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One of the things that would mark this era was the near-absence of series headliner Bugs Bunny, who would take his last bow of the classic era in 1964's ''False Hare''. With Bugs now largely gone, Daffy would now take his frustrations on Speedy Gonzales; the lion's share of their output in this era would have them butting heads, though Sylvester briefly appeared during this time as well, as did Porky Pig in one short. Meanwhile, Wile E. Coyote continued to chase the Road Runner, most infamously in eleven cartoons directed by Rudy Larriva (plus [[WesternAnimation/TheWildChase one by Friz Freleng]] and two by Robert [=McKimson=]). Under the supervision of Alex Lovy, newcomers to the ''Looney Tunes'' stable would be introduced from 1967 onward, including Bunny and Claude (a ''Film/BonnieAndClyde'' parody with rabbits robbing banks of their carrots), Cool Cat (a beatnik tiger) and Merlin The Magic Mouse (a magician caricature of W.C. Fields.) These characters were largely disliked, and today are regarded as being emblematic of the DorkAge of Warner Bros. Animation. That didn't stop Cool Cat from appearing in ''WesternAnimation/TheSylvesterAndTweetyMysteries'', though.

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One of the things that would mark this era was the near-absence of series headliner Bugs Bunny, who would take his last bow of the classic era in 1964's ''False Hare''. With Bugs now largely gone, Daffy would now take his frustrations on Speedy Gonzales; the lion's share of their output in this era would have them butting heads, though Sylvester briefly appeared during this time as well, as did Porky Pig in one short. Meanwhile, Wile E. Coyote continued to chase the Road Runner, most infamously in eleven cartoons directed by Rudy Larriva (plus [[WesternAnimation/TheWildChase one by Friz Freleng]] and two by Robert [=McKimson=]). Under the supervision of Alex Lovy, newcomers to the ''Looney Tunes'' stable would be introduced from 1967 onward, including Bunny and Claude (a ''Film/BonnieAndClyde'' parody with rabbits robbing banks of their carrots), Cool Cat (a beatnik tiger) and Merlin The Magic Mouse (a magician caricature of W.C. Fields.) These characters were largely disliked, and today are regarded as being emblematic of the DorkAge AudienceAlienatingEra of Warner Bros. Animation. That didn't stop Cool Cat from appearing in ''WesternAnimation/TheSylvesterAndTweetyMysteries'', though.



The 1960s Warner Bros. cartoons didn't really air much on American free-to-air TV (some shorts between 1960 and 1964 have aired[[note]]though ABC's ''The Bugs Bunny and Tweety Show'' once aired the 1965 short "Corn on the Cop" and some of the Rudy Larriva- and Robert [=McKimson=]-directed Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote cartoons[[/note]], but, compared to the popular shorts between 1948 and 1959, it was rare). However, Nickelodeon's daytime version of ''Looney Tunes on Nick''[[note]]their Nick-at-Nite version was more known for airing 1930s black and white cartoons starring the early, non-descript Warner Bros. characters like Bosko and Buddy[[/note]] was home to a lot of 1960s Warner Bros. shorts, both from the twilight of the GoldenAge and the post-1964 DorkAge shorts (barring 1969's "Injun Trouble", even though Nickelodeon did have legal permission to air it since it was in their broadcast library. They just didn't, due to Standards and Practices). In fact, for anyone who grew up watching Nickelodeon in the 1990s (and didn't just watch the Nicktoons or the live-action shows), they will remember that ''Looney Tunes on Nickelodeon'' aired a lot of the much-loathed Daffy Duck/Speedy Gonzales shorts (and, on occasion, the failed new character shorts, like "Bunny and Claude: We Rob Carrot Patches", the Cool Cat cartoons that weren't "Injun Trouble", and "Chimp and Zee"). The Daffy/Speedy cartoons also aired on CBS in the 1970s and 1980s, though, compared to Nickelodeon's version, the CBS versions edited a lot of comic violence involving electrocutions and explosions.

