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%% ZeroContextExample entries are not allowed in wiki articles. All such entries have been commented out. Do not uncomment them without explaining why they belong on this page. Just the work title does not speak for itself.

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%% ZeroContextExample Administrivia/ZeroContextExample entries are not allowed in wiki articles. All such entries have been commented out. Do not uncomment them without explaining why they belong on this page. Just the work title does not speak for itself.


* Most of Music/GeorgeGershwin's opera ''PorgyAndBess'', but particular offenders are "My Man's Gone Now," "Bess, You Is My Woman," and the finale, "Oh, Lawd, I'm On My Way." A really great Porgy will reduce anyone to a blubbering mess with his unfailing determination to find Bess in New York.

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* Most of Music/GeorgeGershwin's opera ''PorgyAndBess'', ''Theatre/PorgyAndBess'', but particular offenders are "My Man's Gone Now," "Bess, You Is My Woman," and the finale, "Oh, Lawd, I'm On My Way." A really great Porgy will reduce anyone to a blubbering mess with his unfailing determination to find Bess in New York.


* The Intermezzo Sinfonico from the opera ''Cavalleria Rusticana'' by Pietro Mascagni. This was used very effectively in the ''Anime/RurouniKenshin'' anime and the opening credits to ''Film/RagingBull''.

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* The Intermezzo Sinfonico from the opera ''Cavalleria Rusticana'' by Pietro Mascagni. This was used very effectively in the ''Anime/RurouniKenshin'' anime and anime, the opening credits to ''Film/RagingBull''.''Film/RagingBull'' and the ending of ''Film/TheGodfatherPartIII''.


* The 2nd Movement from FelixMendelssohn's Violin Concerto in E minor has one of the most beautiful, heartbreaking melodies written for violin. So much so that Andrew Lloyd Webber used it for "[[Theatre/JesusChristSuperstar I Don't Know How To Love Him]]."

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* The 2nd Movement from FelixMendelssohn's Music/FelixMendelssohn's Violin Concerto in E minor has one of the most beautiful, heartbreaking melodies written for violin. So much so that Andrew Lloyd Webber used it for "[[Theatre/JesusChristSuperstar I Don't Know How To Love Him]]."


** Satirist Music/TomLehrer made a joke about this on one of his albums, describing Mahler as "the writer of ''Das Lied von der Erde'' and other light classics".

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** Satirist Music/TomLehrer made a joke about this on one of his albums, album ''Music/ThatWasTheYearThatWas'', describing Mahler as "the writer of ''Das Lied von der Erde'' and other light classics".


** More than that, Schubert's ''Winterreise'' is one of the most depressing pieces of music ever written, especially if you know the words. It may rank only behind Górecki's Third Symphony in terms of sheer, devastating effect.
*** In the final song of ''Winterreise'', "''Der Leiermann''", the singer describes an old organ-grinder, wandering through the world alone playing music while holding an empty begging-bowl and being shunned by the people around him. Still he keeps on playing. The singer wonders if he is meant to go with the organ-grinder and if the organ-grinder will ever play one of his songs. The kicker? This is the very last song Schubert ever composed, and he finished revising the proofs on his deathbed. This is what was going through Schubert's mind about his own music when he died.

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** More than that, Schubert's ''Winterreise'' is one of the most depressing pieces of music ever written, especially if you know the words. It may rank only behind Górecki's Third Symphony in terms of sheer, devastating effect.
***
effect. In the final song of ''Winterreise'', "''Der Leiermann''", "Der Leiermann", the singer describes an old organ-grinder, wandering through the world alone playing music while holding an empty begging-bowl and being shunned by the people around him. Still he keeps on playing. The singer wonders if he is meant to go with the organ-grinder and if the organ-grinder will ever play one of his songs. The kicker? This is the very last song Schubert ever composed, and he finished revising the proofs on his deathbed. This is what was going through Schubert's mind about his own music when he died.

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*** In the final song of ''Winterreise'', "''Der Leiermann''", the singer describes an old organ-grinder, wandering through the world alone playing music while holding an empty begging-bowl and being shunned by the people around him. Still he keeps on playing. The singer wonders if he is meant to go with the organ-grinder and if the organ-grinder will ever play one of his songs. The kicker? This is the very last song Schubert ever composed, and he finished revising the proofs on his deathbed. This is what was going through Schubert's mind about his own music when he died.


* The 2nd Movement from FelixMendelssohn's Violin Concerto in E minor has one of the most beautiful, heartbreaking melodies written for violin. So much so that Andrew Lloyd Webber used it for "[[JesusChristSuperstar I Don't Know How To Love Him]]."

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* The 2nd Movement from FelixMendelssohn's Violin Concerto in E minor has one of the most beautiful, heartbreaking melodies written for violin. So much so that Andrew Lloyd Webber used it for "[[JesusChristSuperstar "[[Theatre/JesusChristSuperstar I Don't Know How To Love Him]]."


** Two words: ''Madame Butterfly''. Two more: ''LaBoheme''. Dammit, Cio-cio-san and Mimi, WHY?!

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** Two words: ''Madame Butterfly''. Two more: ''LaBoheme''.''Theatre/LaBoheme''. Dammit, Cio-cio-san and Mimi, WHY?!


