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In 2013, Steam introduced RPGElements and a CollectibleCardGame, of all things. Shortly before its 2013 Summer Sale, trading cards were introduced to several games (with the Summer Sale, not coincidentally, introducing them to many more), which are collected by playing (or [[LoopholeAbuse sitting at the main menu of]]) the game in question. A full set of these cards (which require either trading with friends or [[BribingYourWayToVictory a trip to the Steam Market to pick them up from other Steam users]] to obtain) earns you a badge based on that game and Steam XP, which increases your Steam level. Increasing your Steam Level is largely a CosmeticReward, but also unlocks friends list slots and profile customization options. In addition, themed profile backgrounds and emoticons can be earned by crafting game badges.

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In 2013, Steam introduced RPGElements and a CollectibleCardGame, of all things. Shortly before its 2013 Summer Sale, trading cards were introduced to several games (with the Summer Sale, not coincidentally, introducing them to many more), which are collected by playing (or [[LoopholeAbuse sitting at the main menu of]]) the game in question. A full set of these cards (which require either trading with friends or [[BribingYourWayToVictory a trip to the Steam Market to pick them up from other Steam users]] to obtain) earns you a badge based on that game and Steam XP, which increases your Steam level. Increasing your Steam Level is largely a CosmeticReward, CosmeticAward, but also unlocks friends list slots and profile customization options. In addition, themed profile backgrounds and emoticons can be earned by crafting game badges.


In 2013, Steam introduced RPGElements and a CollectibleCardGame, of all things. Shortly before its 2013 Summer Sale, trading cards were introduced to several games (with the Summer Sale, not coincidentally, introducing them to many more), which are collected by playing (or [[LoopholeAbuse sitting at the main menu of]]) the game in question. A full set of these cards (which require either trading with friends or [[BribingYourWayToVictory a trip to the Steam Market to pick them up from other Steam users]] to obtain) earns you a badge based on that game and Steam XP, which increases your Steam level. Increasing your Steam Level is largely a BraggingRightsReward, but also unlocks friends list slots and profile customization options. In addition, themed profile backgrounds and emoticons can be earned by crafting game badges.

to:

In 2013, Steam introduced RPGElements and a CollectibleCardGame, of all things. Shortly before its 2013 Summer Sale, trading cards were introduced to several games (with the Summer Sale, not coincidentally, introducing them to many more), which are collected by playing (or [[LoopholeAbuse sitting at the main menu of]]) the game in question. A full set of these cards (which require either trading with friends or [[BribingYourWayToVictory a trip to the Steam Market to pick them up from other Steam users]] to obtain) earns you a badge based on that game and Steam XP, which increases your Steam level. Increasing your Steam Level is largely a BraggingRightsReward, CosmeticReward, but also unlocks friends list slots and profile customization options. In addition, themed profile backgrounds and emoticons can be earned by crafting game badges.


Having the full support of pretty much every major publisher that makes PC titles except Creator/{{Blizzard|Entertainment}} and Creator/ElectronicArts (post-''VideoGame/DragonAgeII'', when they launched their competing service "Origin"), the service makes it easier to download and play PC games, having over ten thousand titles available for download, many of which are classic games in their own right. It also boasts more than 30 million unique users.

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Having the full support of pretty much every major publisher that makes PC titles except Creator/{{Blizzard|Entertainment}} and (from 2012 to 2019) Creator/ElectronicArts (post-''VideoGame/DragonAgeII'', when they launched their competing service "Origin"), Origin, until ''VideoGame/StarWarsJediFallenOrder''), the service makes it easier to download and play PC games, having over ten thousand titles available for download, many of which are classic games in their own right. It also boasts more than 30 million unique users.


