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The Cup itself is named for Lord Frederick Stanley (later the [[UsefulNotes/KnightFever 16th Earl of Derby]]), the [[UsefulNotes/CanadianPolitics Governor-General of Canada]] who was instrumental in organizing Canadian hockey and donated the original Cup in 1892. Originally a silver punch bowl made in [[OopNorth Sheffield]] and purchased for [[UsefulNotes/OldBritishMoney ten guineas]] (on the order of $1200-$1300 in today's dollars, the trophy has been through a lot of incredible stories, especially for a trophy.[[note]](Some of these stories apply to the original, others apply to the newer one, and others to both.)[[/note]] This is in no large part due to the unofficial tradition of each member of the winning team getting a day to spend with the trophy (most will simply take it to their hometown for photo-ops at local schools). It's shared a bed with countless players, been set on fire, gone clubbing with Mark Messier, been used to baptize infants, attended pool parties with the winning team ([[MemeticMutation the trophy, it turns out, does not float]]), marched in a gay pride parade, been driven around at 200mph by Mario Andretti on the eve of the Indy 500, and been [[GrailInTheGarbage lost on the side of the road]]. It was also attacked by Taliban grenades in 2007 while visiting Canadian soldiers in Afghanistan. The damage it's sustained is fairly significant; multiple dings and dents from being kicked into a frozen river, bar-hopping with players, and [[NoodleIncident incidents players are presumably too embarrassed to discuss with the press]].

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The Cup itself is named for Lord Frederick Stanley (later the [[UsefulNotes/KnightFever 16th Earl of Derby]]), the [[UsefulNotes/CanadianPolitics Governor-General of Canada]] who was instrumental in organizing Canadian hockey and donated the original Cup in 1892. Originally a silver punch bowl made in [[OopNorth Sheffield]] and purchased for [[UsefulNotes/OldBritishMoney ten guineas]] (on the order of $1200-$1300 in today's dollars, dollars), the trophy has been through a lot of incredible stories, especially for a trophy.[[note]](Some of these stories apply to the original, others apply to the newer one, and others to both.)[[/note]] This is in no large part due to the unofficial tradition of each member of the winning team getting a day to spend with the trophy (most will simply take it to their hometown for photo-ops at local schools). It's shared a bed with countless players, been set on fire, gone clubbing with Mark Messier, been used to baptize infants, attended pool parties with the winning team ([[MemeticMutation the trophy, it turns out, does not float]]), marched in a gay pride parade, been driven around at 200mph by Mario Andretti on the eve of the Indy 500, and been [[GrailInTheGarbage lost on the side of the road]]. It was also attacked by Taliban grenades in 2007 while visiting Canadian soldiers in Afghanistan. The damage it's sustained is fairly significant; multiple dings and dents from being kicked into a frozen river, bar-hopping with players, and [[NoodleIncident incidents players are presumably too embarrassed to discuss with the press]].


The St. Louis Blues are the current Stanley Cup champions, winning it in 2019 for the first time in franchise history.

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The St. Louis Blues are the current Stanley Cup champions, winning it in 2019 for the first time in franchise history.
history. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic cancelling the 2019-2020 season midway through, as of this writing the Blues continue to hold the cup.


The Cup itself is named for Lord Frederick Stanley (later the [[UsefulNotes/KnightFever 16th Earl of Derby]]), the [[UsefulNotes/CanadianPolitics Governor-General of Canada]] who was instrumental in organizing Canadian hockey and donated the original Cup in 1892. Originally a silver punch bowl made in [[OopNorth Sheffield]] and purchased for [[UsefulNotes/OldBritishMoney ten guineas]] (on the order of $1200-$1300 in today's dollars[[note]]{Canadian or American, it's been years since there was a difference in value of more than a few cents between the two.}[[/note]]), the trophy has been through a lot of incredible stories, especially for a trophy.[[note]](Some of these stories apply to the original, others apply to the newer one, and others to both.)[[/note]] This is in no large part due to the unofficial tradition of each member of the winning team getting a day to spend with the trophy (most will simply take it to their hometown for photo-ops at local schools). It's shared a bed with countless players, been set on fire, gone clubbing with Mark Messier, been used to baptize infants, attended pool parties with the winning team ([[MemeticMutation the trophy, it turns out, does not float]]), marched in a gay pride parade, been driven around at 200mph by Mario Andretti on the eve of the Indy 500, and been [[GrailInTheGarbage lost on the side of the road]]. It was also attacked by Taliban grenades in 2007 while visiting Canadian soldiers in Afghanistan. The damage it's sustained is fairly significant; multiple dings and dents from being kicked into a frozen river, bar-hopping with players, and [[NoodleIncident incidents players are presumably too embarrassed to discuss with the press]].

