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**''Gravity Falls'' is also a spiritual antithesis to ''WesternAnimation/TheGrimAdventuresOfBillyAndMandy''. Both shows take place in American town where paranormal events usually occur. Both have boy and girl as protagonist. While in ''Gravity Falls'' two kids are siblings and are sent to paranormal town during the summer vacation, in ''Grim Adventures'', kids are residents of same neighbourhood and are not siblings. Also kids of respective gender have opposite personalities- boys: Dipper is smart, curious and a little shy, while Billy is dumb and hyperactive; girls: Mabel is hyperactive and talkative, but not as dumb as Billy, while Mandy is cruel and emotionless and more anti-social than Dipper. Main adult characters in cartoons have different personalities Pines twins' granduncle, Stan[[spoiler:Ley]] Pines is an average human, who is a souvenir shopkeeper, who tries to attract tourist and uses his grand-niblings to advertise his shop, but for his selfish purposes, and Billy's and Mandy's friend, Grim is a Death God, who lost a competition to them and thus forced to serve them, is very sensitive and kind person, whom kids are using for their purposes. Both Stan and Grim work as these jobs due to psychological trauma in their youth. Residents of Gravity Falls are unaware of supernatural events, while Endsville residents are monsters, who live alongside humans.


* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsRebels'' is both the Spiritual Successor and Spiritual Antithesis to ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars''. ''The Clone Wars'' was set during the time of the Prequel Trilogy and used the main characters from that trilogy and focused mostly on standalone episodes while ''Rebels'' went to the Original Trilogy, used original characters as protagonists, and made more use of serial, arc-based storytelling.

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* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsRebels'' is both the Spiritual Successor sequel and Spiritual Antithesis to ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars''. ''The Clone Wars'' was set during the time of the Prequel Trilogy and used the main characters from that trilogy and focused mostly on standalone episodes while ''Rebels'' went to the Original Trilogy, used original characters as protagonists, and made more use of serial, arc-based storytelling.


* The second ''WesternAnimation/DannyPhantom'' 1 hour special, "WesternAnimation/TheUltimateEnemy", is this to "WesternAnimation/ChannelChasers", the second 1 hour special to Creator/ButchHartman's first series, ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents''. Both involve {{time travel}}, dealing with growing up and meeting and facing against future selves, but take different paths. In Channel Chasers, Timmy rejects the idea of growing up and escapes into the world of television to avoid aging; in The Ultimate Enemy, Danny is stressed about a test that might determine whether or not his future is a successful one. While they both meet and oppose their future selves, each does it differently. Timmy opposes his future self before knowing who he is (believing him to be a threatening individual) and upon learning he is itneracting with his older self, he still has trouble with it. However, they bond as they stop Vicky from trying to reach the history channel (and thus cause a retroactive reality warp that would cause her to become ruler of the world.) Danny however never does this with his older self, opposing him all the way due to his older self being a violent sociopath responsible for destroying most of humanity [[note]]though Dark Dan isn't fully Danny, being a fusion of Danny's ghost form absorbing Vlad's ghost form, but becomes overwhelm by the evil and the two fuse.[[/note]]. By the end, Timmy does look forward to growing up again after being inspired by his older counterpart, while Danny rejects his BadFuture in favor of a better one where he still remains a hero.

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* The second ''WesternAnimation/DannyPhantom'' 1 hour special, "WesternAnimation/TheUltimateEnemy", is this to "WesternAnimation/ChannelChasers", the second 1 hour special to Creator/ButchHartman's first series, ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents''. Both involve {{time travel}}, dealing with growing up and meeting and facing against future selves, but take different paths. In Channel Chasers, Timmy rejects the idea of growing up and escapes into the world of television to avoid aging; in The Ultimate Enemy, Danny is stressed about a test that might determine whether or not his future is a successful one. While they both meet and oppose their future selves, each does it differently. Timmy opposes his future self before knowing who he is (believing him to be a threatening individual) and upon learning he is itneracting interacting with his older self, he still has trouble with it. However, they bond as they stop Vicky from trying to reach the history channel (and thus cause a retroactive reality warp that would cause her to become ruler of the world.) Danny however never does this with his older self, opposing him all the way due to his older self being a violent sociopath responsible for destroying most of humanity [[note]]though Dark Dan isn't fully Danny, being a fusion of Danny's ghost form absorbing Vlad's ghost form, but becomes overwhelm overwhelmed by the evil and the two fuse.[[/note]]. By the end, Timmy does look forward to growing up again after being inspired by his older counterpart, while Danny rejects his BadFuture in favor of a better one where he still remains a hero.


* ''WesternAnimation/SausageParty'', like ''WesternAnimation/VeggieTales'', is an animated story that uses AnthropomorphicFood to deliver a message about religion. However, while ''[=VeggieTales=]'' is a Christian animated series that retells Biblical stories and parables and is intended to teach children proper morals, ''Sausage Party'' is an atheistic film in which the protagonists discover that religion is a lie to cover up the fact that [[HumansAreCthulhu their "gods"]] are actually {{Eldritch Abomination}}s who plan to eat them, and is very much intended strictly for adults.