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[[quoteright:350:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/steam_logo.org/pmwiki/pub/images/steam_icon_logo.png]]



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[[caption-width-right:350:(insert train-related joke here)]]


On August 21st, 2018, Valve released an upgrade to its "Steam Play" feature for the [[UsefulNotes/{{UNIX}} Linux]] portion of its audience, in that it can theoretically let you play ''any Windows game ever released to the platform!'' Steam Play bundles in a fork of the [[UsefulNotes/{{WINE}} Wine]] project, a [=Direct3D=] 10/ 11 compatibility layer called [=DXVK=], as well as a few custom fixes from both projects to make this project work in harmony. Valve has called this project "Proton", and released it alongside 21 officially supported games, such as ''VideoGame/Doom2016'' and ''VideoGame/NierAutomata''. They also made Proton an open-source project for good measure, so others can contribute ideas and code if need be. This had the benefit of letting Valve add in extra projects into Proton later on down the line, such as [=D9VK=] (converting [=Direct3D=] 9 games to Vulkan) and [=F-Audio=] (an [=X-audio=] replacement to fix games with broken support for it.). Valve also allowed it to run non-Steam games in Linux should you be so inclined.

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On August 21st, 2018, Valve released an upgrade to its "Steam Play" feature for the [[UsefulNotes/{{UNIX}} Linux]] portion of its audience, in that it can theoretically let you play ''any Windows game ever released to the platform!'' Steam Play bundles in a fork of the [[UsefulNotes/{{WINE}} Wine]] project, a [=Direct3D=] 10/ 11 compatibility layer called [=DXVK=], as well as a few custom fixes from both projects to make this project work in harmony. Valve has called this project "Proton", and released it alongside 21 officially supported games, such as ''VideoGame/Doom2016'' and ''VideoGame/NierAutomata''. They also made Proton an open-source project for good measure, so others can contribute ideas and code if need be. This had the benefit of letting Valve add in extra projects into Proton later on down the line, such as adding in [=D9VK=] (converting [=Direct3D=] 9 games to Vulkan) and Vulkan, which itself was merged into the above-mentioned [=DXVK=]), [=F-Audio=] (an [=X-audio=] replacement to fix games with broken audio support for it.). it), and [=VKD3D=] (converting [=Direct3D=] 12 games into Vulkan). Valve also allowed allows it to run non-Steam games in Linux Linux, should you be so inclined.


Compare and contrast with UsefulNotes/{{Desura}}, [[Creator/ElectronicArts EA's Origin]] and Website/GOGDotCom.

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Compare and contrast with UsefulNotes/{{Desura}}, [[Creator/ElectronicArts EA's Origin]] and Website/GOGDotCom.Website/GogDotCom.


On August 21st, 2018, Valve released an upgrade to its "Steam Play" feature for the [[UsefulNotes/{{UNIX}} Linux]] portion of its audience, in that it can theoretically let you play ''any Windows game ever released to the platform!'' Steam Play bundles in a fork of the [[UsefulNotes/{{WINE}} Wine]] project, a [=Direct3D=] 10/ 11 compatibility layer called [=DXVK=], as well as a few custom fixes from both projects to make this project work in harmony. Valve has called this project "Proton", and released it alongside 21 officially supported games, such as ''VideoGame/Doom2016'' and ''VideoGame/NierAutomata''. They also made Proton an open-source project for good measure, so others can contribute ideas and code if need be, and also allowed it to run non-Steam games in Linux.

to:

On August 21st, 2018, Valve released an upgrade to its "Steam Play" feature for the [[UsefulNotes/{{UNIX}} Linux]] portion of its audience, in that it can theoretically let you play ''any Windows game ever released to the platform!'' Steam Play bundles in a fork of the [[UsefulNotes/{{WINE}} Wine]] project, a [=Direct3D=] 10/ 11 compatibility layer called [=DXVK=], as well as a few custom fixes from both projects to make this project work in harmony. Valve has called this project "Proton", and released it alongside 21 officially supported games, such as ''VideoGame/Doom2016'' and ''VideoGame/NierAutomata''. They also made Proton an open-source project for good measure, so others can contribute ideas and code if need be, be. This had the benefit of letting Valve add in extra projects into Proton later on down the line, such as [=D9VK=] (converting [=Direct3D=] 9 games to Vulkan) and [=F-Audio=] (an [=X-audio=] replacement to fix games with broken support for it.). Valve also allowed it to run non-Steam games in Linux.
Linux should you be so inclined.


