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Hip-hop's "golden age" (or "golden era") is a name given to a period in mainstream hip hop, usually cited as being from roughly [[TheEighties 1986]] to [[TheNineties 1997]], said to be characterized by its diversity, quality, innovation, and influence. There were strong themes of Afrocentricity and political militancy, while the music was experimental and the sampling eclectic. The artists most often associated with the phrase are Music/RunDMC. (though they started around the old school era), Music/PublicEnemy, Music/BeastieBoys (like Run-DMC they started around the old school era), Music/BoogieDownProductions, Music/EricBAndRakim, ''Big Daddy Kane'', Music/DeLaSoul, Music/{{EPMD}}, Music/ATribeCalledQuest, and the Jungle Brothers. Releases by these acts co-existed in this period with, and were as commercially viable as, those of early gangsta rap artists such as Music/{{NWA}}, the sex raps of Music/TwoLiveCrew, and party-oriented music by acts such as Kid 'n Play and Music/DJJazzyJeffAndTheFreshPrince.

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Hip-hop's "golden age" (or "golden era") is a name given to a period in mainstream hip hop, usually cited as being from roughly [[TheEighties 1986]] to [[TheNineties 1997]], said to be characterized by its diversity, quality, innovation, and influence. There were strong themes of Afrocentricity and political militancy, while the music was experimental and the sampling eclectic. The artists most often associated with the phrase are Music/RunDMC. (though they started around the old school era), Music/PublicEnemy, Music/BeastieBoys (like Run-DMC they started around the old school era), Music/BoogieDownProductions, Music/EricBAndRakim, ''Big Daddy Kane'', Music/DeLaSoul, Music/{{EPMD}}, Music/ATribeCalledQuest, and the Jungle Brothers. Releases by these acts co-existed in this period with, and were as commercially viable as, those of early gangsta rap artists such as Music/{{NWA}}, the sex raps of Music/TwoLiveCrew, and party-oriented music by acts such as Kid 'n Play Music/KidNPlay and Music/DJJazzyJeffAndTheFreshPrince.


However, the specific time period that the golden age covers varies among different sources. Carl Stoffers of ''New York Daily News'' describes the golden age as "spanning from approximately 1986 to 1997". In their article "In Search of the Golden Age Hip-Hop Sound", music theorists Ben Duinker and Denis Martin of Empirical Musicology Review use "the 11 years between and including 1986 and 1996 as chronological boundaries" to define the golden age, bookended by the releases Run-DMC's ''Raising Hell'' and the Beastie Boys' ''License to Ill'' in 1986, and the deaths of Tupac Shakur and the Notorious B.I.G. in 199697. Coupled with Tupac and Biggie's deaths, the collapse of Creator/DeathRowRecords, and the rise of [[AlternativeHipHop "backpack rap"]], some have cited the mainstream popularization of Music/PuffDaddy, Music/Mase, and Music/MasterP in 1997 as being the end of the Golden Age and the start of hip-hop's "Jiggy Era" (also known as the "Shiny Suit Era", "Bling Era", or "Silver Age of Hip-Hop").

to:

However, the specific time period that the golden age covers varies among different sources. Carl Stoffers of ''New York Daily News'' describes the golden age as "spanning from approximately 1986 to 1997". In their article "In Search of the Golden Age Hip-Hop Sound", music theorists Ben Duinker and Denis Martin of Empirical Musicology Review use "the 11 years between and including 1986 and 1996 as chronological boundaries" to define the golden age, bookended by the releases Run-DMC's ''Raising Hell'' and the Beastie Boys' ''License to Ill'' in 1986, and the deaths of Tupac Shakur and the Notorious B.I.G. in 199697. Coupled with Tupac and Biggie's deaths, the collapse of Creator/DeathRowRecords, the rise of Creator/BadBoyRecords, and the rise of [[AlternativeHipHop "backpack rap"]], rap" fans]] who were disillusioned with the mainstream, some have cited the mainstream popularization of Music/PuffDaddy, Music/Mase, Ma$e, and Music/MasterP in 1997 as being the end of the Golden Age and the start of hip-hop's "Jiggy Era" (also known as the "Shiny Suit Era", "Bling Era", or "Silver Age of Hip-Hop").


Hip-hop's "golden age" (or "golden era") is a name given to a period in mainstream hip hop, usually cited as being from roughly 1986 to 1997, said to be characterized by its diversity, quality, innovation, and influence. There were strong themes of Afrocentricity and political militancy, while the music was experimental and the sampling eclectic. The artists most often associated with the phrase are Music/RunDMC. (though they started around the old school era), Music/PublicEnemy, Music/BeastieBoys (like Run-DMC they started around the old school era), Music/BoogieDownProductions, Music/EricBAndRakim, ''Big Daddy Kane'', Music/DeLaSoul, Music/{{EPMD}}, Music/ATribeCalledQuest, and the Jungle Brothers. Releases by these acts co-existed in this period with, and were as commercially viable as, those of early gangsta rap artists such as Music/{{NWA}}, the sex raps of Music/TwoLiveCrew, and party-oriented music by acts such as Kid 'n Play and Music/DJJazzyJeffAndTheFreshPrince.

to:

Hip-hop's "golden age" (or "golden era") is a name given to a period in mainstream hip hop, usually cited as being from roughly 1986 [[TheEighties 1986]] to 1997, [[TheNineties 1997]], said to be characterized by its diversity, quality, innovation, and influence. There were strong themes of Afrocentricity and political militancy, while the music was experimental and the sampling eclectic. The artists most often associated with the phrase are Music/RunDMC. (though they started around the old school era), Music/PublicEnemy, Music/BeastieBoys (like Run-DMC they started around the old school era), Music/BoogieDownProductions, Music/EricBAndRakim, ''Big Daddy Kane'', Music/DeLaSoul, Music/{{EPMD}}, Music/ATribeCalledQuest, and the Jungle Brothers. Releases by these acts co-existed in this period with, and were as commercially viable as, those of early gangsta rap artists such as Music/{{NWA}}, the sex raps of Music/TwoLiveCrew, and party-oriented music by acts such as Kid 'n Play and Music/DJJazzyJeffAndTheFreshPrince.