to:

The Cup itself is named for Lord Frederick Stanley (later the [[UsefulNotes/KnightFever 16th Earl of Derby]]), the [[UsefulNotes/CanadianPolitics Governor-General of Canada]] who was instrumental in organizing Canadian hockey and donated the original Cup in 1892. Originally a silver punch bowl made in [[OopNorth Sheffield]] and purchased for [[UsefulNotes/OldBritishMoney ten guineas]] (on the order of $1200-$1300 in today's dollars[[note]]{Canadian or American, it's been years since there was a difference in value of more than a few cents between the two.}[[/note]]), dollars, the trophy has been through a lot of incredible stories, especially for a trophy.[[note]](Some of these stories apply to the original, others apply to the newer one, and others to both.)[[/note]] This is in no large part due to the unofficial tradition of each member of the winning team getting a day to spend with the trophy (most will simply take it to their hometown for photo-ops at local schools). It's shared a bed with countless players, been set on fire, gone clubbing with Mark Messier, been used to baptize infants, attended pool parties with the winning team ([[MemeticMutation the trophy, it turns out, does not float]]), marched in a gay pride parade, been driven around at 200mph by Mario Andretti on the eve of the Indy 500, and been [[GrailInTheGarbage lost on the side of the road]]. It was also attacked by Taliban grenades in 2007 while visiting Canadian soldiers in Afghanistan. The damage it's sustained is fairly significant; multiple dings and dents from being kicked into a frozen river, bar-hopping with players, and [[NoodleIncident incidents players are presumably too embarrassed to discuss with the press]].


The Cup itself is named for Lord Frederick Stanley (later the [[BlueBlood 16th Earl of Derby]]), the [[UsefulNotes/CanadianPolitics Governor-General of Canada]] who was instrumental in organizing Canadian hockey and donated the original Cup in 1892. Originally a silver punch bowl made in [[OopNorth Sheffield]] and purchased for [[UsefulNotes/OldBritishMoney ten guineas]] (on the order of $1200-$1300 in today's dollars[[note]]{Canadian or American, it's been years since there was a difference in value of more than a few cents between the two.}[[/note]]), the trophy has been through a lot of incredible stories, especially for a trophy.[[note]](Some of these stories apply to the original, others apply to the newer one, and others to both.)[[/note]] This is in no large part due to the unofficial tradition of each member of the winning team getting a day to spend with the trophy (most will simply take it to their hometown for photo-ops at local schools). It's shared a bed with countless players, been set on fire, gone clubbing with Mark Messier, been used to baptize infants, attended pool parties with the winning team ([[MemeticMutation the trophy, it turns out, does not float]]), marched in a gay pride parade, been driven around at 200mph by Mario Andretti on the eve of the Indy 500, and been [[GrailInTheGarbage lost on the side of the road]]. It was also attacked by Taliban grenades in 2007 while visiting Canadian soldiers in Afghanistan. The damage it's sustained is fairly significant; multiple dings and dents from being kicked into a frozen river, bar-hopping with players, and [[NoodleIncident incidents players are presumably too embarrassed to discuss with the press]].

to:

The Cup itself is named for Lord Frederick Stanley (later the [[BlueBlood [[UsefulNotes/KnightFever 16th Earl of Derby]]), the [[UsefulNotes/CanadianPolitics Governor-General of Canada]] who was instrumental in organizing Canadian hockey and donated the original Cup in 1892. Originally a silver punch bowl made in [[OopNorth Sheffield]] and purchased for [[UsefulNotes/OldBritishMoney ten guineas]] (on the order of $1200-$1300 in today's dollars[[note]]{Canadian or American, it's been years since there was a difference in value of more than a few cents between the two.}[[/note]]), the trophy has been through a lot of incredible stories, especially for a trophy.[[note]](Some of these stories apply to the original, others apply to the newer one, and others to both.)[[/note]] This is in no large part due to the unofficial tradition of each member of the winning team getting a day to spend with the trophy (most will simply take it to their hometown for photo-ops at local schools). It's shared a bed with countless players, been set on fire, gone clubbing with Mark Messier, been used to baptize infants, attended pool parties with the winning team ([[MemeticMutation the trophy, it turns out, does not float]]), marched in a gay pride parade, been driven around at 200mph by Mario Andretti on the eve of the Indy 500, and been [[GrailInTheGarbage lost on the side of the road]]. It was also attacked by Taliban grenades in 2007 while visiting Canadian soldiers in Afghanistan. The damage it's sustained is fairly significant; multiple dings and dents from being kicked into a frozen river, bar-hopping with players, and [[NoodleIncident incidents players are presumably too embarrassed to discuss with the press]].


* ''Series/BostonLegal'': The Cup (though likely a prop) appeared in an episode. Denny Crane (Creator/WilliamShatner) knocked it off a balcony. This was after attempting to engrave his own name into it alongside the 1970 Bruins - he claims to have loaned Bobby Orr his lucky jock strap for that Cup-winning game.

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* ''Series/BostonLegal'': The Cup (though likely a prop) appeared in an episode. Denny Crane (Creator/WilliamShatner) knocked it off a balcony. This was after attempting to engrave his own name into it alongside the 1970 Bruins - he claims to have loaned Bobby Orr UsefulNotes/BobbyOrr his lucky jock strap for that Cup-winning game.



** A couch gag has the Simpson family skating around their living room and celebrating with The Cup, along with Maggie sitting inside the bowl.
** In "The Last Temptation of Krust", Krusty drinks from the Cup going on a late night bender and then vomits. The NHL weren't amused, and sent a letter to the show...which a Fox lawyer told the show to ''ignore''.

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** A couch gag has the Simpson family skating around their living room and celebrating with The the Cup, along with Maggie sitting inside the bowl.
** In "The Last Temptation of Krust", Krusty drinks from the Cup going on a late night bender and then vomits. The NHL weren't amused, and sent a letter to the show... which a Fox lawyer told the show to ''ignore''.


Which, of course, leads to the question, "If there is only one single trophy, what happens when they run out of space on the Cup to engrave names?" Well, since 1991, when the size of the Cup was finally capped, each time they Cup runs out of space (once each 13 years or so), the top ring is removed, the ones underneath are moved up, and a new ring is added to the bottom. The removed ring is then stored in the Hockey Hall of Fame. The NHL takes the immortality of its winners ''very'' seriously.

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Which, of course, leads to the question, "If there is only one single trophy, what happens when they run out of space on the Cup to engrave names?" Well, since 1991, when the size of the Cup was finally capped, each time they the Cup runs out of space (once each 13 years or so), the top ring is removed, the ones underneath are moved up, and a new ring is added to the bottom. The removed ring is then stored in the Hockey Hall of Fame. The NHL takes the immortality of its winners ''very'' seriously.


Which, of course, leads to the question, "If there is only one single trophy, what happens when they run out of space on the Cup to engrave names?" Well, since 1991, when the size of the Cup was finally capped, each time they Cup runs out of space (once each 13 years or so), the top ring is removed, the ones underneath are moved up, and a new ring is added to the bottom. The removed ring is then stored in the NHL Hall of Fame. The NHL takes the immortality of its winners ''very'' seriously.

The St. Louis Blues are the current Stanley Cup champions, winning it for the first time in franchise history.

to:

Which, of course, leads to the question, "If there is only one single trophy, what happens when they run out of space on the Cup to engrave names?" Well, since 1991, when the size of the Cup was finally capped, each time they Cup runs out of space (once each 13 years or so), the top ring is removed, the ones underneath are moved up, and a new ring is added to the bottom. The removed ring is then stored in the NHL Hockey Hall of Fame. The NHL takes the immortality of its winners ''very'' seriously.

