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* ''Film/{{Amigo}}'' (2010) is an indie production about a "typical" battle of the Philippine-American war, featuring a village chief torn between collaborating with the American invaders and assisting his brother who has joined LaResistance.

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* ''Film/{{Amigo}}'' (2010) is an indie production about a "typical" battle of the Philippine-American war, featuring a village chief head torn between collaborating with the American invaders and assisting his brother who has joined LaResistance.

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** And its sequel, ''Film/GoyoAngBatangHeneral'' (2018), about the "Boy General" Gregorio del Pilar, one of the right-hand men of the Filipino revolutionary leader, and republican president, Emilio Aguinaldo.


* ''Film/{{Posse}}'' opens in Cuba during the Spanish-American War. Colonel Graham orders the 10th to rob Spanish gold shipmen; planning to use this as an excuse to brand them deserters and execute them. The 10th escape with the gold, and Graham and his men chase them across the WildWest.

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* ''Film/{{Posse}}'' opens in Cuba during the Spanish-American War. Colonel Graham orders the 10th to rob a Spanish gold shipmen; shipment; planning to use this as an excuse to brand them deserters and execute them. The 10th escape with the gold, and Graham and his men chase them across the WildWest.


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* In ''Film/{{Hardcase}}'', the protagonist Jack Rutherford is a veteran of the Spanish-American War who was declared missing in action. He was actually a prisoner-of-war, and by the time he is realeased and returns home, he finds his wife has sold their ranch and run off with a Mexican revolutionary. He goes after her and gets caught up in the early days of UsefulNotes/TheMexicanRevolution.


While Spain's giving up Cuba was the original ''casus belli'', the US ended up demanding the same deal for all of Spain's overseas colonies. The people of Puerto Rico also took the opportunity to demand independence, for instance, as did the peoples of the Philippines - who were already in open revolt and had established a provisional government which the US negotiated with. US naval power was employed to great effect, though the performance of the US Army, which had been underfunded in the post-Civil War Reconstruction and whose only experience for the past three decades had been assymetrical warfare against the Indians, was hampered by inexperience, hasty training, and inferior equipment - the Spanish troops carried Mauser repeating rifles employing modern ("smokeless") powder, while National Guard and volunteer units in the US Army largely still used Springfield "Trapdoor" single-shot black-powder rifles [[note]] The United States had adopted two modern(ish) bolt-action rifles that used smokeless cartridges, the 6mm Lee Navy (otherwise known as the Remington-Lee) for the Navy and Marines, and the .30-40 Krag-Jorgensen M1895 for the Army, both of which were inferior to the Mauser in different ways. However the US Military received, at best, lackadaisical funding for most of the three decades between the Civil and Span-Am Wars, so actual procurement of these rifles hadnít gone very far. Krag production picked up dramatically as a result of this conflict, but the Lee Navy remained a RareGun[[/note]], [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin which gave off dark clouds of gunpowder when fired]], and the US artillery was equipped with Civil war cannon converted to breechloaders. American and Cuban Revolutionary forces soon worked together to make good use of their numerical superiority over the Spanish loyalist and government forces, however. The infamous Charge at San Juan Hill[[note]] The Rough Riders actually assaulted adjacent Kettle Hill. San Juan Hill was taken by the Buffalo Soldiers of the 10th Cavalry in a charge led by Black Jack Pershing[[/note]] (in which future US President UsefulNotes/TheodoreRoosevelt first attained national fame) and the Battle of Manila Bay[[note]] It should be noted that the US Navy was praised for its seamanship, but regarded as a laughingstock for its [[ImperialStormtrooperMarksmanshipAcademy gunnery]]. The Spanish Royal Navy, however, was even ''[[EpicFail worse]]''. American ships missed most of their shots. Spanish ships seemed to have a hard time hitting ''the ocean''. At Manila Bay, the only American fatality was due to heat stroke[[/note]], a CurbStompBattle if ever there was one, are good illustrations of the course of the war at large. This came as a surprise to much of the world, as the popular expectation had been for the Spanish Empire to mop the floor with the Americans.

to:

While Spain's giving up Cuba was the original ''casus belli'', the US ended up demanding the same deal for all of Spain's overseas colonies. The people of Puerto Rico also took the opportunity to demand independence, for instance, as did the peoples of the Philippines - who were already in open revolt and had established a provisional government which the US negotiated with. US naval power was employed to great effect, though the performance of the US Army, which had been underfunded in the post-Civil War Reconstruction and whose only experience for the past three decades had been assymetrical warfare against the Indians, was hampered by inexperience, hasty training, and inferior equipment - the Spanish troops carried Mauser repeating rifles employing modern ("smokeless") powder, while National Guard and volunteer units in the US Army largely still used Springfield "Trapdoor" single-shot black-powder rifles [[note]] The United States had adopted two modern(ish) bolt-action rifles that used smokeless cartridges, the 6mm Lee Navy (otherwise known as the Remington-Lee) for the Navy and Marines, and the .30-40 Krag-Jorgensen M1895 for the Army, both of which were inferior to the Mauser in different ways. However the US Military received, at best, lackadaisical funding for most of the three decades between the Civil and Span-Am Wars, so actual procurement of these rifles hadnít gone very far. Krag production picked up dramatically as a result of this conflict, but the Lee Navy remained a RareGun[[/note]], [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin which gave off dark clouds of gunpowder when fired]], and the US artillery was equipped with Civil war cannon converted to breechloaders. American and Cuban Revolutionary forces soon worked together to make good use of their numerical superiority over the Spanish loyalist and government forces, however. The infamous Charge at San Juan Hill[[note]] The Rough Riders actually assaulted adjacent Kettle Hill. San Juan Hill was taken by the Buffalo Soldiers of the 10th Cavalry in a charge led by Black Jack Pershing[[/note]] (in which future US President UsefulNotes/TheodoreRoosevelt first attained national fame) and the Battle of Manila Bay[[note]] It should be noted that the US Navy was praised for its seamanship, but regarded as a laughingstock for its [[ImperialStormtrooperMarksmanshipAcademy gunnery]]. The Spanish Royal Navy, however, was even ''[[EpicFail worse]]''. American ships missed most of their shots. Spanish ships seemed to have a hard time hitting ''the ocean''. At Manila Bay, the only American fatality was due to heat stroke[[/note]], a CurbStompBattle if ever there was one, are good illustrations of the course of the war at large. This came as a surprise to much of the world, as the popular expectation had been for the Spanish Empire to mop the floor with the Americans.


Through the mid-to-late 19th century, Cuban nationalism and separatism was on the rise. The result, given Spain's utter reluctance to let the colony go, was inevitably violent. Uprisings were attempted, but they were all crushed with varying degrees of brutality. ''All'', that is, with the exception of the very last one; in 1898, with half the entire island in-revolt, it looked as if Cuba ''really would'' gain her independence. In the midst of this process, the USS ''Maine'' (an American armored cruiser sent to [[GunboatDiplomacy implicitly threaten Spain with war if they didn't hurry up and give Cuba to the USA]]) blew up and sank in Havana Harbor. The US quickly seized upon this opportunity to intervene in the war before the rebellion could throw the Spanish out entirely and declare independence, with the US's investigation into the incident implicating the Spanish - who were quite right to have stated that it was a tragic US Navy accident at best (probably due to a coal fire) and a WoundedGazelleGambit at worst.

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Through the mid-to-late 19th century, Cuban nationalism and separatism was on the rise. The result, given Spain's utter reluctance to let the colony go, was inevitably violent. Uprisings were attempted, but they were all crushed with varying degrees of brutality. ''All'', that is, with the exception of the very last one; in 1898, with half the entire island in-revolt, it looked as if Cuba ''really would'' gain her independence. In the midst of this process, the USS ''Maine'' (an American armored cruiser sent to [[GunboatDiplomacy implicitly threaten Spain with war if they didn't hurry up and give Cuba to the USA]]) blew up and sank in Havana Harbor. The US quickly seized upon this opportunity to intervene in the war before the rebellion could throw the Spanish out entirely and declare independence, with the US's investigation into the incident implicating the Spanish - who were quite right to have stated that it was a tragic US Navy accident at best (probably due to a coal fire) fire)[[note]] This theory has been vindicated by multiple investigations by the US Navy, from the initial inquiry to an exhaustive one commissioned by Admiral Hyman Rickover in the 1970s using modern analysis of eyewitness accounts and forensic evidence of ''Maine'''s salvaged wreckage. The only major point of contention is whether the coal fire was the result of operator error by the crew or an electrical short[[/note]] and a WoundedGazelleGambit at worst.worst[[note]] This view is propagated by the [[UnreliableNarrator Castro regime]] with little, if any, supporting evidence[[/note]].