However, the specific time period that the golden age covers varies among different sources. Carl Stoffers of ''New York Daily News'' describes the golden age as "spanning from approximately 1986 to 1997". In their article "In Search of the Golden Age Hip-Hop Sound", music theorists Ben Duinker and Denis Martin of Empirical Musicology Review use "the 11 years between and including 1986 and 1996 as chronological boundaries" to define the golden age, bookended by the releases Run-DMC's ''Raising Hell'' and the Beastie Boys' ''License to Ill'' in 1986, and the deaths of Tupac Shakur and the Notorious B.I.G. in 199697. Some have cited the mainstream popularity of Music/PuffDaddy and Music/Mase in 1997, coupled with Tupac and Biggie's deaths, as being the end of the Golden Age and the start of mainstream rap's "Jiggy Era" (also known as the "Shiny Suit Era", "Bling Era", or "Silver Age of Hip-Hop").

to:

However, the specific time period that the golden age covers varies among different sources. Carl Stoffers of ''New York Daily News'' describes the golden age as "spanning from approximately 1986 to 1997". In their article "In Search of the Golden Age Hip-Hop Sound", music theorists Ben Duinker and Denis Martin of Empirical Musicology Review use "the 11 years between and including 1986 and 1996 as chronological boundaries" to define the golden age, bookended by the releases Run-DMC's ''Raising Hell'' and the Beastie Boys' ''License to Ill'' in 1986, and the deaths of Tupac Shakur and the Notorious B.I.G. in 199697. Some have cited the mainstream popularity of Music/PuffDaddy and Music/Mase in 1997, coupled Coupled with Tupac and Biggie's deaths, the collapse of Creator/DeathRowRecords, and the rise of [[AlternativeHipHop "backpack rap"]], some have cited the mainstream popularization of Music/PuffDaddy, Music/Mase, and Music/MasterP in 1997 as being the end of the Golden Age and the start of mainstream rap's hip-hop's "Jiggy Era" (also known as the "Shiny Suit Era", "Bling Era", or "Silver Age of Hip-Hop").


Hip hop's "golden age" (or "golden era") is a name given to a period in mainstream hip hop, usually cited as being from roughly 1986 to 1997, said to be characterized by its diversity, quality, innovation, and influence. There were strong themes of Afrocentricity and political militancy, while the music was experimental and the sampling eclectic. The artists most often associated with the phrase are Music/RunDMC. (though they started around the old school era), Music/PublicEnemy, Music/BeastieBoys (like Run-DMC they started around the old school era), Music/BoogieDownProductions, Music/EricBAndRakim, ''Big Daddy Kane'', Music/DeLaSoul, Music/{{EPMD}}, Music/ATribeCalledQuest, and the Jungle Brothers. Releases by these acts co-existed in this period with, and were as commercially viable as, those of early gangsta rap artists such as Music/{{NWA}}, the sex raps of Music/TwoLiveCrew, and party-oriented music by acts such as Kid 'n Play and Music/DJJazzyJeffAndTheFreshPrince.

to:

Hip hop's Hip-hop's "golden age" (or "golden era") is a name given to a period in mainstream hip hop, usually cited as being from roughly 1986 to 1997, said to be characterized by its diversity, quality, innovation, and influence. There were strong themes of Afrocentricity and political militancy, while the music was experimental and the sampling eclectic. The artists most often associated with the phrase are Music/RunDMC. (though they started around the old school era), Music/PublicEnemy, Music/BeastieBoys (like Run-DMC they started around the old school era), Music/BoogieDownProductions, Music/EricBAndRakim, ''Big Daddy Kane'', Music/DeLaSoul, Music/{{EPMD}}, Music/ATribeCalledQuest, and the Jungle Brothers. Releases by these acts co-existed in this period with, and were as commercially viable as, those of early gangsta rap artists such as Music/{{NWA}}, the sex raps of Music/TwoLiveCrew, and party-oriented music by acts such as Kid 'n Play and Music/DJJazzyJeffAndTheFreshPrince.



However, the specific time period that the golden age covers varies among different sources. Carl Stoffers of ''New York Daily News'' describes the golden age as "spanning from approximately 1986 to 1997". In their article "In Search of the Golden Age Hip-Hop Sound", music theorists Ben Duinker and Denis Martin of Empirical Musicology Review use "the 11 years between and including 1986 and 1996 as chronological boundaries" to define the golden age, bookended by the releases Run-DMC's ''Raising Hell'' and the Beastie Boys' ''License to Ill'' in 1986, and the deaths of Tupac Shakur and the Notorious B.I.G. in 199697. Some refer to the period of 19921997 as "a second Golden Age" (or the second half of the larger Golden Age) that saw influential, high-quality albums using elements of past classicism E-mu SP-1200 drum sounds, turntable scratches, references to old school hip hop hits, and "tongue-twisting triplet verbalisms" while making clear that new directions were being taken, such as the mainstreaming of gangsta rap and G-funk. People list as examples the Music/DrDre's ''Music/TheChronic'' (1992), the Music/WuTangClan's ''Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers)'' (1993) and ''Wu-Tang Forever'' (1997), Music/Nas's ''Illmatic'' (1994) and ''It Was Written'' (1996), Music/DeLaSoul's ''Buhloone Mindstate'' (1993) and ''Stakes Is High'' (1996), Music/SnoopDogg's ''Doggystyle'' (1993), Music/ATribeCalledQuest's ''Midnight Marauders'' (1993), Music/Mobb Deep's ''The Infamous'' (1994), Music/BoneThugsNHarmony's ''Creepin On Ah Come Up'' (1994) and ''E.1999 Eternal'' (1995), Music/TupacShakur's ''Music/MeAgainstTheWorld'' (1995) and ''Music/AllEyezOnMe'' (1996), Music/TheNotoriousBIG's ''Music/ReadyToDie'' (1994) and ''Music/LifeAfterDeath'' (1997), Music/JayZ's ''Reasonable Doubt'' (1996), and Music/OutKast's ''Southernplayalisticadillacmuzik'' (1994) and ''ATLiens'' (1996).

to:

However, the specific time period that the golden age covers varies among different sources. Carl Stoffers of ''New York Daily News'' describes the golden age as "spanning from approximately 1986 to 1997". In their article "In Search of the Golden Age Hip-Hop Sound", music theorists Ben Duinker and Denis Martin of Empirical Musicology Review use "the 11 years between and including 1986 and 1996 as chronological boundaries" to define the golden age, bookended by the releases Run-DMC's ''Raising Hell'' and the Beastie Boys' ''License to Ill'' in 1986, and the deaths of Tupac Shakur and the Notorious B.I.G. in 199697. Some have cited the mainstream popularity of Music/PuffDaddy and Music/Mase in 1997, coupled with Tupac and Biggie's deaths, as being the end of the Golden Age and the start of mainstream rap's "Jiggy Era" (also known as the "Shiny Suit Era", "Bling Era", or "Silver Age of Hip-Hop").

