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* BigNameFan: Creator/TiffanyGrant has [[http://www.truantpixel.com/eva-r/tiff/stats.htm listed this film]] as one of her top ten favorite anime titles on her official website.


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* DuelingDubs: There are two Latin American Spanish dubs, both made simultaneously. One produced by Disney made in UsefulNotes/MexicoCity-based Prime Dubb/SDI Media de México (broadcasted in HBO) and another one produced by Primer Plano made in Buenos Aires-based Videorecord for their theatrical distribution in Argentina.[[note]]Both dubs were made for cinemas, which are ''way'' more expensive than the average dub for TV, DVD/BD and streaming. This also makes the only case of a production recieving two neutral Latin American Spanish dub for cinemas.[[/note]] When Disney bought Primer Plano's Argentine theatrical rights of ''Spirited Away'', they decided to release it with the Argentine dub instead of their own dub. To this date, the Argentine dub it's the most distributed in the region, being the only one ever released on home video and broadcasted on air TV and Disney Latino has come to distribute it in streaming and TV broadcasts in Creator/DisneyChannel and {{Creator/Jetix}}; the Mexican dub, [[Main/KeepCirculatingTheTapes however]]...

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* DuelingDubs: There are two three Latin American Spanish dubs, both made simultaneously. One produced by Disney made in UsefulNotes/MexicoCity-based Prime Dubb/SDI Media de México (broadcasted in HBO) and HBO), another one produced by Primer Plano made in Buenos Aires-based Videorecord for their theatrical distribution in Argentina.[[note]]Both dubs were made for cinemas, which are ''way'' more expensive than the average dub for TV, DVD/BD and streaming. This also makes the only case of a production recieving two neutral Latin American Spanish dub for cinemas.[[/note]] and another one done in Mexico by BTI for Netflix. When Disney bought Primer Plano's Argentine theatrical rights of ''Spirited Away'', they decided to release it with the Argentine dub instead of their own dub. To this date, the Argentine dub it's the most distributed in the region, being the only one ever released on home video and broadcasted on air TV and Disney Latino has come to distribute it in streaming and TV broadcasts in Creator/DisneyChannel and {{Creator/Jetix}}; the Mexican dub, [[Main/KeepCirculatingTheTapes however]]...


* * UsefulNotes/ListOfFilmsYouShouldSeeByTheAgeOf14: #7

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* * UsefulNotes/ListOfFilmsYouShouldSeeByTheAgeOf14: #7


* ActorAllusion: "I'll miss you, Chihiro. Your best friend, Rumi." (In the Japanese version, Chihiro was voiced by Rumi Hiiragi.)

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* CrossDressingVoices: In the Taiwanese and Hong Kong dubs, Haku is voiced by Wang Shizhen and Can Ngonjing respectively.


* PosthumousCredit: Yasuyoshi Tokuma is given a credit as chief executive producer, having been involved in the early stages of production.

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* PosthumousCredit: Yasuyoshi Tokuma is given a credit as chief executive producer, having been involved in the early stages of production.production before his September 2000 death.


* DuelingDubs: There are two Latin American Spanish dubs, both made simultaneously. One produced by Disney made in Prime Dubb/SDI Media de México, UsefulNotes/MexicoCity (broadcasted in HBO) and another one produced by Primer Plano made in Videorecord, Buenos Aires for their theatrical distribution in Argentina.[[note]]Both dubs were made for cinemas, which are ''way'' more expensive than the average dub for TV, DVD/BD and streaming. This also makes the only case of a production recieving two neutral Latin American Spanish dub for cinemas.[[/note]] When Disney bought Primer Plano's Argentine theatrical rights of ''Spirited Away'', they decided to release it with the Argentine dub instead of their own dub. To this date, the Argentine dub it's the most distributed in the region, being the only one ever released on home video and broadcasted on air TV and Disney Latino has come to distribute it in streaming and TV broadcasts in Creator/DisneyChannel and {{Creator/Jetix}}; the Mexican dub, [[Main/KeepCirculatingTheTapes however]]...
* ExecutiveMeddling: With a rare ''positive'' spin and happy ending. After the lackluster box office showing for ''Anime/PrincessMononoke'', Disney executives were hesitant to move forward with more of the Studio Ghibli films they'd bought the rights for. ''Anime/CastleInTheSky'' had been dubbed and shown up on the film festival circuit, but no proper release date was announced, and it seemed like the other Ghibli films would be lost in DevelopmentHell. The happy ending? John Lasseter, then the head of Creator/{{Pixar}}, stuck his neck out to push for ''Spirited Away's'' production and release in America. Lasseter's championing of the film, and its eventual Oscar win, was the impetus for the eventual release of the rest of the Ghibli catalog on DVD, as well as the distribution of future Ghibli films.
** On some editions of the DVD, John Lasseter appears before the movie begins to gush about how wonderful ''Spirited Away'' is. There's even footage of him with his arm around Hayao Miyazaki!