While Spain's giving up Cuba was the original ''casus belli'', the US ended up demanding the same deal for all of Spain's overseas colonies. The people of Puerto Rico also took the opportunity to demand independence, for instance, as did the peoples of the Philippines - who were already in open revolt and had established a provisional government which the US negotiated with. US naval power was employed to great effect, though the performance of the US Army, which had been underfunded in the post-Civil War Reconstruction and whose only experience for the past three decades had been assymetrical warfare against the Indians, was hampered by inexperience, hasty training, and inferior equipment - the Spanish troops carried Mauser repeating rifles employing modern ("smokeless") powder, while National Guard and volunteer units in the US Army largely still used Springfield "Trapdoor" single-shot black-powder rifles [[note]] The United States had adopted two modern(ish) bolt-action rifles that used smokeless cartridges, the 6mm Lee Navy (otherwise known as the Remington-Lee) for the Navy and Marines, and the .30-40 Krag-Jorgensen M1895 for the Army, both of which were inferior to the Mauser in different ways. However the US Military received, at best, lackadaisical funding for most of the three decades between the Civil and Span-Am Wars, so actual procurement of these rifles hadnít gone very far. Krag production picked up dramatically as a result of this conflict, but the Lee Navy remained a RareGun[[/note]], [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin which gave off dark clouds of gunpowder when fired]], and the US artillery was equipped with Civil war cannon converted to breechloaders. American and Cuban Revolutionary forces soon worked together to make good use of their numerical superiority over the Spanish loyalist and government forces, however. The infamous Charge at San Juan Hill[[note]] The Rough Riders actually assaulted adjacent Kettle Hill. San Juan Hill was taken by the Buffalo Soldiers of the 10th Cavalry in a charge led by Black Jack Pershing[[/note]] (in which future US President UsefulNotes/TheodoreRoosevelt first attained national fame) and the Battle of Manila Bay[[note]] It should be noted that the US Navy was praised for its seamanship, but regarded as a laughingstock for its [[ImperialStormtrooperMarksmanshipAcademy gunnery]]. The Spanish Royal Navy, however, was even ''[[EpicFail worse]]''. American ships missed most of their shots. Spanish ships seemed to have a hard time hitting ''the ocean''. At Manila Bay, the only American casualty was due to heat stroke[[/note]], a CurbStompBattle if ever there was one, are good illustrations of the course of the war at large. This came as a surprise to much of the world, as the popular expectation had been for the Spanish Empire to mop the floor with the Americans.

to:

While Spain's giving up Cuba was the original ''casus belli'', the US ended up demanding the same deal for all of Spain's overseas colonies. The people of Puerto Rico also took the opportunity to demand independence, for instance, as did the peoples of the Philippines - who were already in open revolt and had established a provisional government which the US negotiated with. US naval power was employed to great effect, though the performance of the US Army, which had been underfunded in the post-Civil War Reconstruction and whose only experience for the past three decades had been assymetrical warfare against the Indians, was hampered by inexperience, hasty training, and inferior equipment - the Spanish troops carried Mauser repeating rifles employing modern ("smokeless") powder, while National Guard and volunteer units in the US Army largely still used Springfield "Trapdoor" single-shot black-powder rifles [[note]] The United States had adopted two modern(ish) bolt-action rifles that used smokeless cartridges, the 6mm Lee Navy (otherwise known as the Remington-Lee) for the Navy and Marines, and the .30-40 Krag-Jorgensen M1895 for the Army, both of which were inferior to the Mauser in different ways. However the US Military received, at best, lackadaisical funding for most of the three decades between the Civil and Span-Am Wars, so actual procurement of these rifles hadnít gone very far. Krag production picked up dramatically as a result of this conflict, but the Lee Navy remained a RareGun[[/note]], [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin which gave off dark clouds of gunpowder when fired]], and the US artillery was equipped with Civil war cannon converted to breechloaders. American and Cuban Revolutionary forces soon worked together to make good use of their numerical superiority over the Spanish loyalist and government forces, however. The infamous Charge at San Juan Hill[[note]] The Rough Riders actually assaulted adjacent Kettle Hill. San Juan Hill was taken by the Buffalo Soldiers of the 10th Cavalry in a charge led by Black Jack Pershing[[/note]] (in which future US President UsefulNotes/TheodoreRoosevelt first attained national fame) and the Battle of Manila Bay[[note]] It should be noted that the US Navy was praised for its seamanship, but regarded as a laughingstock for its [[ImperialStormtrooperMarksmanshipAcademy gunnery]]. The Spanish Royal Navy, however, was even ''[[EpicFail worse]]''. American ships missed most of their shots. Spanish ships seemed to have a hard time hitting ''the ocean''. At Manila Bay, the only American casualty fatality was due to heat stroke[[/note]], a CurbStompBattle if ever there was one, are good illustrations of the course of the war at large. This came as a surprise to much of the world, as the popular expectation had been for the Spanish Empire to mop the floor with the Americans.

