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* In an episode of ''Series/HorribleHistories'', Crassus is the subject of a song "I'm Minted", a parody of the Dizzee Rascal song "Bonkers".

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* In an episode of ''Series/HorribleHistories'', Crassus is the subject of a GlamRap song titled "I'm Minted", a parody of the Dizzee Rascal song "Bonkers".


* ''Series/{{Rome}}'': In a conversation with UsefulNotes/{{Cicero}}, Mark Antony makes an ImpliedDeathThreat by mentioning Crassus' fate of having molten gold poured down his throat.

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* ''Series/{{Rome}}'': In a conversation with UsefulNotes/{{Cicero}}, Creator/{{Cicero}}, Mark Antony makes an ImpliedDeathThreat by mentioning Crassus' fate of having molten gold poured down his throat.


He secured the governorship of Syria, not only a very wealthy province, but also near to Parthia, one of the few kingdoms left in the known world not already conquered by the Romans. It seemed an attractive prospect for glory and booty, and Crassus may also have had in mind Pompey's easy victories in the region. Even among the Romans, who never needed much PretextForWar, Crassus' plans to invade Parthia attracted strong opposition. He nevertheless left for the east, and crossed into Parthia with seven legions. However, it had been almost twenty years since Crassus, now 62-years-old, had last seen action during the slave war, the invasion was poorly planned [[note]]Such as, Crassus refusing significant amounts of reinforcements (numbering similarly to his own forces) from Armenia to march toward Parthia as quickly as possible...through the desert.[[/note]], and the Parthians [[MuggingTheMonster were a more formidable foe than expected]]. Crassus' army, mainly consisting of infantry, was easily outmanoeuvred by the Parthian horse archers in the desert and suffered a major defeat at Carrhae - a defeat so bad that the Parthian king thought it made the commander at Carrhae, Surena, look too good and had him executed out of [[GreenEyedMonster envy]].[[note]]Not to be confused with Cannae, the site of another famous Roman defeat, at the hands of Hannibal in 216 BC.[[/note]] Crassus lost heart when he learned that his son Publius had been killed in the fighting. Crassus himself was killed soon after when a fight broke out during a parley with the Parthians.

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He secured the governorship of Syria, not only a very wealthy province, but also near to Parthia, one of the few kingdoms left in the known world not already conquered by the Romans. It seemed an attractive prospect for glory and booty, and Crassus may also have had in mind Pompey's easy victories in the region. Even among the Romans, who never needed much PretextForWar, Crassus' plans to invade Parthia attracted strong opposition. He nevertheless left for the east, and crossed into Parthia with seven legions. However, it had been almost twenty years since Crassus, now 62-years-old, had last seen action during the slave war, the invasion was poorly planned [[note]]Such as, Crassus refusing [[note]]Crassus refused significant amounts of reinforcements (numbering similarly to his own forces) from Armenia to march toward Parthia as quickly as possible...possible... through the desert.[[/note]], and the Parthians [[MuggingTheMonster were a more formidable foe than expected]]. Crassus' army, mainly consisting of infantry, was easily outmanoeuvred by the Parthian horse archers in the desert and suffered a major defeat at Carrhae - a Carrhae[[note]]Not to be confused with Cannae, the site of another famous Roman defeat, at the hands of Hannibal in 216 BC.[[/note]]. The defeat was so bad that the Parthian king thought it made the commander at Carrhae, Surena, look too good and had him executed out of [[GreenEyedMonster envy]].[[note]]Not to be confused with Cannae, the site of another famous Roman defeat, at the hands of Hannibal in 216 BC.[[/note]] envy]]. Crassus lost heart when he learned that his son Publius had been killed in the fighting. Crassus himself was killed soon after when a fight broke out during a parley with the Parthians.