The St. Louis Blues are the current Stanley Cup champions, winning it in 2019 for the first time in franchise history.

Added DiffLines:

** When the St. Louis Blues won in 2019, multiple players ate meals out of the Cup: Captain Alex Pietrangelo ate his grandmother's spaghetti out of it; David Perron shared breakfast with his family in it and then used it to share a poutine lunch with the public in his hometown; and St. Louis native Pat Maroon ate cereal out of it with his son, Anthony, then took it to a St. Louis bar, where everyone ate [[TrademarkFavoriteFood toasted raviolis]] out of it.


* There are three actual Cups: the original bowl (retired in 1969), the authenticated cup that is actually presented at the games (and updated accordingly), and a replica stand-in that is at the Hockey Hall of Fame in Toronto when the authenticated Cup is out of town and up to no good.
* The names of the winning team are engraved into the cup. Once it is filled, the top band of the Cup is removed and a new one is replaced at the bottom, preventing it from growing any longer. As seen below, it's already enormous.

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* There are three actual Cups: the original bowl (retired in 1969), 1969 since it was getting worn out), the authenticated cup that is actually presented at the games (and and updated accordingly), accordingly, and a replica stand-in that is installed at the Hockey Hall of Fame in Toronto when the authenticated Cup is out of town and up to no good.
good. The original bowl is, of course, on permanent display in the Hall.
* The names of the winning team are engraved into onto the cup.Cup's bands. Once it is filled, the top band of the Cup is removed and a new one is replaced at the bottom, preventing it from growing any longer. As seen below, it's already enormous.



* And there was a time when it was bigger than ''that''. Nowadays, each band can store 13 winning clubs' names. Decades ago, though, each band stored one per, and bands were not removed in a timely manner. The Cup became taller and taller till it resembled a stovepipe, hence the nickname "Stovepipe Cup". A 1948 redesign proved insufficient for fixing these problems, so it was redesigned again in 1957; that design is in use today - five bands, 13 clubs per band and remove the topmost one once they're all full - to keep the Cup from growing out of control ever again. It also adds a certain sentimentality to the periodic removal of the top band, as iconic names can disappear from the Cup altogether, as happened in 2018 after the Capitals won and started a new band.

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* And there was a time when it was bigger than ''that''. Nowadays, each band can store 13 winning clubs' names. Decades ago, though, each band stored one per, and bands were not removed in a timely manner. The Cup became taller and taller till it resembled a stovepipe, hence the nickname "Stovepipe Cup". A 1948 redesign proved insufficient for fixing these problems, so it was redesigned again in 1957; that design is in use today - five bands, 13 clubs per band and remove the topmost one once they're all full - to keep the Cup from growing out of control ever again. It also adds a certain sentimentality to the periodic removal of the top band, as iconic names can disappear from the Cup altogether, as happened in 2018 after the Capitals won and started a new band.band; in the process, names like Bobby Hull, Gordie Howe, and Maurice Richard were permanently removed from the Cup.


* And there was a time when it was bigger than ''that''. Nowadays, each band can store 13 winning clubs' names. Decades ago, though, each band stored one per, and bands were not removed in a timely manner. The Cup became taller and taller till it resembled a stovepipe, hence the nickname "Stovepipe Cup". The restrictions today - five bands, 13 clubs per band and remove the topmost one once they're all full - were instituted to keep the Cup from growing out of control ever again.
* Decades before all ''that'', teams sometimes engraved their names directly onto the Cup itself, though usually omitting players' names and just describing the series in which the team won. These engravings were replicated on the replica Cup that is in use today; if you look closely, you can even see names ''in'' the bowl itself. These belong to the March 1907 Montreal Wanderers, though not all of the players involved are even listed (five are missing).

to:

* And there was a time when it was bigger than ''that''. Nowadays, each band can store 13 winning clubs' names. Decades ago, though, each band stored one per, and bands were not removed in a timely manner. The Cup became taller and taller till it resembled a stovepipe, hence the nickname "Stovepipe Cup". The restrictions A 1948 redesign proved insufficient for fixing these problems, so it was redesigned again in 1957; that design is in use today - five bands, 13 clubs per band and remove the topmost one once they're all full - were instituted to keep the Cup from growing out of control ever again.
again. It also adds a certain sentimentality to the periodic removal of the top band, as iconic names can disappear from the Cup altogether, as happened in 2018 after the Capitals won and started a new band.
* Decades before Dating all ''that'', the way back to when the Cup was first implemented, teams sometimes engraved their names directly onto the Cup itself, though usually omitting players' names and just describing the series in which the team won. These engravings were replicated on the replica presentation Cup that is in use today; if you look closely, you can even see names ''in'' the bowl itself. These belong to the March 1907 Montreal Wanderers, though not all of the players involved are even listed (five are missing).