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[[quoteright:325:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/spanishamericanwarpropaganda.JPG]]
[[caption-width-right:325:''"Remember the Maine, to Hell with Spain!"'']]


!!Tropes involving the Spanish-American War include:

* ATeamFiring: American gunnery at the Battle of Manila Bay was embarrassingly horrible. It's estimated that of some 4000-6000 rounds of ammunition fired by Dewey's fleet, only about 2%-3%, or 80-141 rounds, actually hit the enemy. A (mostly) stationary enemy. And still the Spanish lost--their gunnery was even ''worse,'' and many shells failed to explode even if they hit something. To the American fleet's credit when the Spanish flagship ''Reina Christina'' attempted to ram Commodore's Dewey's own flagship ''Olympia'', it was shot to pieces.
* TheCaptain: Commodore Dewey quickly became the archetype of a naval hero for the US.
* ColonelBadass: Colonel UsefulNotes/TheodoreRoosevelt, United States Army.
* CoolShip: The USS ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Olympia_(C-6) Olympia]]''. Also, the USS ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Maine_(ACR-1) Maine]]'' [[AsYouKnow before she sank]]. USS ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Vesuvius_(1888) Vesuvius]]'' merits a listing for her unique armament of three pneumatic guns.
* CurbStompBattle:
** The entire war; Spain had long since been a VestigialEmpire, holding on to their last bit of imperial hubris in spite of several rebellions. The United States, on the other hand, was a very large, prosperous, wealthy, and powerful up-and-coming world power. The war was over in less than three months.
** The butcher's bill doesn't lie. Spanish casualties were 800 killed, 700 wounded, 40,000 captured, and 15,000 dead of disease, for a total of 56,500 casualties. American casualties were 297 killed, 1,645 wounded, 11 captured, and 2,061 dead of disease, for a total of 4,000 casualties. Also the Spanish lost 11 cruisers, 2 destroyers, and 6 other ships, while the Americans lost no ships whatsoever.
** The Battle of Manila Bay. With the sole American casualty due to heat stroke. The Battle at Santiago De Cuba had similar results, with only two American casualties.
** A rather hilarious and bloodless one occurred at the capture of Guam by the Cruiser USS ''Charleston''. She charged at full speed into the main harbor, firing a challenge salvo at the Spanish in Fort Santa Cruz; the leader of the Spanish garrison abruptly rowed out to the Charleston and apologized for not having any gunpowder to return what HE thought was a saluting gesture[[note]] In the days of WoodenShipsAndIronMen, it was standard practice for a warship entering a foreign port to fire a full salvo of all of of her guns with blank charges (gunpowder, but no projectile) as she passed by the harbor's fort. This "saluting broadside" demonstrated to the fort's garrison that the foreign warship had cleared all of her guns and thus had no hostile intent. The fort would then load and fire a salvo of blank charges from its own heavy guns, signaling that the warship has permission to peacefully enter the harbor. This tradition was carried in modified form into the 20th Century, with warships often carrying a dedicated "saluting gun" that ''couldn't'' fire a real warshot[[/note]], because he [[IgnoredVitalNewsReports had no idea war had been declared]]. ''Charleston'' proceeded to take him prisoner (he had a cordial lunch with the ship's captain) and the whole barrack surrendered the next day. In the Spanish's defense, [[PoorCommunicationKills news didn't travel very fast back then.]]
* CustomUniform: The Rough Riders' uniform. Because of shortages of uniforms, the men in this regiment had to do with blue wool uniforms, impractical in the tropical weather of Cuba. It was combined with a campaign hat and a scarf. Theodore Roosevelt managed to somehow get them issued modern Krag repeating carbines; other volunteer units carried single-shot black powder "Trap Door" Springfields.
* EndOfAnAge: The end of four hundred years of Spanish colonial rule in the Americas, dating all the way back to UsefulNotes/ChristopherColumbus. Granted, Spain had already lost most of its colonies by this point, but this is when they finally lost their last ones in the New World (and in the Pacific). Fittingly enough, it's also the DawnOfAnEra -- the era in which the United States is one of the world's major powers.
