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* Zip ‘N Snort (Jones): Wile E. Coyote, Road Runner.

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* Zip ‘N Snort WesternAnimation/ZipNSnort (Jones): Wile E. Coyote, Road Runner.



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[[index]]



* Corn On The Cop (Irv Spector): Daffy, Porky, Granny. Last classic-era short to feature Porky Pig and Granny.
* Rushing Roulette ([=McKimson=]): Wile E. Coyote, Road Runner.

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* Corn On The Cop WesternAnimation/CornOnTheCop (Irv Spector): Daffy, Porky, Granny. Last classic-era short to feature Porky Pig and Granny.
* Rushing Roulette WesternAnimation/RushingRoulette ([=McKimson=]): Wile E. Coyote, Road Runner.



* Harried And Hurried (Larriva): Wile E. Coyote, Road Runner. Produced at Format Films.

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* Harried And Hurried WesternAnimation/HarriedAndHurried (Larriva): Wile E. Coyote, Road Runner. Produced at Format Films.




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[[/index]]




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[[index]]



* Clippety Clobbered (Larriva): Wile E. Coyote, Road Runner. Produced at Format Films.

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* Clippety Clobbered WesternAnimation/ClippetyClobbered (Larriva): Wile E. Coyote, Road Runner. Produced at Format Films.Films; last of the Larriva 11.




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[[/index]]


* WesternAnimation/DaffysDiner ([=McKimson=]): Daffy, Speedy. Final cartoon scored by Walter Greene, final short produced at [=DePatie=]-Freleng

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* WesternAnimation/DaffysDiner [[WesternAnimation/DaffysDiner Daffy's Diner]] ([=McKimson=]): Daffy, Speedy. Final cartoon scored by Walter Greene, final short produced at [=DePatie=]-Freleng


* Daffy’s Diner ([=McKimson=]): Daffy, Speedy. Final cartoon scored by Walter Greene, final short produced at [=DePatie=]-Freleng

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* Daffy’s Diner WesternAnimation/DaffysDiner ([=McKimson=]): Daffy, Speedy. Final cartoon scored by Walter Greene, final short produced at [=DePatie=]-Freleng


* Pancho’s Hideaway (Freleng, Pratt): Speedy.: The first short produced at Depatie-Freleng Enterprises. Co-stars a Mexican variant of Yosemite Sam.

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* Pancho’s Pancho's Hideaway (Freleng, Pratt): Speedy.: The first short produced at Depatie-Freleng Enterprises. Co-stars a Mexican variant of Yosemite Sam.



* It’s Nice To Have A Mouse Around The House (Freleng, Pratt): Speedy, Sylvester, Granny, Daffy.

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* It’s It's Nice To Have A Mouse Around The House (Freleng, Pratt): Speedy, Sylvester, Granny, Daffy.



* Well Worn Daffy ([=McKimson=]): Daffy, Speedy.

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* Well Worn Daffy WesternAnimation/WellWornDaffy ([=McKimson=]): Daffy, Speedy.


One of the things that would mark this era was the near-absence of series headliner Bugs Bunny, who would take his last bow of the classic era in 1964's ''False Hare''. With Bugs now largely gone, Daffy would now take his frustrations on Speedy Gonzales; the lion's share of their output in this era would have them butting heads. Wile E. Coyote continued to chase the Road Runner, most infamously in 11 cartoons directed by Rudy Larriva (plus [[WesternAnimation/TheWildChase one by Friz Freleng]] and two by Robert [=McKimson=]). Under the supervision of Alex Lovy, newcomers to the ''Looney Tunes'' stable would be introduced from 1967 onward, including Bunny and Claude (a Bonnie and Clyde parody with rabbits robbing banks of their carrots), Cool Cat (a beatnik tiger) and Merlin The Magic Mouse (a magician caricature of W.C. Fields.) These characters were largely disliked, and today are regarded as being emblematic of the DorkAge of Warner Bros. Animation. Didn't stop Cool Cat from appearing in ''WesternAnimation/TheSylvesterAndTweetyMysteries'', though.

to:

One of the things that would mark this era was the near-absence of series headliner Bugs Bunny, who would take his last bow of the classic era in 1964's ''False Hare''. With Bugs now largely gone, Daffy would now take his frustrations on Speedy Gonzales; the lion's share of their output in this era would have them butting heads. heads, though Sylvester briefly appeared during this time as well, as did Porky Pig in one short. Meanwhile, Wile E. Coyote continued to chase the Road Runner, most infamously in 11 eleven cartoons directed by Rudy Larriva (plus [[WesternAnimation/TheWildChase one by Friz Freleng]] and two by Robert [=McKimson=]). Under the supervision of Alex Lovy, newcomers to the ''Looney Tunes'' stable would be introduced from 1967 onward, including Bunny and Claude (a Bonnie and Clyde parody with rabbits robbing banks of their carrots), Cool Cat (a beatnik tiger) and Merlin The Magic Mouse (a magician caricature of W.C. Fields.) These characters were largely disliked, and today are regarded as being emblematic of the DorkAge of Warner Bros. Animation. Didn't That didn't stop Cool Cat from appearing in ''WesternAnimation/TheSylvesterAndTweetyMysteries'', though.


Though the classic stable of characters would continue to reappear in coming decades, it's largely agreed that they have yet to once again match the dizzying quality they had in the 40's and fifties (mostly due to the original directors and crew members dying and the fact that [[TimeMarchesOn time]] and [[SocietyMarchesOn society]] has marched on and what one generation found funny will fall flat or be deemed as backwards and insensitive to the next).

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Though the classic stable of characters would continue to reappear in coming decades, it's largely agreed that they have yet to once again match the dizzying quality they had in the 40's 1940s and fifties '50s (mostly due to the original directors and crew members dying and the fact that [[TimeMarchesOn time]] and [[SocietyMarchesOn society]] has marched on and what one generation found funny will fall flat or be deemed as backwards and insensitive to the next).



* The Adventures of the Road Runner (Jones, Noble): Wile E. Coyote, Road Runner. A Made for TV pilot.

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* The Adventures of the Road Runner (Jones, Noble): Wile E. Coyote, Road Runner. A Made for TV made-for-TV pilot.



* The Iceman Ducketh (Monroe): Bugs, Daffy.

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* The Iceman Ducketh WesternAnimation/TheIcemanDucketh (Monroe): Bugs, Daffy.


* Freudy Cat ([=McKimson=]): Sylvester, Sylvester Jr., Hippety Hopper. A "cheater" cartoon which reuses animation from "Who's Kitten Who?", "Too Hop to Handle", "The Slap-Hoppy Mouse", and "Cats a-Weigh". Hippety Hopper's last classic-era appearance.

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* Freudy Cat ([=McKimson=]): Sylvester, Sylvester Jr., Hippety Hopper. A "cheater" cartoon which reuses animation from "Who's Kitten Who?", "Too Hop to Handle", "The Slap-Hoppy Mouse", and "Cats a-Weigh". Hippety Hopper's Hopper and Sylvester Jr.'s last classic-era appearance.


One of the things that would mark this era was the near-absence of series headliner Bugs Bunny, who would take his last bow of the classic era in 1964's ''False Hare''. With Bugs now largely gone, Daffy would now take his frustrations on Speedy Gonzales; the lion's share of their output in this era would have them butting heads. Wile E. Coyote continued to chase the Road Runner, most infamously in 11 cartoons directed by Rudy Larriva (plus [[WesternAnimation/TheWildChase one by Friz Freleng]] and two by Robert [=McKimson=]). Under the supervision of Alex Lovy, newcomers to the Looney Tunes stable would be introduced from 1967 onward, including Bunny and Claude (a Bonnie and Clyde parody with rabbits robbing banks of their carrots), Cool Cat (a beatnik tiger) and Merlin The Magic Mouse (a magician caricature of W.C. Fields.) These characters were largely disliked, and today are regarded as being emblematic of the DorkAge of Warner Bros. Animation.

to:

One of the things that would mark this era was the near-absence of series headliner Bugs Bunny, who would take his last bow of the classic era in 1964's ''False Hare''. With Bugs now largely gone, Daffy would now take his frustrations on Speedy Gonzales; the lion's share of their output in this era would have them butting heads. Wile E. Coyote continued to chase the Road Runner, most infamously in 11 cartoons directed by Rudy Larriva (plus [[WesternAnimation/TheWildChase one by Friz Freleng]] and two by Robert [=McKimson=]). Under the supervision of Alex Lovy, newcomers to the Looney Tunes ''Looney Tunes'' stable would be introduced from 1967 onward, including Bunny and Claude (a Bonnie and Clyde parody with rabbits robbing banks of their carrots), Cool Cat (a beatnik tiger) and Merlin The Magic Mouse (a magician caricature of W.C. Fields.) These characters were largely disliked, and today are regarded as being emblematic of the DorkAge of Warner Bros. Animation.
Animation. Didn't stop Cool Cat from appearing in ''WesternAnimation/TheSylvesterAndTweetyMysteries'', though.



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[[caption-width-right:250:Here’s the first sign that things are about to go very, very wrong...]]


* Transylvania 6-5000 (MM) (Jones, Noble): Bugs.

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* Transylvania 6-5000 WesternAnimation/Transylvania65000 (MM) (Jones, Noble): Bugs.


The 1960s Warner Bros. cartoons didn't really air much on American free-to-air TV (some between 1960 and 1964 have aired, but, compared to the popular shorts between 1948 and 1959, it was rare). However, Nickelodeon's daytime version of ''Looney Tunes on Nick''[[note]]their Nick-at-Nite version was more known for airing 1930s black and white cartoons starring the early, non-descript Warner Bros. characters like Bosko and Buddy[[/note]] was home to a lot of 1960s Warner Bros. shorts, both from the twilight of the GoldenAge and the post-1964 DorkAge shorts (barring 1969's "Injun Trouble", even though Nickelodeon did have legal permission to air it since it was in their broadcast library. They just didn't, due to Standards and Practices). In fact, for anyone who grew up watching Nickelodeon in the 1990s (and didn't just watch the Nicktoons or the live-action shows), they will remember that ''Looney Tunes on Nickelodeon'' aired a lot of the much-loathed Daffy Duck/Speedy Gonzales shorts (and, on occasion, the failed new character shorts, like "Bunny and Claude: We Rob Carrot Patches", the Cool Cat cartoons that weren't "Injun Trouble", and "Chimp and Zee").

to:

The 1960s Warner Bros. cartoons didn't really air much on American free-to-air TV (some shorts between 1960 and 1964 have aired, aired[[note]]though ABC's ''The Bugs Bunny and Tweety Show'' once aired the 1965 short "Corn on the Cop" and some of the Rudy Larriva- and Robert [=McKimson=]-directed Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote cartoons[[/note]], but, compared to the popular shorts between 1948 and 1959, it was rare). However, Nickelodeon's daytime version of ''Looney Tunes on Nick''[[note]]their Nick-at-Nite version was more known for airing 1930s black and white cartoons starring the early, non-descript Warner Bros. characters like Bosko and Buddy[[/note]] was home to a lot of 1960s Warner Bros. shorts, both from the twilight of the GoldenAge and the post-1964 DorkAge shorts (barring 1969's "Injun Trouble", even though Nickelodeon did have legal permission to air it since it was in their broadcast library. They just didn't, due to Standards and Practices). In fact, for anyone who grew up watching Nickelodeon in the 1990s (and didn't just watch the Nicktoons or the live-action shows), they will remember that ''Looney Tunes on Nickelodeon'' aired a lot of the much-loathed Daffy Duck/Speedy Gonzales shorts (and, on occasion, the failed new character shorts, like "Bunny and Claude: We Rob Carrot Patches", the Cool Cat cartoons that weren't "Injun Trouble", and "Chimp and Zee").
Zee"). The Daffy/Speedy cartoons also aired on CBS in the 1970s and 1980s, though, compared to Nickelodeon's version, the CBS versions edited a lot of comic violence involving electrocutions and explosions.