On August 21st, 2018, Valve released an upgrade to its "Steam Play" feature for the [[UsefulNotes/{{UNIX}} Linux]] portion of its audience, in that it can theoretically let you play ''any Windows game ever released to the platform!'' Steam Play bundles in a fork of the [[UsefulNotes/{{WINE}} Wine]] project, a [=Direct3D=] 10/ 11 compatibility layer called [=DXVK=], as well as a few custom fixes from both projects to make this project work in harmony. Valve has called this project "Proton", and released it alongside 21 officially supported games, such as ''VideoGame/{{Doom2016}}'' and ''VideoGame/NierAutomata''. They also made Proton an open-source project for good measure, so others can contribute ideas and code if need be, and also allowed it to run non-Steam games in Linux.

to:

On August 21st, 2018, Valve released an upgrade to its "Steam Play" feature for the [[UsefulNotes/{{UNIX}} Linux]] portion of its audience, in that it can theoretically let you play ''any Windows game ever released to the platform!'' Steam Play bundles in a fork of the [[UsefulNotes/{{WINE}} Wine]] project, a [=Direct3D=] 10/ 11 compatibility layer called [=DXVK=], as well as a few custom fixes from both projects to make this project work in harmony. Valve has called this project "Proton", and released it alongside 21 officially supported games, such as ''VideoGame/{{Doom2016}}'' ''VideoGame/Doom2016'' and ''VideoGame/NierAutomata''. They also made Proton an open-source project for good measure, so others can contribute ideas and code if need be, and also allowed it to run non-Steam games in Linux.


On August 21st, 2018, Valve released an upgrade to its "Steam Play" feature for the [[UsefulNotes/{{UNIX}} Linux]] portion of its audience, in that it can theoretically let you play ''any Windows game ever released to the platform!'' Steam Play bundles in a fork of the [[UsefulNotes/{{WINE}} Wine]] project, a [=Direct3D=] 10/ 11 compatibility layer called [=DXVK=], as well as a few custom fixes from both projects to make this project work in harmony. Valve has called this project "Proton", and released it alongside 21 officially supported games, such as [[VideoGame/{{Doom2016}} ''DOOM (2016)'']] and ''VideoGame/NierAutomata''. They also made Proton an open-source project for good measure, so others can contribute ideas and code if need be, and also allowed it to run non-Steam games in Linux.

to:

On August 21st, 2018, Valve released an upgrade to its "Steam Play" feature for the [[UsefulNotes/{{UNIX}} Linux]] portion of its audience, in that it can theoretically let you play ''any Windows game ever released to the platform!'' Steam Play bundles in a fork of the [[UsefulNotes/{{WINE}} Wine]] project, a [=Direct3D=] 10/ 11 compatibility layer called [=DXVK=], as well as a few custom fixes from both projects to make this project work in harmony. Valve has called this project "Proton", and released it alongside 21 officially supported games, such as [[VideoGame/{{Doom2016}} ''DOOM (2016)'']] ''VideoGame/{{Doom2016}}'' and ''VideoGame/NierAutomata''. They also made Proton an open-source project for good measure, so others can contribute ideas and code if need be, and also allowed it to run non-Steam games in Linux.


On August 21st, 2018, Valve released an upgrade to its "Steam Play" feature for the [[UsefulNotes/{{UNIX}} Linux]] portion of its audience, in that it can theoretically let you play ''any Windows game ever released to the platform!'' Steam Play bundles in a fork of the [[UsefulNotes/{{WINE}} Wine]] project, a [=Direct3D=] 10/ 11 compatibility layer called [=DXVK=], as well as a few custom fixes from both projects to make this "magic sauce" work in harmony. Valve has called this magic package "Proton", and released it alongside 21 officially supported games, such as [[VideoGame/{{Doom2016}} ''DOOM (2016)'']] and ''VideoGame/NierAutomata''. They also made Proton an open-source project for good measure, so others can contribute ideas and code if need be, and also allowed it to run non-Steam games in Linux.