* ExpandedStatesOfAmerica: The Philippines, Guam, and Puerto Rico were annexed as commonwealths. While the Americans voluntarily and peacefully granted the Philippines "independence" in 1946, Puerto Rico and Guam remain US territories. Recent polls have shown that they prefer to keep it that way.
** Meanwhile, there are Filipinos so enamoured with the US colonial experience that many of them actually wish they were ''back under American rule'', if not outright annexed as the 51st state (plus perhaps a few more states, given the relatively huge Filipino population).
* ForgottenTrope: Or rather, forgotten ''war'': The wider Cuban and Philippine Wars saw the US fight against the Filipinos for three years, cost 4500 American lives, involved the Spanish and then the US building some of the world's first "concentration camps" (which in fairness were not the horrible death centers of [[UsefulNotes/TheHolocaust 40 years later]] but rather extremely uncomfortable and rather degrading spots to "concentrate" the enemy; the British [[UsefulNotes/TheSecondBoerWar were doing the same thing]] in UsefulNotes/SouthAfrica) and numerous atrocities on both sides (which is what inspired Twain to become an anti-Imperialist in the first place).
* FixedForwardFacingWeapon: The USS ''Vesuvius'' was a Dynamite Gun Cruiser, and armed with a trio of 15 inch pneumatic guns in her bow, fixed at a 16 degree elevation. These guns used pressurized air to launch hollow steel or brass projectiles loaded with up to 500 pounds of blasting gelatin[[note]]the explosives were [[MadeOfExplodium far too unstable]] to be fired from a standard gun[[/note]] at targets up to 4,000 yards away. While this was rather more limited in range than conventional guns, the ''Vesuvius's'' guns were also much quieter, allowing her to be used for sneak attacks against coastal targets.
* TheGayNineties: For Spain and her last colonies.
* PaperTiger: On paper, the Spanish deployed over three times as many soldiers as the Americans in the war (261,000 vs 72,339). In reality, [[EasyLogistics supply issues]], low morale, ongoing insurgencies, and the reality of fighting on islands against an opponent with naval superiority meant that most of these troops were ineffective. The Americans only lost a few hundred men in combat in Cuba before the encircled Spaniards started surrendering en masse by the tens of thousands, while also dying of disease or malnutrition by the tens of thousands.
* SmallReferencePools: When it's lucky enough to be remembered at all, the Spanish-American War consists entirely of Teddy Roosevelt being a Rough Rider, "Remember the Maine", and (optional) Hearst's crazy yellow journalism.
* TwilightOfTheOldWest:
** This war was the last one in which the US Army (or some of it) fought in blue uniforms, and National Guard regiments still carried black-powder weapons much like those used in the (just barely over) Indian Wars. UsefulNotes/TheodoreRoosevelt's Rough Rider regiment included many actual cowboys (and a few Indians), as well.
** The US Army also had veterans of the US Civil War (which had ended about 33 years previously). Both William Shafter and Nelson Miles, who commanded the Cuban and Puerto Rican expeditions respectively, had served in the Union Army. Shafter's cavalry commander was Major General Joseph Wheeler, a former ''Confederate'' General and, at the time of the Spanish-American War, a member of the US Congress. He is reported to have said, while leading US troops, "Let's go, boys! We've got the damn Yankees on the run again!"
* WakeUpCallBoss: Even though the war was a quick American victory, the poor performance of the army in certain battles caused the government to sink more money into modernizing them. Similarly, the terrible accuracy of the Navy at Manila Bay demonstrated the need for more gunnery training and better systems of fire control and coordination of ships.
* WarIsHell: During the Battle at Santiago De Cuba, the Spanish armored cruiser ''Viscaya'' was fatally damaged after a long-running battle against the American North Atlantic Squadron and Flying Squadron. As the crewmen of the USS ''Texas'' looked on and cheered, their captain shouted them down:
-->'''Captain John Woodward Philip''': Don't cheer boys! Those poor devils are dying.
* YourTerroristsAreOurFreedomFighters: The respective attitudes of Spain and the USA regarding the Cuban rebels, and subsequently inverted regarding the USA and the Philippine Insurrection.