Added DiffLines:



As the page image here illustrates, the 1960s marked a time of change for the Looney Tunes brand. As UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfAnimation was just starting, it was not a time long time fans would very much enjoy. The practice of including cartoons before theatrical films was starting to disappear, as cartoons began to make the mass exodus to television, and the AnimationAgeGhetto started to take effect in force. This would lead to many animation studios having their budgets slashed, as there was far less money to be made in theatrical cartoon shorts. To be sure, there was a lot of quality work in this era: the Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner cartoons really hit their stride, along with some of the last great Bugs Bunny cartoons of the "classic" Looney Tunes era. But ever lower budgets meant a lot of shortcuts had to be taken, and the lush hand-painted backgrounds of previous decades would give way to flatter, more abstract designs, and character animation would become much less fluid and more formulaic, with the influence of the Avery/Clampett eras largely disappearing. On IMDB, the latest Looney Tunes cartoon to hit an 8.0 rating was Bugs Bunny's 1963 outing ''Transylvania 6-5000'', while the 1965 Wile E./Road Runner cartoon ''Road Runner-a-Go-Go'' is the only cartoon released under [=DePatie=]-Freleng or Seven Arts to exceed a 7.0 there, possibly because it's leftovers from an unsold television pilot that eventually became ''WesternAnimation/ToBeepOrNotToBeep''.

to:

As the page image here illustrates, the 1960s marked a time of change for the Looney Tunes brand.

As UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfAnimation was just starting, it was not a time long time fans would very much enjoy. The practice of including cartoons before theatrical films was starting to disappear, as cartoons began to make the mass exodus to television, and the AnimationAgeGhetto started to take effect in force. This would lead to many animation studios having their budgets slashed, as there was far less money to be made in theatrical cartoon shorts. To be sure, there was a lot of quality work in this era: the Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner cartoons really hit their stride, along with some of the last great Bugs Bunny cartoons of the "classic" Looney Tunes era. But ever lower budgets meant a lot of shortcuts had to be taken, and the lush hand-painted backgrounds of previous decades would give way to flatter, more abstract designs, and character animation would become much less fluid and more formulaic, with the influence of the Avery/Clampett eras largely disappearing. On IMDB, the latest Looney Tunes cartoon to hit an 8.0 rating was Bugs Bunny's 1963 outing ''Transylvania 6-5000'', while the 1965 Wile E./Road Runner cartoon ''Road Runner-a-Go-Go'' is the only cartoon released under [=DePatie=]-Freleng or Seven Arts to exceed a 7.0 there, possibly because it's leftovers from an unsold television pilot that eventually became ''WesternAnimation/ToBeepOrNotToBeep''.




Though the classic stable of characters would continue to reappear in coming decades, it's largely agreed that they have yet to once again match the dizzying quality they had in the 40's and fifties.

to:

\nThe 1960s Warner Bros. cartoons didn't really air much on American free-to-air TV (some between 1960 and 1964 have aired, but, compared to the popular shorts between 1948 and 1959, it was rare). However, Nickelodeon's daytime version of ''Looney Tunes on Nick''[[note]]their Nick-at-Nite version was more known for airing 1930s black and white cartoons starring the early, non-descript Warner Bros. characters like Bosko and Buddy[[/note]] was home to a lot of 1960s Warner Bros. shorts, both from the twilight of the GoldenAge and the post-1964 DorkAge shorts (barring 1969's "Injun Trouble", even though Nickelodeon did have legal permission to air it since it was in their broadcast library. They just didn't, due to Standards and Practices). In fact, for anyone who grew up watching Nickelodeon in the 1990s (and didn't just watch the Nicktoons or the live-action shows), they will remember that ''Looney Tunes on Nickelodeon'' aired a lot of the much-loathed Daffy Duck/Speedy Gonzales shorts (and, on occasion, the failed new character shorts, like "Bunny and Claude: We Rob Carrot Patches", the Cool Cat cartoons that weren't "Injun Trouble", and "Chimp and Zee").

Though the classic stable of characters would continue to reappear in coming decades, it's largely agreed that they have yet to once again match the dizzying quality they had in the 40's and fifties.
fifties (mostly due to the original directors and crew members dying and the fact that [[TimeMarchesOn time]] and [[SocietyMarchesOn society]] has marched on and what one generation found funny will fall flat or be deemed as backwards and insensitive to the next).

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