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The 1960s Warner Bros. cartoons didn't really air much on American free-to-air TV (some shorts between 1960 and 1964 have aired[[note]]though ABC's ''The Bugs Bunny and Tweety Show'' once aired the 1965 short "Corn on the Cop" and some of the Rudy Larriva- and Robert [=McKimson=]-directed Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote cartoons[[/note]], but, compared to the popular shorts between 1948 and 1959, it was rare). However, Nickelodeon's daytime version of ''Looney Tunes on Nick''[[note]]their Nick-at-Nite version was more known for airing 1930s black and white cartoons starring the early, non-descript Warner Bros. characters like Bosko and Buddy[[/note]] was home to a lot of 1960s Warner Bros. shorts, both from the twilight of the GoldenAge and the post-1964 DorkAge shorts (barring 1969's "Injun Trouble", even though Nickelodeon did have legal permission to air it since it was in their broadcast library. They just didn't, due to Standards and Practices). In fact, for anyone who grew up watching Nickelodeon in the 1990s (and didn't just watch the Nicktoons or the live-action shows), they will remember that ''Looney Tunes on Nickelodeon'' aired a lot of the much-loathed Daffy Duck/Speedy Gonzales shorts (and, on occasion, the failed new character shorts, like "Bunny and Claude: We Rob Carrot Patches", the Cool Cat cartoons that weren't "Injun Trouble", and "Chimp and Zee"). The Daffy/Speedy cartoons also aired on CBS in the 1970s and 1980s, though, compared to Nickelodeon's version, the CBS versions edited a lot of comic violence involving electrocutions and explosions.


* Crow’s Feat (Freleng, Pratt)

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* Crow’s Crow's Feat (Freleng, Pratt)


* Prince Violent (Freleng, Pratt): Bugs, Sam. Retitled "Prince Varmint" ever since the 1970s due to CBS' censors finding the title inappropriate (and other channels, including Cartoon Network and Boomerang, aired it that way, as they couldn't find the original version). As of 2020, the short has been restored with its original titles on HBO Max and the Bugs Bunny 80th Anniversary Blu-Ray collection.
* Daffy’s Inn Trouble ([=McKimson=]): Daffy, Porky.
* What’s My Lion? ([=McKimson=]): Elmer. Elmer's last speaking role in the classic Looney Tunes series.

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* Prince Violent (Freleng, Pratt): Bugs, Sam. Retitled "Prince Varmint" ever since the 1970s due to CBS' censors finding the title inappropriate (and other channels, including Cartoon Network and Boomerang, aired it that way, as they couldn't find the original version). As of 2020, the short has been restored with its original titles on HBO Max and the Bugs Bunny 80th Anniversary Blu-Ray collection.
collection. Airings of this short on Creator/MeTV starting in 2021 would also retain the original titles.
* Daffy’s Inn Trouble WesternAnimation/DaffysInnTrouble ([=McKimson=]): Daffy, Porky.
* What’s What's My Lion? ([=McKimson=]): Elmer. Elmer's last speaking role in the classic Looney Tunes series.


* Quackodile Tears (Creator/ArthurDavis): Daffy. Arthur Davis's final cartoon (and his first one since 1949). Is the only time in which Daffy [[OffModel isn't drawn with his white collar]]

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* Quackodile Tears (Creator/ArthurDavis): Daffy. Arthur Davis's final cartoon (and his first one since 1949). Is the only time in which Daffy [[OffModel isn't drawn with his white collar]]collar]].


* The Million Hare ([=McKimson=]): Bugs, Daffy.

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* The Million Hare WesternAnimation/TheMillionHare ([=McKimson=]): Bugs, Daffy.


The Warner Brothers animation studio was closed in 1964, but Looney Tunes animation continued as Warners subcontracted out to Creator/FrizFreleng's new studio, Creator/DepatieFrelengEnterprises.[[note]]At the same time [=DePatie=]-Freleng was picking up Looney Tunes, they were creating the last great character of the golden age, WesternAnimation/ThePinkPanther[[/note]] In 1967, the then-renamed Warner Bros.-Seven Arts temporarily re-opened an in-house animation studio, which operated on vastly smaller budgets and mostly made cartoons with new characters that failed to catch on. The last cartoon short with any of the "classic" characters would be 1968's ''See You Later Gladiator'', another Daffy/Speedy match up. Warner Brothers got out of the animated short business for good in 1969, the original theatrical cartoons unceremoniously ending with the Cool Cat film ''Injun Trouble''.

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The Warner Brothers animation studio was closed in 1964, but Looney Tunes animation continued as Warners subcontracted out to Creator/FrizFreleng's new studio, Creator/DepatieFrelengEnterprises.[[note]]At the same time [=DePatie=]-Freleng was picking up Looney Tunes, they were creating the last great character of the golden age, WesternAnimation/ThePinkPanther[[/note]] In 1967, the then-renamed Warner Bros.-Seven Arts temporarily re-opened an in-house animation studio, which operated on vastly smaller budgets and mostly made cartoons with new characters that failed to catch on. The last cartoon short with any of the "classic" established characters would be 1968's ''See You Later Gladiator'', another Daffy/Speedy match up. Warner Brothers got out of the animated short business for good in 1969, the original theatrical cartoons unceremoniously ending with the Cool Cat film ''Injun Trouble''.