Added DiffLines:

* And there was a time when it was bigger than ''that''. Nowadays, each band can store 13 winning clubs' names. Decades ago, though, each band stored one per, and bands were not removed in a timely manner. The Cup became taller and taller till it resembled a stovepipe, hence the nickname "Stovepipe Cup". The restrictions today - five bands, 13 clubs per band and remove the topmost one once they're all full - were instituted to keep the Cup from growing out of control ever again.
* Decades before all ''that'', teams sometimes engraved their names directly onto the Cup itself, though usually omitting players' names and just describing the series in which the team won. These engravings were replicated on the replica Cup that is in use today; if you look closely, you can even see names ''in'' the bowl itself. These belong to the March 1907 Montreal Wanderers, though not all of the players involved are even listed (five are missing).


* A GretzkyHasTheBall joke in ''ComicStrip/{{Peanuts}}'' had Rerun, a new recruit to Charlie Brown's baseball team, convinced they were playing in the finals of the Stanley Cup.

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* A GretzkyHasTheBall joke in ''ComicStrip/{{Peanuts}}'' had Rerun, a new recruit to Charlie Brown's baseball team, convinced they were playing in the finals of the Stanley Cup. Snoopy also dreamed of playing for the Stanley Cup, practicing on top of his doghouse with Woodstock at one point.


** The New Jersey Devils are the only team, amongst the relocated teams, to have won the Stanley Cup after moving to new cities TWICE (originally the Kansas City Scouts, then the Colorado Rockies).

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** * The New Jersey Devils are the only team, amongst the relocated teams, team to have won the Stanley Cup after moving to new cities TWICE (originally the Kansas City Scouts, then the Colorado Rockies).Rockies).
* The defunct Montreal Maroons won the Cup twice, in 1926 and 1935, then suspended operations in 1938 only to outright cancel the franchise in 1947. Since then, absolutely no Cup winner has ever relocated or gone under.


* Twelve of the NHL's 31 teams have never won the trophy, and of those twelve, four have never made it to the Finals (Winnipeg/Phoenix/Arizona, Atlanta/Winnipeg, Minnesota, and Columbus. [[labelnote:note]]To be fair, three of these teams are among the most recent expansion teams added to the league.[[/labelnote]])
* Of all the teams in the NHL, the St. Louis Blues have gone the longest without winning their first Cup. Founded in 1967, they're tied with the Maple Leafs for the longest Cup drought.

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* Twelve Eleven of the NHL's 31 teams have never won the trophy, and of those twelve, eleven, four have never made it to the Finals (Winnipeg/Phoenix/Arizona, Atlanta/Winnipeg, Minnesota, and Columbus. [[labelnote:note]]To be fair, three of these teams are among the most recent expansion teams added to the league.[[/labelnote]])
* Of all the teams in the NHL, the St. Louis Blues have gone went the longest without winning their first Cup. Founded in 1967, they're they were tied with the Maple Leafs for the longest Cup drought.drought until they won in 2019, a 52-year (and 51-complete-season) span.
* It wouldn't take long to match that record, though: The Vancouver Canucks and Buffalo Sabres are also Cupless and joined in 1970, only three years after the Blues.[[note]]In Vancouver's defense: The Canucks actually have ''six'' championships across ''two'' leagues dating back to before they joined the NHL. They existed for 25 years before becoming an NHL franchise.[[/note]]


The Washington Capitals are the current Stanley Cup champions, winning it for the first time in franchise history.

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The Washington Capitals St. Louis Blues are the current Stanley Cup champions, winning it for the first time in franchise history.

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