Some refer to the period of 19921997 as "a second Golden Age" (or the second half of the larger Golden Age) that saw influential, high-quality albums using elements of past classicism E-mu SP-1200 drum sounds, turntable scratches, references to old school hip hop hits, and "tongue-twisting triplet verbalisms" while making clear that new directions were being taken, such as the mainstreaming of gangsta rap and G-funk. People list as examples the Music/DrDre's ''Music/TheChronic'' (1992), the Music/WuTangClan's ''Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers)'' (1993) and ''Wu-Tang Forever'' (1997), Music/Nas's ''Illmatic'' (1994) and ''It Was Written'' (1996), Music/DeLaSoul's ''Buhloone Mindstate'' (1993) and ''Stakes Is High'' (1996), Music/SnoopDogg's ''Doggystyle'' (1993), Music/ATribeCalledQuest's ''Midnight Marauders'' (1993), Music/Mobb Deep's ''The Infamous'' (1994), Music/BoneThugsNHarmony's ''Creepin On Ah Come Up'' (1994) and ''E.1999 Eternal'' (1995), Music/TupacShakur's ''Music/MeAgainstTheWorld'' (1995) and ''Music/AllEyezOnMe'' (1996), Music/TheNotoriousBIG's ''Music/ReadyToDie'' (1994) and ''Music/LifeAfterDeath'' (1997), Music/JayZ's ''Reasonable Doubt'' (1996), and Music/OutKast's ''Southernplayalisticadillacmuzik'' (1994) and ''ATLiens'' (1996).



Hip hop's "golden age" (or "golden era") is a name given to a period in mainstream hip hop, usually cited as being a period from roughly 1986 to 1997 said to be characterized by its diversity, quality, innovation and influence. There were strong themes of Afrocentricity and political militancy, while the music was experimental and the sampling eclectic. The artists most often associated with the phrase are Music/RunDMC. (though they started around the old school era), Music/PublicEnemy, Music/BeastieBoys (like Run-DMC they started around the old school era), Music/BoogieDownProductions, Music/EricBAndRakim, ''Big Daddy Kane'', Music/DeLaSoul, Music/{{EPMD}}, Music/ATribeCalledQuest, and the Jungle Brothers. Releases by these acts co-existed in this period with, and were as commercially viable as, those of early gangsta rap artists such as Music/{{NWA}}, the sex raps of Music/TwoLiveCrew, and party-oriented music by acts such as Kid 'n Play and Music/DJJazzyJeffAndTheFreshPrince.

to:

\nHip hop's "golden age" (or "golden era") is a name given to a period in mainstream hip hop, usually cited as being a period from roughly 1986 to 1997 1997, said to be characterized by its diversity, quality, innovation innovation, and influence. There were strong themes of Afrocentricity and political militancy, while the music was experimental and the sampling eclectic. The artists most often associated with the phrase are Music/RunDMC. (though they started around the old school era), Music/PublicEnemy, Music/BeastieBoys (like Run-DMC they started around the old school era), Music/BoogieDownProductions, Music/EricBAndRakim, ''Big Daddy Kane'', Music/DeLaSoul, Music/{{EPMD}}, Music/ATribeCalledQuest, and the Jungle Brothers. Releases by these acts co-existed in this period with, and were as commercially viable as, those of early gangsta rap artists such as Music/{{NWA}}, the sex raps of Music/TwoLiveCrew, and party-oriented music by acts such as Kid 'n Play and Music/DJJazzyJeffAndTheFreshPrince.



However, the specific time period that the golden age covers varies among different sources. Carl Stoffers of ''New York Daily News'' describes the golden age as "spanning from approximately 1986 to 1997". In their article "In Search of the Golden Age Hip-Hop Sound", music theorists Ben Duinker and Denis Martin of Empirical Musicology Review use "the 11 years between and including 1986 and 1996 as chronological boundaries" to define the golden age, bookended by the releases Run-DMC's ''Raising Hell'' and the Beastie Boys' ''License to Ill'' in 1986, and the deaths of Tupac Shakur and the Notorious B.I.G. in 199697. Some refer to the period of 19921997 as "a second Golden Age" (or the second half of the larger Golden Age) that saw influential, high-quality albums using elements of past classicism E-mu SP-1200 drum sounds, turntable scratches, references to old school hip hop hits, and "tongue-twisting triplet verbalisms" while making clear that new directions were being taken, such as the mainstreaming of gangsta rap and G-funk. People list as examples the Music/DrDre's ''Music/TheChronic'' (1992), the Music/WuTangClan's ''Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers)'' (1993), Music/Nas's ''Illmatic'' (1994), Music/DeLaSoul's ''Buhloone Mindstate'' (1993) and ''Stakes Is High'' (1996), Music/SnoopDogg's ''Doggystyle'' (1993), Music/ATribeCalledQuest's ''Midnight Marauders'' (1993), Music/Mobb Deep's ''The Infamous'' (1994), Music/BoneThugsNHarmony's ''Creepin On Ah Come Up'' (1994) and ''E.1999 Eternal'' (1995), Music/TupacShakur's ''Music/MeAgainstTheWorld'' (1995) and ''Music/AllEyezOnMe'' (1996), Music/TheNotoriousBIG's ''Music/ReadyToDie'' (1994) and ''Music/LifeAfterDeath'' (1997), and Music/OutKast's ''Southernplayalisticadillacmuzik'' (1994) and ''ATLiens'' (1996).