As the page image here illustrates, the 1960s marked a time of change for the Looney Tunes brand, and as UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfAnimation was just starting, it was not one that long time fans would very much enjoy. The practice of including cartoons before theatrical films was starting to disappear, as cartoons began to make the mass exodus to television, and the AnimationAgeGhetto started to take effect in force. This would lead to many animation studios having their budgets slashed, as there was far less money to be made in theatrical cartoon shorts. To be sure, there was a lot of quality work in this era: the Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner cartoons really hit their stride, along with some of the last great Bugs Bunny cartoons of the "classic" Looney Tunes era. But ever lower budgets meant a lot of shortcuts had to be taken, and the lush hand-painted backgrounds of previous decades would give way to flatter, more abstract designs, and character animation would become much less fluid and more formulaic, with the influence of the Avery/Clampett eras largely disappearing. On IMDB, the latest Looney Tunes cartoon to hit an 8.0 rating was Bugs Bunny's 1963 outing ''Transylvania 6-5000'', while the 1965 Wile E./Road Runner cartoon ''Road Runner-a-Go-Go'' is the only cartoon released under [=DePatie=]-Freleng or Seven Arts to exceed a 7.0 there, possibly because it's leftovers from an unsold television pilot that eventually became ''WesternAnimation/ToBeepOrNotToBeep''.

to:

As the page image here illustrates, the 1960s marked a time of change for the Looney Tunes brand, and as UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfAnimation was just starting, it was not one that long time fans would very much enjoy.

The practice of including cartoons before theatrical films was starting to disappear, as cartoons began to make the mass exodus to television, and the AnimationAgeGhetto started to take effect in force. This would lead to many animation studios having their budgets slashed, as there was far less money to be made in theatrical cartoon shorts. To be sure, there was a lot of quality work in this era: the Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner cartoons really hit their stride, along with some of the last great Bugs Bunny cartoons of the "classic" Looney Tunes era. But ever lower budgets meant a lot of shortcuts had to be taken, and the lush hand-painted backgrounds of previous decades would give way to flatter, more abstract designs, and character animation would become much less fluid and more formulaic, with the influence of the Avery/Clampett eras largely disappearing. On IMDB, the latest Looney Tunes cartoon to hit an 8.0 rating was Bugs Bunny's 1963 outing ''Transylvania 6-5000'', while the 1965 Wile E./Road Runner cartoon ''Road Runner-a-Go-Go'' is the only cartoon released under [=DePatie=]-Freleng or Seven Arts to exceed a 7.0 there, possibly because it's leftovers from an unsold television pilot that eventually became ''WesternAnimation/ToBeepOrNotToBeep''.


As the page image here illustrates, the 1960s marked a time of change for the Looney Tunes brand. As UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfAnimation was just starting, it was not one that long time fans would very much enjoy. The practice of including cartoons before theatrical films was starting to disappear, as cartoons began to make the mass exodus to television, and the AnimationAgeGhetto started to take effect in force. This would lead to many animation studios having their budgets slashed, as there was far less money to be made in theatrical cartoon shorts. To be sure, there was a lot of quality work in this era: the Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner cartoons really hit their stride, along with some of the last great Bugs Bunny cartoons of the "classic" Looney Tunes era. But ever lower budgets meant a lot of shortcuts had to be taken, and the lush hand-painted backgrounds of previous decades would give way to flatter, more abstract designs, and character animation would become much less fluid and more formulaic, with the influence of the Avery/Clampett eras largely disappearing. On IMDB, the latest Looney Tunes cartoon to hit an 8.0 rating was Bugs Bunny's 1963 outing ''Transylvania 6-5000'', while the 1965 Wile E./Road Runner cartoon ''Road Runner-a-Go-Go'' is the only cartoon released under [=DePatie=]-Freleng or Seven Arts to exceed a 7.0 there, possibly because it's leftovers from an unsold television pilot that eventually became ''WesternAnimation/ToBeepOrNotToBeep''.

to:

As the page image here illustrates, the 1960s marked a time of change for the Looney Tunes brand. As brand, and as UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfAnimation was just starting, it was not one that long time fans would very much enjoy. The practice of including cartoons before theatrical films was starting to disappear, as cartoons began to make the mass exodus to television, and the AnimationAgeGhetto started to take effect in force. This would lead to many animation studios having their budgets slashed, as there was far less money to be made in theatrical cartoon shorts. To be sure, there was a lot of quality work in this era: the Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner cartoons really hit their stride, along with some of the last great Bugs Bunny cartoons of the "classic" Looney Tunes era. But ever lower budgets meant a lot of shortcuts had to be taken, and the lush hand-painted backgrounds of previous decades would give way to flatter, more abstract designs, and character animation would become much less fluid and more formulaic, with the influence of the Avery/Clampett eras largely disappearing. On IMDB, the latest Looney Tunes cartoon to hit an 8.0 rating was Bugs Bunny's 1963 outing ''Transylvania 6-5000'', while the 1965 Wile E./Road Runner cartoon ''Road Runner-a-Go-Go'' is the only cartoon released under [=DePatie=]-Freleng or Seven Arts to exceed a 7.0 there, possibly because it's leftovers from an unsold television pilot that eventually became ''WesternAnimation/ToBeepOrNotToBeep''.