* Maurice Ravel's ''Pavane pour une infante defunte'' (Pavane for a Dead Princess). Ironically, this isn't meant to be a tear-jerker at all; its status as one is based on a misunderstanding of the title. It was meant not as an elegy for a deceased princess, but rather to evoke a dance (Pavane) that would have been danced by a princess from an earlier age, while she was alive (the pavane being a popular dance among nobility during the Renaissance). Ravel himself admitted that he only used the words "infante defunte" because he liked the alliteration. The pavane was a slow processional dance that enjoyed great popularity in the courts of Europe during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, which is why Ravel himself intended the piece to be played extremely slowly more slowly than almost any modern interpretation, according to his biographer Benjamin Ivry.

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* Maurice Ravel's ''Pavane pour une infante defunte'' (Pavane for a Dead Princess). Ironically, this isn't meant to be a tear-jerker at all; its status as one is based on a misunderstanding of the title. It was meant not as an elegy for a deceased princess, but rather to evoke a dance (Pavane) that would have been danced by a princess from an earlier age, while she was alive (the pavane being a popular dance among nobility during the Renaissance). Ravel himself admitted that he only used the words "infante defunte" because he liked the alliteration. The pavane was a slow processional dance that enjoyed great popularity in the courts of Europe during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, which is why Ravel himself He also intended the piece to be played extremely slowly more slowly than almost any modern interpretation, according to his biographer Benjamin Ivry.


* Maurice Ravel's ''Pavane pour une infante defunte'' (Pavane for a Dead Princess). Ironically, this isn't meant to be a tear-jerker at all; its status as one is based on a misunderstanding of the title. It was meant not as an elegy for a deceased princess, but rather to evoke a dance that would have been danced by a princess from an earlier age, while she was alive (the pavane being a popular dance among nobility during the Renaissance). Ravel himself admitted that he only used the words "infante defunte" because he liked the alliteration, and hated the slow tempo that people subsequently tended to take when playing the piece.

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* Maurice Ravel's ''Pavane pour une infante defunte'' (Pavane for a Dead Princess). Ironically, this isn't meant to be a tear-jerker at all; its status as one is based on a misunderstanding of the title. It was meant not as an elegy for a deceased princess, but rather to evoke a dance (Pavane) that would have been danced by a princess from an earlier age, while she was alive (the pavane being a popular dance among nobility during the Renaissance). Ravel himself admitted that he only used the words "infante defunte" because he liked the alliteration, and hated the alliteration. The pavane was a slow tempo processional dance that people subsequently tended to take when playing enjoyed great popularity in the piece.courts of Europe during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, which is why Ravel himself intended the piece to be played extremely slowly more slowly than almost any modern interpretation, according to his biographer Benjamin Ivry.


** The [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1FP7NosLxkw Adagio Cantabile]] of the ''Pathetique'' Sonata. Even more so if you're a ''RurouniKenshin'' fan, since this is the piano piece that plays during [[spoiler: Yumi's death]] and [[spoiler:Kenshin's first proper visit to Tomoe's grave]] in the Kyoto arc.

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** The [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1FP7NosLxkw Adagio Cantabile]] of the ''Pathetique'' Sonata. Even more so if you're a ''RurouniKenshin'' ''Anime/RurouniKenshin'' fan, since this is the piano piece that plays during [[spoiler: Yumi's death]] and [[spoiler:Kenshin's first proper visit to Tomoe's grave]] in the Kyoto arc.


** Remember the cliché slogan "You don't have to be Jewish to enjoy (whatever)"? Well, "You don't have to be Christian" to be moved to tears by [[FranzSchubert Schubert]]'s "Ave". (Although technically Schubert originally wrote the music as a setting of an epic poem, only later re-setting it to fit the "Ave Maria".)

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** Remember the cliché slogan "You don't have to be Jewish to enjoy (whatever)"? Well, "You don't have to be Christian" to be moved to tears by [[FranzSchubert [[Music/FranzSchubert Schubert]]'s "Ave". (Although technically Schubert originally wrote the music as a setting of an epic poem, only later re-setting it to fit the "Ave Maria".)


* [[strike:Albinoni's]] Remo Giazotto's [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XMbvcp480Y4 Adagio in G minor]].

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* [[strike:Albinoni's]] Remo Giazotto's "Albinoni's" [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XMbvcp480Y4 Adagio in G minor]].minor]] (actually by 20th-century composer Remo Giazotto, but no less tearjerking for it).


* "Albinoni's" [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XMbvcp480Y4 Adagio in G minor]] (actually by 20th-century composer Remo Giazotto, but no less tearjerking for it).
%%* Allegri's ''Miserere''.

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* "Albinoni's" [[strike:Albinoni's]] Remo Giazotto's [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XMbvcp480Y4 Adagio in G minor]] (actually by 20th-century composer Remo Giazotto, but no less tearjerking for it).
minor]].
%%* Allegri's ''Miserere''.

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