Either way TheNineties as a whole were a turning point for rap music. The decade introduced a large array of sub-genres that showed that rap could be more than just block party music, and that it could also have strong messages and themes (much to the chagrin of fans who were used to it just being "fun"). It also saw the growth in rap's popularity outside of UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity, or UsefulNotes/NewJersey (Like UsefulNotes/NewOrleans, UsefulNotes/{{Atlanta}}, UsefulNotes/LosAngeles, Memphis, UsefulNotes/{{Houston}}, UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}}, UsefulNotes/{{Detroit}}, and Flint Michigan, UsefulNotes/{{Miami}}, UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}}). And the rise of prosperous Hip-Hop record labels, resulting in what is arguably the climax of the Golden Age era. Incidentally, the late [=80s=]/early [=90s=] are also the period where rap started to grow ''outside'' of the United States, each country starting to develop its own specificities in its approach of the genre. France notably had its own golden age in the 90's and early 2000's, an entire French generation growing up with MC Solaar, IAM, NTM, Ärsenik or Oxmo Puccino, to name a few.

to:

However, the specific time period that the golden age covers varies among different sources. Carl Stoffers of ''New York Daily News'' describes the golden age as "spanning from approximately 1986 to 1997". In their article "In Search of the Golden Age Hip-Hop Sound", music theorists Ben Duinker and Denis Martin of Empirical Musicology Review use "the 11 years between and including 1986 and 1996 as chronological boundaries" to define the golden age, bookended by the releases Run-DMC's ''Raising Hell'' and the Beastie Boys' ''License to Ill'' in 1986, and the deaths of Tupac Shakur and the Notorious B.I.G. in 199697. Some refer to the period of 19921997 as "a second Golden Age" (or the second half of the larger Golden Age) that saw influential, high-quality albums using elements of past classicism E-mu SP-1200 drum sounds, turntable scratches, references to old school hip hop hits, and "tongue-twisting triplet verbalisms" while making clear that new directions were being taken, such as the mainstreaming of gangsta rap and G-funk. People list as examples the Music/DrDre's ''Music/TheChronic'' (1992), the Music/WuTangClan's ''Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers)'' (1993), (1993) and ''Wu-Tang Forever'' (1997), Music/Nas's ''Illmatic'' (1994), (1994) and ''It Was Written'' (1996), Music/DeLaSoul's ''Buhloone Mindstate'' (1993) and ''Stakes Is High'' (1996), Music/SnoopDogg's ''Doggystyle'' (1993), Music/ATribeCalledQuest's ''Midnight Marauders'' (1993), Music/Mobb Deep's ''The Infamous'' (1994), Music/BoneThugsNHarmony's ''Creepin On Ah Come Up'' (1994) and ''E.1999 Eternal'' (1995), Music/TupacShakur's ''Music/MeAgainstTheWorld'' (1995) and ''Music/AllEyezOnMe'' (1996), Music/TheNotoriousBIG's ''Music/ReadyToDie'' (1994) and ''Music/LifeAfterDeath'' (1997), Music/JayZ's ''Reasonable Doubt'' (1996), and Music/OutKast's ''Southernplayalisticadillacmuzik'' (1994) and ''ATLiens'' (1996).

Either way TheNineties as a whole were a turning point for rap music. The decade introduced a large array of sub-genres that showed that rap could be more than just block party music, and that it could also have strong messages and themes (much to the chagrin of fans who were used to it just being "fun"). It also saw the growth in rap's popularity outside of UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity, or UsefulNotes/NewJersey (Like UsefulNotes/NewOrleans, UsefulNotes/{{Atlanta}}, UsefulNotes/LosAngeles, Memphis, UsefulNotes/{{Houston}}, UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}}, UsefulNotes/{{Detroit}}, and Flint Michigan, UsefulNotes/{{Miami}}, UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}}). And the rise of prosperous Hip-Hop record labels, resulting in what is arguably the climax of the Golden Age era. Incidentally, the late [=80s=]/early [=90s=] are also the period where rap started to grow ''outside'' of the United States, each country starting to develop its own specificities in its approach of the genre. France notably had its own golden age in the 90's '90s and early 2000's, 2000s, an entire French generation growing up with MC Solaar, IAM, NTM, Ärsenik or Oxmo Puccino, to name a few.


Hip hop's "golden age" (or "golden era") is a name given to a period in mainstream hip hop, usually cited as being a period varying in time frames during the 1980s and 1990s said to be characterized by its diversity, quality, innovation and influence. There were strong themes of Afrocentricity and political militancy, while the music was experimental and the sampling eclectic. The artists most often associated with the phrase are Music/RunDMC. (though they started around the ol skool era), Music/PublicEnemy, Music/BeastieBoys (like Run-DMC they started around the ol skool era), Music/BoogieDownProductions, Music/EricBAndRakim, ''Big Daddy Kane'', Music/DeLaSoul, Music/{{EPMD}}, Music/ATribeCalledQuest, and the Jungle Brothers. Releases by these acts co-existed in this period with, and were as commercially viable as, those of early gangsta rap artists such as Music/{{NWA}}, the sex raps of Music/TwoLiveCrew, and party-oriented music by acts such as Kid 'n Play and Music/DJJazzyJeffAndTheFreshPrince.

to:

Hip hop's "golden age" (or "golden era") is a name given to a period in mainstream hip hop, usually cited as being a period varying in time frames during the 1980s and 1990s from roughly 1986 to 1997 said to be characterized by its diversity, quality, innovation and influence. There were strong themes of Afrocentricity and political militancy, while the music was experimental and the sampling eclectic. The artists most often associated with the phrase are Music/RunDMC. (though they started around the ol skool old school era), Music/PublicEnemy, Music/BeastieBoys (like Run-DMC they started around the ol skool old school era), Music/BoogieDownProductions, Music/EricBAndRakim, ''Big Daddy Kane'', Music/DeLaSoul, Music/{{EPMD}}, Music/ATribeCalledQuest, and the Jungle Brothers. Releases by these acts co-existed in this period with, and were as commercially viable as, those of early gangsta rap artists such as Music/{{NWA}}, the sex raps of Music/TwoLiveCrew, and party-oriented music by acts such as Kid 'n Play and Music/DJJazzyJeffAndTheFreshPrince.



However, the specific time period that the golden age covers varies among different sources. The New York Times defines hip-hop's golden age as the "late 1980's and early 90's. In the book Contemporary Youth Culture, the "golden age era" is described as being "from 19871999", coming after "the old school era: from 1979 to 1985". Some refer to the period of 19931995, or 1993 to 1999 as "a second Golden Age" (or a Silver Age) that saw influential, high quality albums using elements of past classicism E-mu SP-1200 drum sounds, turntable scratches, references to old school hip hop hits, and "tongue-twisting triplet verbalisms" while making clear that new directions were being taken. People list as examples the Music/WuTangClan's ''Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers)'', Music/{{Nas}}' ''Illmatic'', Music/DeLaSoul's 1993 release ''Buhloone Mindstate'', Music/SnoopDogg's ''Doggystyle'', Music/ATribeCalledQuest's third album ''Midnight Marauders'', Music/Mobb Deep's ''The Infamous'' (95), Music/BoneThugsNHarmony's first two albums (''Creepin On Ah Come Up'' 94, and ''E.1999 Eternal'' 95), Music/TheNotoriousBIG's ''Music/ReadyToDie ''(94), and Music/OutKast's debut ''Southernplayalisticadillacmuzik'' (94), and their later 90's albums. So at the very least it's late [[TheEighties '80s]], to about early to mid/late [[TheNineties '90s]].