He secured the governorship of Syria, not only a very wealthy province, but also near to Parthia, one of the few kingdoms left in the known world not already conquered by the Romans. It seemed an attractive prospect for glory and booty, and Crassus may also have had in mind Pompey's easy victories in the region. Even among the Romans, who never needed much PretextForWar, Crassus' plans to invade Parthia attracted strong opposition. He nevertheless left for the east, and crossed into Parthia with seven legions. However, it had been almost twenty years since Crassus, now 62-years-old, had last seen action during the slave war, the invasion was poorly planned, and the Parthians [[MuggingTheMonster were a more formidable foe than expected]]. Crassus' army, mainly consisting of infantry, was easily outmanoeuvred by the Parthian horse archers in the desert and suffered a major defeat at Carrhae - a defeat so bad that the Parthian king thought it made the commander at Carrhae, Surena, look too good and had him executed out of [[GreenEyedMonster envy]].[[note]]Not to be confused with Cannae, the site of another famous Roman defeat, at the hands of Hannibal in 216 BC.[[/note]] Crassus lost heart when he learned that his son Publius had been killed in the fighting. Crassus himself was killed soon after when a fight broke out during a parley with the Parthians.

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He secured the governorship of Syria, not only a very wealthy province, but also near to Parthia, one of the few kingdoms left in the known world not already conquered by the Romans. It seemed an attractive prospect for glory and booty, and Crassus may also have had in mind Pompey's easy victories in the region. Even among the Romans, who never needed much PretextForWar, Crassus' plans to invade Parthia attracted strong opposition. He nevertheless left for the east, and crossed into Parthia with seven legions. However, it had been almost twenty years since Crassus, now 62-years-old, had last seen action during the slave war, the invasion was poorly planned, planned [[note]]Such as, Crassus refusing significant amounts of reinforcements (numbering similarly to his own forces) from Armenia to march toward Parthia as quickly as possible...through the desert.[[/note]], and the Parthians [[MuggingTheMonster were a more formidable foe than expected]]. Crassus' army, mainly consisting of infantry, was easily outmanoeuvred by the Parthian horse archers in the desert and suffered a major defeat at Carrhae - a defeat so bad that the Parthian king thought it made the commander at Carrhae, Surena, look too good and had him executed out of [[GreenEyedMonster envy]].[[note]]Not to be confused with Cannae, the site of another famous Roman defeat, at the hands of Hannibal in 216 BC.[[/note]] Crassus lost heart when he learned that his son Publius had been killed in the fighting. Crassus himself was killed soon after when a fight broke out during a parley with the Parthians.


As such, Marcus Crassus sought repeatedly to extend his circle and influence. He was known as a glad handler, courteous to all who greeted him, however low their rank. He was generous to friends and clients, paid off debts of prominent Romans and gave out interest free loans (though was known to be particularly zealous in recovering money loaned out). Considered a fine orator in his own right, he frequently advocated for defendants in court cases, even cases that were considered hopeless, another way of placing others in his debt.

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As such, Marcus Crassus sought repeatedly to extend his circle and influence. He built up a huge network of clients (men in his debt, either financially or for favours rendered). He was known as a glad handler, courteous to all who greeted him, however low their rank. He was generous to friends and clients, paid off debts of prominent Romans and gave out interest free loans (though was known to be particularly zealous in recovering money loaned out). Considered a fine orator in his own right, he frequently advocated for defendants in court cases, even cases that were considered hopeless, another way of placing others in his debt.
debt. In an age when prominent Romans regularly faced prosecution by their peers for their misdeeds, no one ever dared bring one against Crassus, such was his clout.


At the outset, Caesar was decidedly the junior partner in the alliance. Pompey was seen as Rome's greatest general and conqueror, Crassus was the richest man in Rome, Caesar was a lawyer whose teenage years included a brush with Sulla's proscription list. But soon the tables were turning. Caesar was becoming a surprising late bloomer. News soon reached across Italy of Caesar's military conquests in Gaul. Crassus and Pompey were elected to a second consulship in 54 BC but once again accomplished little. Crassus once again sought military glory.

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At the outset, Caesar was decidedly the junior partner in the alliance. Pompey was seen as Rome's greatest general and conqueror, Crassus was the richest man in Rome, Caesar was a lawyer whose teenage years included a brush with Sulla's proscription list. But soon the tables were turning. Caesar was becoming a surprising late bloomer. News news soon reached across Italy of Caesar's military conquests victories in Gaul.Gaul and his ultimate conquest of the country, earning him such wealth and prestige that he threatened to upstage his two allies. Crassus and Pompey were elected to a second consulship in 54 BC but once again accomplished little. Crassus once again sought military glory.