* OldShame: The USA's behavior in the Philippines was, in hindsight, pretty terrible, and the Filipinos werenít much better, which might be why it's almost never brought up nowadays.


** A rather hilarious and bloodless one occurred at the capture of Guam by the USS Charleston. She charged at full speed into the main harbor, firing a challenge salvo at the Spanish in Fort Santa Cruz; the leader of the Spanish garrison abruptly rowed out to the Charleston and apologized for not having any gunpowder to return what HE thought was a saluting gesture[[note]] In the days of WoodenShipsAndIronMen, it was standard practice for a warship entering a foreign port to fire a full salvo of all of of her guns with blank charges (gunpowder, but no projectile) as she passed by the harbor's fort. This "saluting broadside" demonstrated to the fort's garrison that the foreign warship had cleared all of her guns and thus had no hostile intent. The fort would then load and fire a salvo of blank charges from its own heavy guns, signaling that the warship has permission to peacefully enter the harbor. This tradition was carried in modified form into the 20th Century, with warships often carrying a dedicated "saluting gun" that ''couldn't'' fire a real warshot[[/note]], because he [[IgnoredVitalNewsReports had no idea war had been declared]]. The Charleston proceeded to take him prisoner and the whole barrack surrendered the next day. In the Spanish's defense, [[PoorCommunicationKills news didn't travel very fast back then.]]

to:

** A rather hilarious and bloodless one occurred at the capture of Guam by the Cruiser USS Charleston.''Charleston''. She charged at full speed into the main harbor, firing a challenge salvo at the Spanish in Fort Santa Cruz; the leader of the Spanish garrison abruptly rowed out to the Charleston and apologized for not having any gunpowder to return what HE thought was a saluting gesture[[note]] In the days of WoodenShipsAndIronMen, it was standard practice for a warship entering a foreign port to fire a full salvo of all of of her guns with blank charges (gunpowder, but no projectile) as she passed by the harbor's fort. This "saluting broadside" demonstrated to the fort's garrison that the foreign warship had cleared all of her guns and thus had no hostile intent. The fort would then load and fire a salvo of blank charges from its own heavy guns, signaling that the warship has permission to peacefully enter the harbor. This tradition was carried in modified form into the 20th Century, with warships often carrying a dedicated "saluting gun" that ''couldn't'' fire a real warshot[[/note]], because he [[IgnoredVitalNewsReports had no idea war had been declared]]. The Charleston ''Charleston'' proceeded to take him prisoner (he had a cordial lunch with the ship's captain) and the whole barrack surrendered the next day. In the Spanish's defense, [[PoorCommunicationKills news didn't travel very fast back then.]]



** This war was the last one in which the US Army (or some of it) fought in blue uniforms, and National Guard regiments still carried black-powder weapons much like those used in the (just barely over) Indian Wars. UsefulNotes/TheodoreRoosevelt's Rough Rider regiment included many actual cowboys, as well.

to:

** This war was the last one in which the US Army (or some of it) fought in blue uniforms, and National Guard regiments still carried black-powder weapons much like those used in the (just barely over) Indian Wars. UsefulNotes/TheodoreRoosevelt's Rough Rider regiment included many actual cowboys, cowboys (and a few Indians), as well.