to:

However, the specific time period that the golden age covers varies among different sources. The New Carl Stoffers of ''New York Times defines hip-hop's Daily News'' describes the golden age as "spanning from approximately 1986 to 1997". In their article "In Search of the "late 1980's Golden Age Hip-Hop Sound", music theorists Ben Duinker and early 90's. In the book Contemporary Youth Culture, the "golden age era" is described as being "from 19871999", coming after Denis Martin of Empirical Musicology Review use "the old school era: from 1979 11 years between and including 1986 and 1996 as chronological boundaries" to 1985". define the golden age, bookended by the releases Run-DMC's ''Raising Hell'' and the Beastie Boys' ''License to Ill'' in 1986, and the deaths of Tupac Shakur and the Notorious B.I.G. in 199697. Some refer to the period of 19931995, or 1993 to 1999 19921997 as "a second Golden Age" (or a Silver the second half of the larger Golden Age) that saw influential, high quality high-quality albums using elements of past classicism E-mu SP-1200 drum sounds, turntable scratches, references to old school hip hop hits, and "tongue-twisting triplet verbalisms" while making clear that new directions were being taken. taken, such as the mainstreaming of gangsta rap and G-funk. People list as examples the Music/DrDre's ''Music/TheChronic'' (1992), the Music/WuTangClan's ''Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers)'', Music/{{Nas}}' ''Illmatic'', Chambers)'' (1993), Music/Nas's ''Illmatic'' (1994), Music/DeLaSoul's 1993 release ''Buhloone Mindstate'', Mindstate'' (1993) and ''Stakes Is High'' (1996), Music/SnoopDogg's ''Doggystyle'', ''Doggystyle'' (1993), Music/ATribeCalledQuest's third album ''Midnight Marauders'', Marauders'' (1993), Music/Mobb Deep's ''The Infamous'' (95), (1994), Music/BoneThugsNHarmony's first two albums (''Creepin ''Creepin On Ah Come Up'' 94, (1994) and ''E.1999 Eternal'' 95), (1995), Music/TupacShakur's ''Music/MeAgainstTheWorld'' (1995) and ''Music/AllEyezOnMe'' (1996), Music/TheNotoriousBIG's ''Music/ReadyToDie ''(94), ''Music/ReadyToDie'' (1994) and ''Music/LifeAfterDeath'' (1997), and Music/OutKast's debut ''Southernplayalisticadillacmuzik'' (94), (1994) and their later 90's albums. So at the very least it's late [[TheEighties '80s]], to about early to mid/late [[TheNineties '90s]].
''ATLiens'' (1996).


However, the specific time period that the golden age covers varies among different sources. The New York Times defines hip-hop's golden age as the "late 1980's and early 90's. In the book Contemporary Youth Culture, the "golden age era" is described as being "from 19871999", coming after "the old school era: from 1979 to 1985". Some refer to the period of 19931995, or 1993 to 1999 as "a second Golden Age" (or a Silver Age) that saw influential, high quality albums using elements of past classicism E-mu SP-1200 drum sounds, turntable scratches, references to old school hip hop hits, and "tongue-twisting triplet verbalisms" while making clear that new directions were being taken. People list as examples the Music/WuTangClan's ''Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers)'', Music/{{Nas}}' ''Illmatic'', Music/DeLaSoul's 1993 release ''Buhloone Mindstate'', Music/SnoopDogg's ''Doggystyle'', Music/ATribeCalledQuest's third album ''Midnight Marauders'', Music/JayZ's ''Reasonable Doubt'' (96), Music/BoneThugsNHarmony's first two albums (''Creepin On Ah Come Up'' 94, and ''E.1999 Eternal'' 95), Music/TheNotoriousBIG's ''Music/ReadyToDie ''(94), and Music/OutKast's debut ''Southernplayalisticadillacmuzik'' (94), and their later 90's albums. So at the very least it's late [[TheEighties '80s]], to about early to mid/late [[TheNineties '90s]].

to:

However, the specific time period that the golden age covers varies among different sources. The New York Times defines hip-hop's golden age as the "late 1980's and early 90's. In the book Contemporary Youth Culture, the "golden age era" is described as being "from 19871999", coming after "the old school era: from 1979 to 1985". Some refer to the period of 19931995, or 1993 to 1999 as "a second Golden Age" (or a Silver Age) that saw influential, high quality albums using elements of past classicism E-mu SP-1200 drum sounds, turntable scratches, references to old school hip hop hits, and "tongue-twisting triplet verbalisms" while making clear that new directions were being taken. People list as examples the Music/WuTangClan's ''Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers)'', Music/{{Nas}}' ''Illmatic'', Music/DeLaSoul's 1993 release ''Buhloone Mindstate'', Music/SnoopDogg's ''Doggystyle'', Music/ATribeCalledQuest's third album ''Midnight Marauders'', Music/JayZ's ''Reasonable Doubt'' (96), Music/Mobb Deep's ''The Infamous'' (95), Music/BoneThugsNHarmony's first two albums (''Creepin On Ah Come Up'' 94, and ''E.1999 Eternal'' 95), Music/TheNotoriousBIG's ''Music/ReadyToDie ''(94), and Music/OutKast's debut ''Southernplayalisticadillacmuzik'' (94), and their later 90's albums. So at the very least it's late [[TheEighties '80s]], to about early to mid/late [[TheNineties '90s]].