As the page image here illustrates, the 1960s marked a time of change for the Looney Tunes brand.

As UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfAnimation was just starting, it was not a time long time fans would very much enjoy. The practice of including cartoons before theatrical films was starting to disappear, as cartoons began to make the mass exodus to television, and the AnimationAgeGhetto started to take effect in force. This would lead to many animation studios having their budgets slashed, as there was far less money to be made in theatrical cartoon shorts. To be sure, there was a lot of quality work in this era: the Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner cartoons really hit their stride, along with some of the last great Bugs Bunny cartoons of the "classic" Looney Tunes era. But ever lower budgets meant a lot of shortcuts had to be taken, and the lush hand-painted backgrounds of previous decades would give way to flatter, more abstract designs, and character animation would become much less fluid and more formulaic, with the influence of the Avery/Clampett eras largely disappearing. On IMDB, the latest Looney Tunes cartoon to hit an 8.0 rating was Bugs Bunny's 1963 outing ''Transylvania 6-5000'', while the 1965 Wile E./Road Runner cartoon ''Road Runner-a-Go-Go'' is the only cartoon released under [=DePatie=]-Freleng or Seven Arts to exceed a 7.0 there, possibly because it's leftovers from an unsold television pilot that eventually became ''WesternAnimation/ToBeepOrNotToBeep''.

to:

As the page image here illustrates, the 1960s marked a time of change for the Looney Tunes brand. \n\n As UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfAnimation was just starting, it was not a time one that long time fans would very much enjoy. The practice of including cartoons before theatrical films was starting to disappear, as cartoons began to make the mass exodus to television, and the AnimationAgeGhetto started to take effect in force. This would lead to many animation studios having their budgets slashed, as there was far less money to be made in theatrical cartoon shorts. To be sure, there was a lot of quality work in this era: the Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner cartoons really hit their stride, along with some of the last great Bugs Bunny cartoons of the "classic" Looney Tunes era. But ever lower budgets meant a lot of shortcuts had to be taken, and the lush hand-painted backgrounds of previous decades would give way to flatter, more abstract designs, and character animation would become much less fluid and more formulaic, with the influence of the Avery/Clampett eras largely disappearing. On IMDB, the latest Looney Tunes cartoon to hit an 8.0 rating was Bugs Bunny's 1963 outing ''Transylvania 6-5000'', while the 1965 Wile E./Road Runner cartoon ''Road Runner-a-Go-Go'' is the only cartoon released under [=DePatie=]-Freleng or Seven Arts to exceed a 7.0 there, possibly because it's leftovers from an unsold television pilot that eventually became ''WesternAnimation/ToBeepOrNotToBeep''.


* Person To Bunny (Freleng): Bugs, Daffy, Elmer. Notably the final short to feature Arthur Q. Bryan, who passed away in November 1959, as Elmer

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* Person To Bunny WesternAnimation/PersonToBunny (Freleng): Bugs, Daffy, Elmer. Notably the final short to feature Arthur Q. Bryan, who passed away in November 1959, as Elmer


* The Unmentionables (Freleng): Bugs, Rocky, Mugsy.

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* The Unmentionables WesternAnimation/TheUnmentionables (Freleng): Bugs, Rocky, Mugsy.



* WesternAnimation/Transylvania65000 (MM) (Jones, Noble): Bugs.

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* WesternAnimation/Transylvania65000 (MM) (Jones, Noble): Bugs.


* The Mouse on 57th Street (Jones): A one-shot cartoon about a mouse who gets drunk on rum cake and steals a diamond (which he mistakes for ice for his hangover). Notable as the final Warners short on which legendary storyman Mike Maltese recekives credit, presumably due to his departure for Hanna-Barbera during early production of this short in 1958.

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* The Mouse on 57th Street (Jones): A one-shot cartoon about a mouse who gets drunk on rum cake and steals a diamond (which he mistakes for ice for his hangover). Notable as the final Warners short on which legendary storyman Mike Maltese recekives receives credit, presumably due to his departure for Hanna-Barbera during early production of this short in 1958.

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