** A rather hilarious one occurred at the capture of Guam by the USS Charleston. She charged at full speed into the main harbor, firing a challenge salvo at the Spanish in Fort Santa Cruz; the leader of the Spanish garrison abruptly rowed out to the Charleston and apologized for not having any gunpowder to return what HE thought was a saluting gesture, because he [[IgnoredVitalNewsReports had no idea war had been declared]]. The Charleston proceeded to take him prisoner and the whole barrack surrendered the next day. In the Spanish's defense, [[PoorCommunicationKills news didn't travel very fast back then.]]

to:

** A rather hilarious and bloodless one occurred at the capture of Guam by the USS Charleston. She charged at full speed into the main harbor, firing a challenge salvo at the Spanish in Fort Santa Cruz; the leader of the Spanish garrison abruptly rowed out to the Charleston and apologized for not having any gunpowder to return what HE thought was a saluting gesture, gesture[[note]] In the days of WoodenShipsAndIronMen, it was standard practice for a warship entering a foreign port to fire a full salvo of all of of her guns with blank charges (gunpowder, but no projectile) as she passed by the harbor's fort. This "saluting broadside" demonstrated to the fort's garrison that the foreign warship had cleared all of her guns and thus had no hostile intent. The fort would then load and fire a salvo of blank charges from its own heavy guns, signaling that the warship has permission to peacefully enter the harbor. This tradition was carried in modified form into the 20th Century, with warships often carrying a dedicated "saluting gun" that ''couldn't'' fire a real warshot[[/note]], because he [[IgnoredVitalNewsReports had no idea war had been declared]]. The Charleston proceeded to take him prisoner and the whole barrack surrendered the next day. In the Spanish's defense, [[PoorCommunicationKills news didn't travel very fast back then.]]


* OldShame: The USA's behavior in the Philippines was, in hindsight, pretty terrible, which might be why it's almost never brought up nowadays.

to:

* OldShame: The USA's behavior in the Philippines was, in hindsight, pretty terrible, and the Filipinos werenít much better, which might be why it's almost never brought up nowadays.


While Spain's giving up Cuba was the original ''casus belli'', the US ended up demanding the same deal for all of Spain's overseas colonies. The people of Puerto Rico also took the opportunity to demand independence, for instance, as did the peoples of the Philippines - who were already in open revolt and had established a provisional government which the US negotiated with. US naval power was employed to great effect, though the performance of the US Army was hampered by inexperience, hasty training, and inferior equipment - the Spanish troops carried Mauser repeating rifles employing modern ("smokeless") powder, while National Guard and volunteer units in the US Army still used single-shot 'black-powder' rifles, [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin which gave off dark clouds of gunpowder when fired]], and the US artillery was equipped with Civil war cannon converted to breechloaders. American and Cuban Revolutionary forces soon worked together to make good use of their numerical superiority over the Spanish loyalist and government forces, however. The infamous Charge at San Juan Hill (in which future US President UsefulNotes/TheodoreRoosevelt first attained national fame) and the Battle of Manila Bay, a CurbStompBattle if ever there was one, are good illustrations of the course of the war at large.

to:

While Spain's giving up Cuba was the original ''casus belli'', the US ended up demanding the same deal for all of Spain's overseas colonies. The people of Puerto Rico also took the opportunity to demand independence, for instance, as did the peoples of the Philippines - who were already in open revolt and had established a provisional government which the US negotiated with. US naval power was employed to great effect, though the performance of the US Army Army, which had been underfunded in the post-Civil War Reconstruction and whose only experience for the past three decades had been assymetrical warfare against the Indians, was hampered by inexperience, hasty training, and inferior equipment - the Spanish troops carried Mauser repeating rifles employing modern ("smokeless") powder, while National Guard and volunteer units in the US Army largely still used Springfield "Trapdoor" single-shot 'black-powder' rifles, black-powder rifles [[note]] The United States had adopted two modern(ish) bolt-action rifles that used smokeless cartridges, the 6mm Lee Navy (otherwise known as the Remington-Lee) for the Navy and Marines, and the .30-40 Krag-Jorgensen M1895 for the Army, both of which were inferior to the Mauser in different ways. However the US Military received, at best, lackadaisical funding for most of the three decades between the Civil and Span-Am Wars, so actual procurement of these rifles hadnít gone very far. Krag production picked up dramatically as a result of this conflict, but the Lee Navy remained a RareGun[[/note]], [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin which gave off dark clouds of gunpowder when fired]], and the US artillery was equipped with Civil war cannon converted to breechloaders. American and Cuban Revolutionary forces soon worked together to make good use of their numerical superiority over the Spanish loyalist and government forces, however. The infamous Charge at San Juan Hill[[note]] The Rough Riders actually assaulted adjacent Kettle Hill. San Juan Hill was taken by the Buffalo Soldiers of the 10th Cavalry in a charge led by Black Jack Pershing[[/note]] (in which future US President UsefulNotes/TheodoreRoosevelt first attained national fame) and the Battle of Manila Bay[[note]] It should be noted that the US Navy was praised for its seamanship, but regarded as a laughingstock for its [[ImperialStormtrooperMarksmanshipAcademy gunnery]]. The Spanish Royal Navy, however, was even ''[[EpicFail worse]]''. American ships missed most of their shots. Spanish ships seemed to have a hard time hitting ''the ocean''. At Manila Bay, the only American casualty was due to heat stroke[[/note]], a CurbStompBattle if ever there was one, are good illustrations of the course of the war at large.
large. This came as a surprise to much of the world, as the popular expectation had been for the Spanish Empire to mop the floor with the Americans.