Either way TheNineties as a whole were a turning point for rap music. The decade introduced a large array of sub-genres that showed that rap could be more than just block party music, and that it could also have strong messages and themes (much to the chagrin of fans who were used to it just being "fun"). It also saw the growth in rap's popularity outside of UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity, or UsefulNotes/NewJersey (Like UsefulNotes/NewOrleans, UsefulNotes/{{Atlanta}}, UsefulNotes/LosAngeles, Memphis, Houston, UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}}, UsefulNotes/{{Detroit}}, and Flint Michigan, UsefulNotes/{{Miami}}, UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}}). And the rise of prosperous Hip-Hop record labels, resulting in what is arguably the climax of the Golden Age era. Incidentally, the late [=80s=]/early [=90s=] are also the period where rap started to grow ''outside'' of the United States, each country starting to develop its own specificities in its approach of the genre. France notably had its own golden age in the 90's and early 2000's, an entire French generation growing up with MC Solaar, IAM, NTM, Ärsenik or Oxmo Puccino, to name a few.

to:

Either way TheNineties as a whole were a turning point for rap music. The decade introduced a large array of sub-genres that showed that rap could be more than just block party music, and that it could also have strong messages and themes (much to the chagrin of fans who were used to it just being "fun"). It also saw the growth in rap's popularity outside of UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity, or UsefulNotes/NewJersey (Like UsefulNotes/NewOrleans, UsefulNotes/{{Atlanta}}, UsefulNotes/LosAngeles, Memphis, Houston, UsefulNotes/{{Houston}}, UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}}, UsefulNotes/{{Detroit}}, and Flint Michigan, UsefulNotes/{{Miami}}, UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}}). And the rise of prosperous Hip-Hop record labels, resulting in what is arguably the climax of the Golden Age era. Incidentally, the late [=80s=]/early [=90s=] are also the period where rap started to grow ''outside'' of the United States, each country starting to develop its own specificities in its approach of the genre. France notably had its own golden age in the 90's and early 2000's, an entire French generation growing up with MC Solaar, IAM, NTM, Ärsenik or Oxmo Puccino, to name a few.


Hip hop's "golden age" (or "golden era") is a name given to a period in mainstream hip hop, usually cited as being a period varying in time frames during the 1980s and 1990s said to be characterized by its diversity, quality, innovation and influence. There were strong themes of Afrocentricity and political militancy, while the music was experimental and the sampling eclectic. The artists most often associated with the phrase are Music/RunDMC. (though they started around the ol skool era), Music/PublicEnemy, Music/BeastieBoys (like Run-DMC they started around the ol skool era), Music/BoogieDownProductions, Music/EricBAndRakim, ''Big Daddy Kane'', Music/DeLaSoul, Music/{{EPMD}}, Music/ATribeCalledQuest, and the Jungle Brothers. Releases by these acts co-existed in this period with, and were as commercially viable as, those of early gangsta rap artists such as Music/{{NWA}}, the sex raps of Music/TwoLiveCrew, and party-oriented music by acts such as Kid 'n Play and DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince.

to:

Hip hop's "golden age" (or "golden era") is a name given to a period in mainstream hip hop, usually cited as being a period varying in time frames during the 1980s and 1990s said to be characterized by its diversity, quality, innovation and influence. There were strong themes of Afrocentricity and political militancy, while the music was experimental and the sampling eclectic. The artists most often associated with the phrase are Music/RunDMC. (though they started around the ol skool era), Music/PublicEnemy, Music/BeastieBoys (like Run-DMC they started around the ol skool era), Music/BoogieDownProductions, Music/EricBAndRakim, ''Big Daddy Kane'', Music/DeLaSoul, Music/{{EPMD}}, Music/ATribeCalledQuest, and the Jungle Brothers. Releases by these acts co-existed in this period with, and were as commercially viable as, those of early gangsta rap artists such as Music/{{NWA}}, the sex raps of Music/TwoLiveCrew, and party-oriented music by acts such as Kid 'n Play and DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince.
Music/DJJazzyJeffAndTheFreshPrince.


Hip hop's "golden age" (or "golden era") is a name given to a period in mainstream hip hop, usually cited as being a period varying in time frames during the 1980s and 1990s said to be characterized by its diversity, quality, innovation and influence. There were strong themes of Afrocentricity and political militancy, while the music was experimental and the sampling eclectic. The artists most often associated with the phrase are Music/RunDMC. (though they started around the ol skool era), Music/PublicEnemy, Music/BeastieBoys (like Run-DMC they started around the ol skool era), Music/BoogieDownProductions, Music/EricBAndRakim, Music/BigDaddyKane, Music/DeLaSoul, Music/{{EPMD}}, Music/ATribeCalledQuest, and the Jungle Brothers. Releases by these acts co-existed in this period with, and were as commercially viable as, those of early gangsta rap artists such as Music/{{NWA}}, the sex raps of Music/TwoLiveCrew, and party-oriented music by acts such as Kid 'n Play and DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince.

to:

Hip hop's "golden age" (or "golden era") is a name given to a period in mainstream hip hop, usually cited as being a period varying in time frames during the 1980s and 1990s said to be characterized by its diversity, quality, innovation and influence. There were strong themes of Afrocentricity and political militancy, while the music was experimental and the sampling eclectic. The artists most often associated with the phrase are Music/RunDMC. (though they started around the ol skool era), Music/PublicEnemy, Music/BeastieBoys (like Run-DMC they started around the ol skool era), Music/BoogieDownProductions, Music/EricBAndRakim, Music/BigDaddyKane, ''Big Daddy Kane'', Music/DeLaSoul, Music/{{EPMD}}, Music/ATribeCalledQuest, and the Jungle Brothers. Releases by these acts co-existed in this period with, and were as commercially viable as, those of early gangsta rap artists such as Music/{{NWA}}, the sex raps of Music/TwoLiveCrew, and party-oriented music by acts such as Kid 'n Play and DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince.


However, the specific time period that the golden age covers varies among different sources. The New York Times defines hip-hop's golden age as the "late 1980's and early 90's. In the book Contemporary Youth Culture, the "golden age era" is described as being "from 19871999", coming after "the old school era: from 1979 to 1985". Some refer to the period of 19931995, or 1993 to 1999 as "a second Golden Age" (or a Silver Age) that saw influential, high quality albums using elements of past classicism E-mu SP-1200 drum sounds, turntable scratches, references to old school hip hop hits, and "tongue-twisting triplet verbalisms" while making clear that new directions were being taken. People list as examples the Music/WuTangClan's ''Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers)'', Music/{{Nas}}' ''Illmatic'', Music/DeLaSoul's 1993 release ''Buhloone Mindstate'', Music/SnoopDogg's ''Doggystyle'', Music/ATribeCalledQuest's third album ''Midnight Marauders'', Music/JayZ's ''Reasonable Doubt'' (96), Music/BoneThugsNHarmony's first two albums (''Creepin On Ah Come Up 94'', and ''E.1999 Eternal'' 95), Music/TheNotoriousBIG's ''Music/ReadyToDie ''(94), and Music/OutKast's debut ''Southernplayalisticadillacmuzik'' (94), and their later 90's albums. So at the very least it's late [[TheEighties '80s]], to about early to mid/late [[TheNineties '90s]].

to:

However, the specific time period that the golden age covers varies among different sources. The New York Times defines hip-hop's golden age as the "late 1980's and early 90's. In the book Contemporary Youth Culture, the "golden age era" is described as being "from 19871999", coming after "the old school era: from 1979 to 1985". Some refer to the period of 19931995, or 1993 to 1999 as "a second Golden Age" (or a Silver Age) that saw influential, high quality albums using elements of past classicism E-mu SP-1200 drum sounds, turntable scratches, references to old school hip hop hits, and "tongue-twisting triplet verbalisms" while making clear that new directions were being taken. People list as examples the Music/WuTangClan's ''Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers)'', Music/{{Nas}}' ''Illmatic'', Music/DeLaSoul's 1993 release ''Buhloone Mindstate'', Music/SnoopDogg's ''Doggystyle'', Music/ATribeCalledQuest's third album ''Midnight Marauders'', Music/JayZ's ''Reasonable Doubt'' (96), Music/BoneThugsNHarmony's first two albums (''Creepin On Ah Come Up 94'', Up'' 94, and ''E.1999 Eternal'' 95), Music/TheNotoriousBIG's ''Music/ReadyToDie ''(94), and Music/OutKast's debut ''Southernplayalisticadillacmuzik'' (94), and their later 90's albums. So at the very least it's late [[TheEighties '80s]], to about early to mid/late [[TheNineties '90s]].


However, the specific time period that the golden age covers varies among different sources. The New York Times defines hip-hop's golden age as the "late 1980's and early 90's. In the book Contemporary Youth Culture, the "golden age era" is described as being "from 19871999", coming after "the old school era: from 1979 to 1985". Some refer to the period of 19931995, or 1993 to 1999 as "a second Golden Age" (or a Silver Age) that saw influential, high quality albums using elements of past classicism E-mu SP-1200 drum sounds, turntable scratches, references to old school hip hop hits, and "tongue-twisting triplet verbalisms" while making clear that new directions were being taken. People list as examples the Music/WuTangClan's ''Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers)'', Music/{{Nas}}' ''Illmatic'', Music/DeLaSoul's 1993 release ''Buhloone Mindstate'', Music/SnoopDogg's "Doggystyle", Music/ATribeCalledQuest's third album "Midnight Marauders", Music/JayZ's ''Reasonable Doubt'' (96), Music/BoneThugsNHarmony's first two albums (''Creepin On Ah Come Up 94'', and ''E.1999 Eternal'' 95), Music/TheNotoriousBIG's ''Music/ReadyToDie ''(94), and Music/OutKast's debut ''Southernplayalisticadillacmuzik'' (94), and their later 90's albums. So at the very least it's late [[TheEighties '80s]], to about early to mid/late [[TheNineties '90s]].

to:

However, the specific time period that the golden age covers varies among different sources. The New York Times defines hip-hop's golden age as the "late 1980's and early 90's. In the book Contemporary Youth Culture, the "golden age era" is described as being "from 19871999", coming after "the old school era: from 1979 to 1985". Some refer to the period of 19931995, or 1993 to 1999 as "a second Golden Age" (or a Silver Age) that saw influential, high quality albums using elements of past classicism E-mu SP-1200 drum sounds, turntable scratches, references to old school hip hop hits, and "tongue-twisting triplet verbalisms" while making clear that new directions were being taken. People list as examples the Music/WuTangClan's ''Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers)'', Music/{{Nas}}' ''Illmatic'', Music/DeLaSoul's 1993 release ''Buhloone Mindstate'', Music/SnoopDogg's "Doggystyle", ''Doggystyle'', Music/ATribeCalledQuest's third album "Midnight Marauders", ''Midnight Marauders'', Music/JayZ's ''Reasonable Doubt'' (96), Music/BoneThugsNHarmony's first two albums (''Creepin On Ah Come Up 94'', and ''E.1999 Eternal'' 95), Music/TheNotoriousBIG's ''Music/ReadyToDie ''(94), and Music/OutKast's debut ''Southernplayalisticadillacmuzik'' (94), and their later 90's albums. So at the very least it's late [[TheEighties '80s]], to about early to mid/late [[TheNineties '90s]].


However, the specific time period that the golden age covers varies among different sources. The New York Times defines hip-hop's golden age as the "late 1980's and early 90's. In the book Contemporary Youth Culture, the "golden age era" is described as being "from 19871999", coming after "the old school era: from 1979 to 1985". Some refer to the period of 19931995, or 1993 to 1999 as "a second Golden Age" (or a Silver Age) that saw influential, high quality albums using elements of past classicism E-mu SP-1200 drum sounds, turntable scratches, references to old school hip hop hits, and "tongue-twisting triplet verbalisms" while making clear that new directions were being taken. People list as examples the Music/WuTangClan's "Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers)", Music/{{Nas}}' "Illmatic", Music/DeLaSoul's 1993 release "Buhloone Mindstate", Music/SnoopDogg's "Doggystyle", Music/ATribeCalledQuest's third album "Midnight Marauders", Music/JayZ's "Reasonable Doubt" (96), Music/BoneThugsNHarmony's first two albums ("Creepin On Ah Come Up 94", and "E.1999 Eternal 95"), Music/NotoriousBIG's ''Music/ReadyToDie ''(94), and the Music/{{Outkast}}'s debut "Southernplayalisticadillacmuzik" (94), and their later 90's albums. So at the very least it's late [[TheEighties 80's]], to about early to mid/late [[TheNineties 90's]].

Either way TheNineties as a whole were a turning point for rap music. The decade introduced a large array of sub-genres that showed that rap could be more than just block party music, and that it could also have strong messages and themes (much to the chagrin of fans who were use to it just being "fun"). It also saw the growth in rap's popularity outside of UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity, or UsefulNotes/NewJersey (Like UsefulNotes/NewOrleans, UsefulNotes/{{Atlanta}}, UsefulNotes/LosAngeles, Memphis, Houston, UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}}, UsefulNotes/{{Detroit}}, and Flint Michigan, UsefulNotes/{{Miami}}, UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}}). And the rise of prosperous Hip-Hop record labels, resulting in what is arguably the climax of the Golden Age era. Incidentally, the late [=80s=]/early [=90s=] are also the period where rap started to grow ''outside'' of the United States, each country starting to develop its own specificities in its approach of the genre. France notably had its own golden age in the 90's and early 2000's, an entire French generation growing up with MC Solaar, IAM, NTM, Ärsenik or Oxmo Puccino, to name a few.

to:

However, the specific time period that the golden age covers varies among different sources. The New York Times defines hip-hop's golden age as the "late 1980's and early 90's. In the book Contemporary Youth Culture, the "golden age era" is described as being "from 19871999", coming after "the old school era: from 1979 to 1985". Some refer to the period of 19931995, or 1993 to 1999 as "a second Golden Age" (or a Silver Age) that saw influential, high quality albums using elements of past classicism E-mu SP-1200 drum sounds, turntable scratches, references to old school hip hop hits, and "tongue-twisting triplet verbalisms" while making clear that new directions were being taken. People list as examples the Music/WuTangClan's "Enter ''Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers)", Chambers)'', Music/{{Nas}}' "Illmatic", ''Illmatic'', Music/DeLaSoul's 1993 release "Buhloone Mindstate", ''Buhloone Mindstate'', Music/SnoopDogg's "Doggystyle", Music/ATribeCalledQuest's third album "Midnight Marauders", Music/JayZ's "Reasonable Doubt" ''Reasonable Doubt'' (96), Music/BoneThugsNHarmony's first two albums ("Creepin (''Creepin On Ah Come Up 94", 94'', and "E.''E.1999 Eternal 95"), Music/NotoriousBIG's Eternal'' 95), Music/TheNotoriousBIG's ''Music/ReadyToDie ''(94), and the Music/{{Outkast}}'s Music/OutKast's debut "Southernplayalisticadillacmuzik" ''Southernplayalisticadillacmuzik'' (94), and their later 90's albums. So at the very least it's late [[TheEighties 80's]], '80s]], to about early to mid/late [[TheNineties 90's]].'90s]].

Either way TheNineties as a whole were a turning point for rap music. The decade introduced a large array of sub-genres that showed that rap could be more than just block party music, and that it could also have strong messages and themes (much to the chagrin of fans who were use used to it just being "fun"). It also saw the growth in rap's popularity outside of UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity, or UsefulNotes/NewJersey (Like UsefulNotes/NewOrleans, UsefulNotes/{{Atlanta}}, UsefulNotes/LosAngeles, Memphis, Houston, UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}}, UsefulNotes/{{Detroit}}, and Flint Michigan, UsefulNotes/{{Miami}}, UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}}). And the rise of prosperous Hip-Hop record labels, resulting in what is arguably the climax of the Golden Age era. Incidentally, the late [=80s=]/early [=90s=] are also the period where rap started to grow ''outside'' of the United States, each country starting to develop its own specificities in its approach of the genre. France notably had its own golden age in the 90's and early 2000's, an entire French generation growing up with MC Solaar, IAM, NTM, Ärsenik or Oxmo Puccino, to name a few.


Either way TheNineties as a whole were a turning point for rap music. The decade introduced a large array of sub-genres that showed that rap could be more than just block party music, and that it could also have strong messages and themes (much to the chagrin of fans who were use to it just being "fun"). It also saw the growth in rap's popularity outside of UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity, or UsefulNotes/NewJersey (Like UsefulNotes/NewOrleans, UsefulNotes/{{Atlanta}}, UsefulNotes/LosAngeles, Memphis, Houston, UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}}, UsefulNotes/{{Detroit}}, and Flint Michigan, UsefulNotes/{{Miami}}, UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}}). And the rise of prosperous Hip-Hop record labels, resulting in what is arguably the climax of the Golden Age era. Incidentally, the late [=80s=]/early [=90s=] are also the period where rap started to grow ''outside'' of the United States, each country starting to develop its own specificities in its approach of the genre. France notably had its own golden age in the 90's and early 2000's, an entire generation growing up with MC Solaar, IAM, NTM, Ärsenik or Oxmo Puccino, to name a few.

to:

Either way TheNineties as a whole were a turning point for rap music. The decade introduced a large array of sub-genres that showed that rap could be more than just block party music, and that it could also have strong messages and themes (much to the chagrin of fans who were use to it just being "fun"). It also saw the growth in rap's popularity outside of UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity, or UsefulNotes/NewJersey (Like UsefulNotes/NewOrleans, UsefulNotes/{{Atlanta}}, UsefulNotes/LosAngeles, Memphis, Houston, UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}}, UsefulNotes/{{Detroit}}, and Flint Michigan, UsefulNotes/{{Miami}}, UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}}). And the rise of prosperous Hip-Hop record labels, resulting in what is arguably the climax of the Golden Age era. Incidentally, the late [=80s=]/early [=90s=] are also the period where rap started to grow ''outside'' of the United States, each country starting to develop its own specificities in its approach of the genre. France notably had its own golden age in the 90's and early 2000's, an entire French generation growing up with MC Solaar, IAM, NTM, Ärsenik or Oxmo Puccino, to name a few.


Either way TheNineties as a whole were a turning point for rap music. The decade introduced a large array of sub-genres that showed that rap could be more than just block party music, and that it could also have strong messages and themes (much to the chagrin of fans who were use to it just being "fun"). It also saw the growth in rap's popularity outside of UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity, or UsefulNotes/NewJersey (Like UsefulNotes/NewOrleans, UsefulNotes/{{Atlanta}}, UsefulNotes/LosAngeles, Memphis, Houston, UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}}, UsefulNotes/{{Detroit}}, and Flint Michigan, UsefulNotes/{{Miami}}, UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}}). And the rise of prosperous Hip-Hop record labels, resulting in what is arguably the climax of the Golden Age era. Incidentally, the late [=80s=]/early [=90s=] are also the period where rap started to grow ''outside'' of the United States, each country starting to develop its own specificities in its approach of the genre.

to:

Either way TheNineties as a whole were a turning point for rap music. The decade introduced a large array of sub-genres that showed that rap could be more than just block party music, and that it could also have strong messages and themes (much to the chagrin of fans who were use to it just being "fun"). It also saw the growth in rap's popularity outside of UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity, or UsefulNotes/NewJersey (Like UsefulNotes/NewOrleans, UsefulNotes/{{Atlanta}}, UsefulNotes/LosAngeles, Memphis, Houston, UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}}, UsefulNotes/{{Detroit}}, and Flint Michigan, UsefulNotes/{{Miami}}, UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}}). And the rise of prosperous Hip-Hop record labels, resulting in what is arguably the climax of the Golden Age era. Incidentally, the late [=80s=]/early [=90s=] are also the period where rap started to grow ''outside'' of the United States, each country starting to develop its own specificities in its approach of the genre.
genre. France notably had its own golden age in the 90's and early 2000's, an entire generation growing up with MC Solaar, IAM, NTM, Ärsenik or Oxmo Puccino, to name a few.

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