As such, Marcus Crassus sought repeatedly to extend his circle and influence. He was known as a glad handler, courteous to all who greeted him, however low their rank. He was generous to friends and clients, paid off debts of prominent Romans and gave out interest free loans (though was known to be particularly zealous in recovering money loaned out). Considered a fine orator in his own right, he frequently advocated for defendants in court cases, even cases that where considered hopeless, another way of placing others in his debt.

to:

As such, Marcus Crassus sought repeatedly to extend his circle and influence. He was known as a glad handler, courteous to all who greeted him, however low their rank. He was generous to friends and clients, paid off debts of prominent Romans and gave out interest free loans (though was known to be particularly zealous in recovering money loaned out). Considered a fine orator in his own right, he frequently advocated for defendants in court cases, even cases that where were considered hopeless, another way of placing others in his debt.


As such, Marcus Crassus sought repeatedly to extend his circle and influence. He was known as a glad handler, courteous to all who greeted him, however low their rank. He was generous to friends and clients. Considered a fine orator in his own right, he frequently advocated for defendants in court cases, another way of placing others in his debt. He paid off the debts of many prominent Romans, among them Julius Caesar, who accumulated enormous debts in order to win various offices. Despite being an optimate and Caesar being a populare, both were ambitious outsiders, and the two of them became friends.

to:

As such, Marcus Crassus sought repeatedly to extend his circle and influence. He was known as a glad handler, courteous to all who greeted him, however low their rank. He was generous to friends and clients. clients, paid off debts of prominent Romans and gave out interest free loans (though was known to be particularly zealous in recovering money loaned out). Considered a fine orator in his own right, he frequently advocated for defendants in court cases, even cases that where considered hopeless, another way of placing others in his debt. He paid off the debts of many prominent Romans, among them Julius Caesar, who accumulated enormous debts in order to win various offices. Despite being an optimate and Caesar being a populare, both were ambitious outsiders, and the two of them became friends.
debt.



Nevertheless, his defeat of the slaves helped him win the consulship in 70 BC, along with Pompey. According to Plutarch, the two men did not get along, disagreed on almost everything, and as a result their consulship accomplished almost nothing. Around this time, Crassus also became the patron of Julius Caesar, funding Caesar's election to the post of Pontifex Maximus in 65 BC. In 60/59 BC, Caesar brokered an alliance between the three of them, later known as the First Triumvirate: in return for Pompey and Crassus' support of his election to the consulship, he promised to push through laws wanted by both men, which had been frustrated for years by their enemies in the Senate. Pompey wished to grant land to his veterans, Crassus wished to relieve the debts of the publicani, with whom he had close links. Caesar was duly elected.

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Nevertheless, his defeat of the slaves helped him win the consulship in 70 BC, along with Pompey. According to Plutarch, the two men did not get along, disagreed on almost everything, and as a result their consulship accomplished almost nothing. Around this time, Crassus also became the patron of Julius Caesar, funding Caesar's election to the post of Pontifex Maximus in 65 BC. Despite Crassus being an optimate and Caesar being a populare, both were ambitious outsiders, and the two of them became friends. In 60/59 BC, Caesar brokered an alliance between the three of them, later known as the First Triumvirate: in return for Pompey and Crassus' support of his election to the consulship, he promised to push through enact laws wanted by both men, which had been frustrated for years by their enemies in the Senate. Pompey wished to grant land to his veterans, Crassus wished to relieve the debts of the publicani, with whom he had close links. With their support, Caesar was duly elected.
elected Consul and fulfilled his promises to both men by passing the laws they wanted.


Marcus Licinius Crassus (c. 115 BC - 53 BC) was an [[UsefulNotes/AncientRome Ancient Roman]] general and politician and an important figure in the [[UsefulNotes/TheRomanRepublic late Republic]]. He was a contemporary of UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar and UsefulNotes/PompeyTheGreat, with whom he formed the First Triumvirate, an alliance which saw the trio dominate the Republic in the 50s BC.