* WarIsHell: During the Battle at Santiago De Cuba, the Spanish armored cruiser ''Viscaya'' was fatally damaged after a long running battle against the American North Atlantic Squadron and Flying Squadron. As the crewmen of the USS ''Texas'' looked on and cheered, their captain shouted them down:

to:

* WarIsHell: During the Battle at Santiago De Cuba, the Spanish armored cruiser ''Viscaya'' was fatally damaged after a long running long-running battle against the American North Atlantic Squadron and Flying Squadron. As the crewmen of the USS ''Texas'' looked on and cheered, their captain shouted them down:



* ''Film/{{Posse}}'' opens in Cuba during the Spanish-American War. Colonel Graham orders the 10th to rob a Spanish gold shipmen; planning to use this as an excuse to brand them deserters and execute them. The 10th escape with the gold, and Graham and his men chase them across the WildWest.

to:

* ''Film/{{Posse}}'' opens in Cuba during the Spanish-American War. Colonel Graham orders the 10th to rob a Spanish gold shipmen; planning to use this as an excuse to brand them deserters and execute them. The 10th escape with the gold, and Graham and his men chase them across the WildWest.WildWest.
* The English version of Music/{{ABBA}}'s "Fernando" is rumored to be about two Mexican veterans of the war, with one of them becoming nostalgic for it when they hear drumming outside.


Through the mid-to-late 19th century, Cuban nationalism and separatism was on the rise. The result, given Spain's utter reluctance to let the colony go, was inevitably violent. Uprisings were attempted, but they were all crushed with varying degrees of brutality. ''All'', that is, with the exception of the very last one; in 1898, with half the entire island in-revolt, it looked as if Cuba ''really would'' gain her independence. In the midst of this process, the USS ''Maine'' (an American armored cruiser sent to [[GunboatDiplomacy implicitly threaten Spain with war if they didn't hurry up and give Cuba to the USA]]) blew up and sank in Havana Harbor. The US quickly seized upon this opportunity to intervene in the war before the rebellion could throw the Spanish out entirely and declare independence, with the US's investigation into the incident implicating the Spanish - who were quite right to have stated that it was a tragic US Navy accident at best (a result of poor ship-design and notoriously lax safety regulations) and a WoundedGazelleGambit at worst.

to:

Through the mid-to-late 19th century, Cuban nationalism and separatism was on the rise. The result, given Spain's utter reluctance to let the colony go, was inevitably violent. Uprisings were attempted, but they were all crushed with varying degrees of brutality. ''All'', that is, with the exception of the very last one; in 1898, with half the entire island in-revolt, it looked as if Cuba ''really would'' gain her independence. In the midst of this process, the USS ''Maine'' (an American armored cruiser sent to [[GunboatDiplomacy implicitly threaten Spain with war if they didn't hurry up and give Cuba to the USA]]) blew up and sank in Havana Harbor. The US quickly seized upon this opportunity to intervene in the war before the rebellion could throw the Spanish out entirely and declare independence, with the US's investigation into the incident implicating the Spanish - who were quite right to have stated that it was a tragic US Navy accident at best (a result of poor ship-design and notoriously lax safety regulations) (probably due to a coal fire) and a WoundedGazelleGambit at worst.

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