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* DuelingDubs: There are two Latin American Spanish dubs, both made simultaneously. One produced by Disney made in UsefulNotes/MexicoCity-based Prime Dubb/SDI Media de México, UsefulNotes/MexicoCity México (broadcasted in HBO) and another one produced by Primer Plano made in Videorecord, Buenos Aires Aires-based Videorecord for their theatrical distribution in Argentina.[[note]]Both dubs were made for cinemas, which are ''way'' more expensive than the average dub for TV, DVD/BD and streaming. This also makes the only case of a production recieving two neutral Latin American Spanish dub for cinemas.[[/note]] When Disney bought Primer Plano's Argentine theatrical rights of ''Spirited Away'', they decided to release it with the Argentine dub instead of their own dub. To this date, the Argentine dub it's the most distributed in the region, being the only one ever released on home video and broadcasted on air TV and Disney Latino has come to distribute it in streaming and TV broadcasts in Creator/DisneyChannel and {{Creator/Jetix}}; the Mexican dub, [[Main/KeepCirculatingTheTapes however]]...
* ExecutiveMeddling: With a rare ''positive'' spin and happy ending. After the lackluster box office showing for ''Anime/PrincessMononoke'', Disney executives were hesitant to move forward with more of the Studio Ghibli films they'd bought the rights for. ''Anime/CastleInTheSky'' had been dubbed and shown up on the film festival circuit, but no proper release date was announced, and it seemed like the other Ghibli films would be lost in DevelopmentHell. The happy ending? John Lasseter, Creator/JohnLasseter, then the head of Creator/{{Pixar}}, stuck his neck out to push for ''Spirited Away's'' production and release in America. Lasseter's championing of the film, and its eventual Oscar win, was the impetus for the eventual release of the rest of the Ghibli catalog on DVD, as well as the distribution of future Ghibli films.
** On some editions of the DVD, John Lasseter appears before the movie begins to gush about how wonderful ''Spirited Away'' is. There's even footage of him with his arm around Hayao Miyazaki!



* PromotedFanboy: Takashi Naito, the voice of Chihiro's father, is a fan of Miyazaki's works.

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* PromotedFanboy: Takashi Naito, the voice of Chihiro's father, is a longtime fan of Miyazaki's works.



** When Chihiro accidentally steps on the slug, the Boiler Man does a "cut the line" routine with her. In Miyazaki's time, this was a "cleansing" ritual that kids performed among each other when one of them accidentally stepped in poo. Much to Miyazaki's chagrin, he had to explain this to Chihiro's young voice-actress!

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** When Chihiro accidentally steps on the slug, the Boiler Man does a "cut the line" routine with her. In Miyazaki's time, this was a "cleansing" ritual that kids performed among each other when one of them accidentally stepped in poo. feces. Much to Miyazaki's chagrin, he had to explain this to Chihiro's young voice-actress!Rumi Hiiragi!


* ThrowItIn: While the rest of the English dub had to be a perfect syllable-for-syllable match-up, John Ratzenberger was allowed to improvise new lyrics to the assistant manager's little song. The line "Now ''that's'' an esophagus!" (said after No-Face spits him out) was also his idea.

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* ThrowItIn: While the rest of the English dub had to be a perfect syllable-for-syllable match-up, John Ratzenberger was allowed to improvise new lyrics to the assistant manager's little song. The line "Now ''that's'' an esophagus!" (said after No-Face spits him out) was also his idea.idea.
* WhatCouldHaveBeen: Zeniba's design was originally planned to be much more distinct from Yubaba's, being taller and thinner, but there wasn't enough room to develop an entirely new character who didn't appear until late in the film. Then it was suggested that they could be distinguished by the number of rings they wore, but it was difficult to keep track of that, so Zeniba ended up looking exactly the same as Yubaba.

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* * UsefulNotes/ListOfFilmsYouShouldSeeByTheAgeOf14: #7


* ThrowItIn: While the rest of the English dub had to be a perfect syllable-for-syllable match-up, John Ratzenberger was allowed to improvise new lyrics to the assistant manager's little song.

to:

* ThrowItIn: While the rest of the English dub had to be a perfect syllable-for-syllable match-up, John Ratzenberger was allowed to improvise new lyrics to the assistant manager's little song. The line "Now ''that's'' an esophagus!" (said after No-Face spits him out) was also his idea.

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* PosthumousCredit: Yasuyoshi Tokuma is given a credit as chief executive producer, having been involved in the early stages of production.


* PromotedFanboy: Takeshi Naito, the voice of Chihiro's father, is a fan of Miyazaki's works.

to:

* PromotedFanboy: Takeshi Takashi Naito, the voice of Chihiro's father, is a fan of Miyazaki's works.

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* PromotedFanboy: Takeshi Naito, the voice of Chihiro's father, is a fan of Miyazaki's works.

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