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Marcus Licinius Crassus (c. 115 BC - 53 BC) was an [[UsefulNotes/AncientRome [[AncientRome Ancient Roman]] general and politician and an important figure in the [[UsefulNotes/TheRomanRepublic late Republic]]. He was a contemporary of UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar and UsefulNotes/PompeyTheGreat, with whom he formed the First Triumvirate, an alliance which saw the trio dominate the Republic in the 50s BC.



His methods of acquiring wealth were unscrupulous, and earned him an enduring reputation for [[TheMiser greed and avarice]]. He took advantage of the proscriptions of Sulla's reign to buy up the property of outlawed patricians and enemies which showed up on the lists, and was noted to add names onto the list based on how much Crassus thought their property would be worth on Rome's real-estate market. Such greed took even Sulla by surprise. During fires in the city (a frequent occurence in the ancient world), he would buy burning houses and ones adjacent to them at knockdown prices, then a team of slaves he had on standby would put out the fire and rebuild the property (if the owner refused to sell, it would be left to burn). Crassus would often then lease the property back to the person he had just bought it from.

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His methods of acquiring wealth were unscrupulous, and earned him an enduring reputation for [[TheMiser [[TheScrooge greed and avarice]]. He took advantage of the proscriptions of Sulla's reign to buy up the property of outlawed patricians and enemies which showed up on the lists, and was noted to add names onto the list based on how much Crassus thought their property would be worth on Rome's real-estate market. Such greed took even Sulla by surprise. During fires in the city (a frequent occurence in the ancient world), he would buy burning houses and ones adjacent to them at knockdown prices, then a team of slaves he had on standby would put out the fire and rebuild the property (if the owner refused to sell, it would be left to burn). Crassus would often then lease the property back to the person he had just bought it from.



He secured the governorship of Syria, not only a very wealthy province, but also near to Parthia, one of the few kingdoms left in the known world not already conquered by the Romans. It seemed an attractive prospect for glory and booty, and Crassus may also have had in mind Pompey's easy victories in the region. Even among the Romans, who never needed much PretextForWar, Crassus' plans to invade Parthia attracted strong opposition. He nevertheless left for the east, and crossed into Parthia with seven legions. However, it had been almost twenty years since Crassus, now 62-years-old, had last seen action during the slave war, the invasion was poorly planned, and the Parthians [[MuggingTheMonster were a more formidable foe than expected]]. Crassus' army, mainly consisting of infantry, was easily outmanoeuvred by the Parthian horse archers in the desert and suffered a major defeat at Carrhae - a defeat so bad that the Parthian king thought it made the commander at Carrhae, Surena, look too good and had him executed out of envy.[[note]]Not to be confused with Cannae, the site of another famous Roman defeat, at the hands of Hannibal in 216 BC.[[/note]] Crassus lost heart when he learned that his son Publius had been killed in the fighting. Crassus himself was killed soon after when a fight broke out during a parley with the Parthians.

to:

He secured the governorship of Syria, not only a very wealthy province, but also near to Parthia, one of the few kingdoms left in the known world not already conquered by the Romans. It seemed an attractive prospect for glory and booty, and Crassus may also have had in mind Pompey's easy victories in the region. Even among the Romans, who never needed much PretextForWar, Crassus' plans to invade Parthia attracted strong opposition. He nevertheless left for the east, and crossed into Parthia with seven legions. However, it had been almost twenty years since Crassus, now 62-years-old, had last seen action during the slave war, the invasion was poorly planned, and the Parthians [[MuggingTheMonster were a more formidable foe than expected]]. Crassus' army, mainly consisting of infantry, was easily outmanoeuvred by the Parthian horse archers in the desert and suffered a major defeat at Carrhae - a defeat so bad that the Parthian king thought it made the commander at Carrhae, Surena, look too good and had him executed out of envy.[[GreenEyedMonster envy]].[[note]]Not to be confused with Cannae, the site of another famous Roman defeat, at the hands of Hannibal in 216 BC.[[/note]] Crassus lost heart when he learned that his son Publius had been killed in the fighting. Crassus himself was killed soon after when a fight broke out during a parley with the Parthians.