to:

On August 21st, 2018, Valve released an upgrade to its "Steam Play" feature for the [[UsefulNotes/{{UNIX}} Linux]] portion of its audience, in that it can theoretically let you play ''any Windows game ever released to the platform!'' Steam Play bundles in a fork of the [[UsefulNotes/{{WINE}} Wine]] project, a [=Direct3D=] 10/ 11 compatibility layer called [=DXVK=], as well as a few custom fixes from both projects to make this "magic sauce" project work in harmony. Valve has called this magic package project "Proton", and released it alongside 21 officially supported games, such as [[VideoGame/{{Doom2016}} ''DOOM (2016)'']] and ''VideoGame/NierAutomata''. They also made Proton an open-source project for good measure, so others can contribute ideas and code if need be, and also allowed it to run non-Steam games in Linux.


On March 2018, Valve announced a successor to the Steam Link, by taking the idea to its logical endpoint, and making it an Android app, with an iOS app being delayed due to Apple not allowing for game purchasing in apps that they themselves don't sell. The app is currently in Beta. On March 2019, a year after the android apps release, "Steam Link Anywhere" was introduced into beta, as a way of playing games from your Steam PC from ''[[UpToEleven anywhere]]'' that has an internet connection, be it an internet cafe, local library, or a restaurant.

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On March 2018, Valve announced a successor to the Steam Link, by taking the idea to its logical endpoint, and making it an Android app, with an iOS app being delayed due to Apple not allowing for game purchasing in apps that they themselves don't sell. The app is currently in Beta. On March 2019, a year after the android apps release, "Steam Link Anywhere" was introduced into beta, as a way of playing games from your Steam PC from ''[[UpToEleven anywhere]]'' that has an internet connection, be it an internet cafe, local library, or a restaurant.
restaurant. In May 2019, [=iOS=] ''finally'' added the Steam Link to the app store on the Apple [=TV=] and their iOS devices.


In February 2017, Steam Greenlight was scrapped in favour of Steam Direct. While Greenlight's quality control had long been...non existant to say the least, it has been noted that Direct approves ''even more'' games than Greenlight, and effectively removes any attempt at quality control, however half-hearted, since Direct is almost entirely automated. Games that are ridiculously broken or ''deliberately'' offensive (such as simulating a school shooting - ''badly'') are becoming increasingly common. Additionally, the opinion that Valve is not as greedy as its competitors is rapidly becoming viewed as 'naive'.

to:

In February 2017, Steam Greenlight was scrapped in favour of Steam Direct. While Greenlight's quality control had long been...non existant existent to say the least, it has been noted that Direct approves ''even more'' games than Greenlight, and effectively removes any attempt at quality control, however half-hearted, since Direct is almost entirely automated. Games that are ridiculously broken or ''deliberately'' offensive (such as simulating a school shooting - ''badly'') are becoming increasingly common. Additionally, the opinion that Valve is not as greedy as its competitors is rapidly becoming viewed as 'naive'.
automated.



On June 6th, 2018, Valve announced they will now allow anything that isn't illegal or trolling to be on Steam, with [[BrokenBase mixed reactions from both its fans and critics]], with some seeing this as letting down their customers by giving up on quality and others seeing it as standing by their customers by supporting free speech.

to:

On June 6th, 2018, Valve announced they will now allow anything that isn't illegal or trolling to be on Steam, with [[BrokenBase mixed reactions from both its fans and critics]], with some seeing this as letting down their customers by giving up on quality and others seeing it as standing by their customers by supporting free speech.Steam.



On October 2018, continuing the controversy resulting from the "allow anything that isn't illegal or trolling to be on Steam" including embarrassing incidents in around July and August where Valve pulls ''bitcoin miners disguised as cheap games snuck into the platform'' after several Youtubers discovered it, Valve purged hundreds of what they called "game-shaped objects" or what most people know as UsefulNotes/{{Shovelware}}.

to:

On October 2018, continuing the controversy resulting from the "allow anything that isn't illegal or trolling to be on Steam" including embarrassing incidents in around July and August where Valve pulls ''bitcoin miners disguised as cheap games snuck into the platform'' after several Youtubers discovered it, Valve purged hundreds of what they called "game-shaped objects" or what most people know as UsefulNotes/{{Shovelware}}.


