPELL!
''and'' STOPSPELL.
* LevelCap: You stop learning new spells at level 20, but the additional experience for each new level doesn't change. You can gain levels faster and faster as your stats rise until you hit the cap. Given that you can beat the Dragonlord at level 19 (with 19, with some luck), luck, anything beyond about level 25 is overkill anyway. If you reach the level cap of 30 in the NES version, the king will ask why you haven't yet slain the Dragonlord.



* LuckBasedMission: Thou art unlucky if thou encounter thy unlucky encounters:

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* LuckBasedMission: Thou art unlucky if thou encounter thy unlucky encounters:



** Demon Knights due to having a absurdly high evasion rate. '''It is dodging''' indeed.

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** Demon Knights due to having a absurdly high evasion rate. '''It ''It is dodging''' dodging'' indeed.


** Erdrick's Sword. A +40 Attack bonus! A 12 point difference indeed and highly recommended for dealing with the absurdly powerful monsters before reaching the Dragonlord himself.

to:

** Erdrick's Sword. A +40 Attack bonus! A 12 point difference indeed and highly recommended for dealing with the absurdly powerful monsters before reaching the Dragonlord himself.himself[[note]]However, even with the sword, doing more than 10 points of damage to the Dragonlord's final form is difficult at best[[/note]].


* ForcedLevelGrinding: If there wasn't any in this game, you'd likely be able to beat it in half an hour. For example, people have run thousands of simulations on emulators, and determined that the Dragonlord is completely impossible to defeat at level 17 or below in the NES version, since you absolutely ''must'' have Healmore to stand a chance against the Dragonlord's dragon form. However, with a tool-assisted run, manipulating luck beyond reasonable means, [[http://tasvideos.org/1482M.html the game can be completed at level 7.]] Even more astonishingly, this has also been accomplished ''by humans'' now.

to:

* ForcedLevelGrinding: If there wasn't any in this game, you'd likely be able to beat it in half an hour. For example, people have run thousands of simulations on emulators, and determined that the Dragonlord is completely impossible to defeat at level 17 or below in the NES version, since you absolutely ''must'' have Healmore to stand a chance against the Dragonlord's dragon form. However, with a tool-assisted run, manipulating luck beyond reasonable means, [[http://tasvideos.org/1482M.html the game can be completed at level 7.]] Even more astonishingly, this has also been accomplished ''by humans'' now.now[[note]]Level 7 is the ''absolute'' lowest level: you ''must'' have the Sleep spell in order to prevent certain enemies from attacking, by messing up their AIRoulette, whether it's a TAS run or the awesome non-assisted run. Otherwise, their attacks will devastate you in short order[[/note]].


----
!!This game has the TropeNamers for:

* ButThouMust
* MetalSlime


* DubNameChange: In the NES version Loto was renamed "Erdrick", Lars was renamed "Lorik", Dracolord was renamed as "The Dragonlord", and Lora was renamed "Gwaelin". Furthermore, Radatome was renamed "Tantegel", and several other towns were renamed as well (such as Mercado becoming "Cantlin"). Later versions of the game, as well as fan translations, went a little back and forth on keeping the altered names, going back to originals, or coming up with ''further'' alterations, although the most recent smartphone version, as well as ''Dragon Quest Builders'' (which uses the same setting) retains all of the NES names.

to:

* DubNameChange: In the NES version version, Loto was renamed "Erdrick", Lars was renamed "Lorik", Dracolord was renamed as "The Dragonlord", and Lora was renamed "Gwaelin". Furthermore, Radatome was renamed "Tantegel", and several other towns were renamed as well (such as Mercado becoming "Cantlin"). Later versions of the game, as well as fan translations, went a little back and forth on keeping the altered names, going back to originals, or coming up with ''further'' alterations, although the most recent smartphone version, as well as ''Dragon Quest Builders'' (which uses the same setting) retains all of the NES names.


* DubNameChange: In the NES version Loto was renamed "Erdrick", Lars was renamed "Lorik", Dracolord was renamed as "The Dragonlord", and Lora was renamed "Gwaelin". Furthermore, Radatome was renamed "Tantegel", and several other towns were renamed as well (such as Mercado becoming "Cantlin"). Later versions of the game, as well as fan translations, went a little back and forth on keeping the altered names, going back to originals, or coming up with ''further'' alterations, although the most recent smartphone version retains all of the NES names.

to:

* DubNameChange: In the NES version Loto was renamed "Erdrick", Lars was renamed "Lorik", Dracolord was renamed as "The Dragonlord", and Lora was renamed "Gwaelin". Furthermore, Radatome was renamed "Tantegel", and several other towns were renamed as well (such as Mercado becoming "Cantlin"). Later versions of the game, as well as fan translations, went a little back and forth on keeping the altered names, going back to originals, or coming up with ''further'' alterations, although the most recent smartphone version version, as well as ''Dragon Quest Builders'' (which uses the same setting) retains all of the NES names.


The game's release history is absolutely enormous - in Japan. In the '80s and '90s it was ported to virtually every platform imaginable - the {{UsefulNotes/MSX}}, the UsefulNotes/PC98, the UsefulNotes/SharpX68000, the Super Famicom, and ''{{UsefulNotes/Satellaview}}''... the SFC port is notable, however, for introducing some significant graphical and performance updates to the game. North America never saw any of this; when a UsefulNotes/GameBoyColor port was produced in 1999, North America received it a year later... and then that was ''it'', despite a feature-phone version coming out in 2004 and the entire Loto trilogy getting a multi-version port archive release on the Wii in 2011. In 2013, a SFC-based smartphone version was produced (it's visuals however were further updated and resemble those of the SNES remake of ''VideoGame/DragonQuestIII''), and this was released to the wider English-speaking world with an updated translation.

to:

The game's release history is absolutely enormous - in Japan. In the '80s and '90s it was ported to virtually every platform imaginable - the {{UsefulNotes/MSX}}, the UsefulNotes/PC98, the UsefulNotes/SharpX68000, the Super Famicom, and ''{{UsefulNotes/Satellaview}}''... the SFC port is notable, however, for introducing some significant graphical and performance updates to the game. North America never saw any of this; when a UsefulNotes/GameBoyColor port was produced in 1999, North America received it a year later... and then that was ''it'', despite a feature-phone version coming out in 2004 and the entire Loto trilogy getting a multi-version port archive release on the Wii in 2011. In 2013, a SFC-based smartphone version was produced (it's visuals however (its visuals, however, were further updated and resemble those of the SNES remake of ''VideoGame/DragonQuestIII''), and this was released to the wider English-speaking world with an updated translation.

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