* In Robert Harris' ''Literature/{{Imperium}}'', Crassus is a major character, portrayed as an AffablyEvil ManipulativeBastard.

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* In Robert Harris' ''Literature/{{Imperium}}'', Crassus is a major character, portrayed as an AffablyEvil ManipulativeBastard.manipulator.


* ''Film/{{Spartacus}}'': Crassus is played by Creator/LaurenceOlivier and portrayed as a DepravedBisexual aristocrat.

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* ''Film/{{Spartacus}}'': Crassus is played by Creator/LaurenceOlivier and portrayed as a DepravedBisexual aristocrat.
aristocrat who uses the slave revolt as an excuse to launch a coup d'etat in Rome.


He secured the governorship of Syria, not only a very wealthy province, but also near to Parthia, one of the few kingdoms left in the known world not already conquered by the Romans. It seemed an attractive prospect for glory and booty, and Crassus may also have had in mind Pompey's easy victories in the region. Even among the Romans, who never needed much PretextForWar, Crassus' plans to invade Parthia attracted strong opposition. He nevertheless left for the east, and crossed into Parthia with seven legions. However, it had been almost twenty years since Crassus, now 62-years-old, had last seen action during the slave war, the invasion was poorly planned, and the Parthians [[MuggingTheMonster were a more formidable foe than expected]]. Crassus' army, mainly consisting of infantry, was easily outmanoeuvred by the Parthian horse archers in the desert and suffered a major defeat at Carrhae.[[note]]Not to be confused with Cannae, the site of another famous Roman defeat, at the hands of Hannibal in 216 BC.[[/note]] Crassus lost heart when he learned that his son Publius had been killed in the fighting. Crassus himself was killed soon after when a fight broke out during a parley with the Parthians.

to:

He secured the governorship of Syria, not only a very wealthy province, but also near to Parthia, one of the few kingdoms left in the known world not already conquered by the Romans. It seemed an attractive prospect for glory and booty, and Crassus may also have had in mind Pompey's easy victories in the region. Even among the Romans, who never needed much PretextForWar, Crassus' plans to invade Parthia attracted strong opposition. He nevertheless left for the east, and crossed into Parthia with seven legions. However, it had been almost twenty years since Crassus, now 62-years-old, had last seen action during the slave war, the invasion was poorly planned, and the Parthians [[MuggingTheMonster were a more formidable foe than expected]]. Crassus' army, mainly consisting of infantry, was easily outmanoeuvred by the Parthian horse archers in the desert and suffered a major defeat at Carrhae.Carrhae - a defeat so bad that the Parthian king thought it made the commander at Carrhae, Surena, look too good and had him executed out of envy.[[note]]Not to be confused with Cannae, the site of another famous Roman defeat, at the hands of Hannibal in 216 BC.[[/note]] Crassus lost heart when he learned that his son Publius had been killed in the fighting. Crassus himself was killed soon after when a fight broke out during a parley with the Parthians.


* Crassus is one of the individuals profiled in Plutarch's ''Literature/ParallelLives''. His biography is paired with the fifth century BC Greek general and politican Nicias.

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* Crassus is one of the individuals profiled in Plutarch's ''Literature/ParallelLives''. His biography is paired with the fifth century BC Greek general and politican politician Nicias.


* He appears in Colleen [=McCullough=]'s ''Literature/MastersOfRome'' as an ally of Caesar.

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* He appears in Colleen [=McCullough=]'s ''Literature/MastersOfRome'' as an ally of Caesar. [=McCullough=]'s version of Crassus is a rare sympathetic view of the man - he ''is'' still tight fisted and greedy but he's also a loyal friend and not otherwise depicted as a bad guy. Even his harsh military discipline and treatment of the defeated members of Spartacus's army is treated as stern but understandable given the circumstances.


* Crassus is one of the individuals profiled in Plutarch's ''Parallel Lives''. His biography is paired with the fifth century BC Greek general and politican Nicias.

to:

* Crassus is one of the individuals profiled in Plutarch's ''Parallel Lives''.''Literature/ParallelLives''. His biography is paired with the fifth century BC Greek general and politican Nicias.

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