In 2013, Steam introduced RPGElements and a CollectibleCardGame, of all things. Shortly before its 2013 Summer Sale, trading cards were introduced to several games (with the Summer Sale, not coincidentally, introducing them to many more), which are collected by playing (or [[LoopholeAbuse sitting at the main menu of]]) the game in question. A full set of these cards (which require either trading with friends or [[BribingYourWayToVictory a trip to the Steam Market to pick them up from other Steam users]] to obtain) earns you a badge based on that game and Steam XP, which increases your Steam level. Increasing your Steam Level is largely a BraggingRightsReward, but also unlocks friends list slots and profile customization options. In addition, themed profile backgrounds and emoticons can be earned by crafting game badges. The community is [[BrokenBase split into a few camps]] on this feature: Some decry it as a [[MoneyDearBoy gimmicky cash-grab]], some have taken to playing the market for cash, some have given a collective shrug, and others have eagerly dove into the new feature, now finally having motivation to play the extensive games collections they purchased during Steam's deep-discount periods.

to:

In 2013, Steam introduced RPGElements and a CollectibleCardGame, of all things. Shortly before its 2013 Summer Sale, trading cards were introduced to several games (with the Summer Sale, not coincidentally, introducing them to many more), which are collected by playing (or [[LoopholeAbuse sitting at the main menu of]]) the game in question. A full set of these cards (which require either trading with friends or [[BribingYourWayToVictory a trip to the Steam Market to pick them up from other Steam users]] to obtain) earns you a badge based on that game and Steam XP, which increases your Steam level. Increasing your Steam Level is largely a BraggingRightsReward, but also unlocks friends list slots and profile customization options. In addition, themed profile backgrounds and emoticons can be earned by crafting game badges. The community is [[BrokenBase split into a few camps]] on this feature: Some decry it as a [[MoneyDearBoy gimmicky cash-grab]], some have taken to playing the market for cash, some have given a collective shrug, and others have eagerly dove into the new feature, now finally having motivation to play the extensive games collections they purchased during Steam's deep-discount periods.
badges.


On August 21st, 2018, Valve released an upgrade to its "Steam Play" feature for the [[UsefulNotes/{{UNIX}} Linux]] portion of its audience, in that it can theoretically let you play ''any Windows game ever released to the platform!'' Steam Play bundles in a fork of the [[UsefulNotes/{{WINE}} Wine]] project, a [=Direct3D=] 10/ 11/ 12 compatibility layer called [=DXVK=], as well as a few custom fixes from both projects to make this "magic sauce" work in harmony. Valve has called this magic package "Proton", and released it alongside 21 officially supported games, such as [[VideoGame/{{Doom2016}} ''DOOM (2016)'']] and ''VideoGame/NierAutomata''. They also made Proton an open-source project for good measure, so others can contribute ideas and code if need be and integrated to run non-Steam games in Linux.

to:

On August 21st, 2018, Valve released an upgrade to its "Steam Play" feature for the [[UsefulNotes/{{UNIX}} Linux]] portion of its audience, in that it can theoretically let you play ''any Windows game ever released to the platform!'' Steam Play bundles in a fork of the [[UsefulNotes/{{WINE}} Wine]] project, a [=Direct3D=] 10/ 11/ 12 11 compatibility layer called [=DXVK=], as well as a few custom fixes from both projects to make this "magic sauce" work in harmony. Valve has called this magic package "Proton", and released it alongside 21 officially supported games, such as [[VideoGame/{{Doom2016}} ''DOOM (2016)'']] and ''VideoGame/NierAutomata''. They also made Proton an open-source project for good measure, so others can contribute ideas and code if need be be, and integrated also allowed it to run non-Steam games in Linux.

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