* Aside from often parodying plot elements from the books, ''WesternAnimation/TheOwlHouse'' is also built like an opposite of ''Literature/HarryPotter'' books.
** Both stories feature the protagonist entering a world where everyone is using magic and learning to master it themselves. But Harry is a FamedInStory ChosenOne who is welcomed with open arms into a MagicSchool due to being born with magic powers and inherited immense wealth from his dead parents. Luz on the other hand has no innate magical ability and needs to learn an entirely new way to do magic, her desire to be a chosen one serves only to get her into trouble, she is initially accepted only by utter outcasts of society and needs to earn the acceptance of others, including her place at magic school.
** Harry was raised by an abusive human family he has to come back on summer breaks and despite the books never excusing Dursley's behavior and Harry clearly tolerating them at best, they are still treated by the narrative as his true family with outright magical bond of blood [[spoiler: which protects him from BigBad when he stays at their house]]. Camila and Luz clearly love each other and while Camila sends Luz off to a camp that's supposed to beat from her any creativity and free spirit, it is presented as coming from misguided fear [[AdultFear how the world will hurt her daughter if she won't learn to fit in]]. Luz is also supposed to return home after summer break ends as well [[spoiler: at least until she has to destroy her way home to stop it from falling into the hands of the BigBad]]. Despite that, the show still presents a narrative in strong support of a found family that loves you being better than a biological family that hurts you.
** The Wizarding World society is presented as overall good and any injustices, power abuses or manipulations of public opinions come from individuals who are either incompetent, acting in self-serving interest or outright evil, with main antagonists being a group of [[FantasticRacism wizard]] [[ANaziByAnyOtherName supremacists]] seen as dangerous societal outcasts and terrorists [[spoiler: even after they take over in the final book - upon their defeat the system returns back to normal]]. Boiling Isles slowly reveals itself as a CrapsaccharineWorld with [[SocialDarwinist "dog-eat-dog" mindset]] dominated by an extremely strict Coven System that benefits TheEmperor at the top of it and his inner circle [[spoiler: and have forcefully surpassed and destroyed the old traditions and then brainwash new generations with propaganda about how it was a good thing]].
** While they're both an AcademyOfAdventure, Hogwarts is presented as a place run by people who care for their students, and headmaster Dumbledore is seen as a ReasonableAuthorityFigure and BigGood of the series, while Hexside seems to exist first and foremost to reinforce the Coven System, with teachers who clearly don't care for the safety of their students beyond warding off attacks from outside forces and principal Bumps varies from being a BunnyEarsLawyer to AmbiguouslyEvil, with rare moments of reason.
** Among the first other kids Harry meets are Hermione, a ChildProdigy who is the best student of her age but faces opposition [[FantasticRacism due to having human parents]] and Draco, a smug child of a rich and powerful wizard family, who becomes Harry's rival. The first other kids Luz meets are Willow - a young witch who is bullied and called a half-witch due to struggling with magic only to be revealed to have great magical skill but being misclassified by the system - and Amity, an AcademicAlphaBitch from a rich and powerful family, who initially starts as Luz' rival only to be with time revealed that [[HiddenDepths the way she acts comes from cracking under immense pressure put on her by her parents]] and slowly developing a friendship with Luz. [[spoiler: Moreover, despite the fanbase being very vocal about wanting a possibility of Harry/Draco romance, the books never consider this an option, while Amity eventually falls in love with Luz.]]
** Eda and her sister Lilith both contrast Severus Snape in different ways. Just like Snape, Eda's main tool of trade is potion-making but clearly possess skills beyond that. But while Snape is enjoying an overall acceptance among the society, despite being a horribly abusive teacher to his students and Harry in particular, any attempts to mend fences between them ultimately failing, and has been EasilyForgiven for [[spoiler: being part of the abovementioned terrorists in the past]], Eda is a wanted criminal simply because she refuses to adhere to Coven System and is good, if unorthodox, mentor to Luz as well as her ParentalSubstitute. Lilith meanwhile shares being a middle-aged {{Goth}} working within a powerful institution in the setting. But where Snape works for the BigGood, Lilith works for the BigBad. Moreover: [[spoiler: they both got this position by betrayal, but where Snape betrayed the BigBad for killing a woman he loves yet never accepts his role in leading to that death, Lilith betrayed her own sister, cursing her to ensure she can get into Emperor's Coven and in the end learned she needs to take responsibility for her actions. They both deflect again, with Snape pulling a fake betrayal to work as TheMole and only finding redemption after being killed, while Lilith turning away from the Emperor upon realizing he won't cure Eda and having to live and earn forgiveness for what she has done. The books try to excuse Snape's actions with a sad backstory, while Lilith's backstory doesn't make excuses for her actions but shows they were motivated by shortsightedness and stupidity, rather than pure malice.]]
** The Hogwarts Houses vs the Coven System. Hogwarts Houses are chosen for students, while Hexside kids can pick a Coven of their choice. While Houses aren't perfect as they breed rivalries, they aren't as oppressive as covens; Coven membership is mandatory and failure to join a coven is a high order criminal offense. When a witch joins a coven all of their magic is sealed off except the magic of their chosen coven. On the other hand, kids from different covens get along well, unlike when Gryffindor and Slytherin kids mix. You can also only be in one house at Hogwarts; Luz eventually bucks the system and joins multiple covens. Houses earn points, while covens do not.


* To a degree, Cartoon Network's two most sucessful (mini)series ''WesternAnimation/OverTheGardenWall'' and ''WesternAnimation/InfinityTrain'' can be considered this. Both series bear similar aspects, such as a protagonist trapped in a EldritchLocation setting, and coming with terms with a change in your life [[spoiler:(Wirt learning to appreciate his younger half-brother in the former and Tulip's being able to deal with her parents divorce in the latter.)]] but differ greatly in setting. While the former has elements derived primarily from 19th-20th century [[FantasyAmericana Americana fiction]], the latter is ambiented in a mid-20th SciFi inspired environment. While OTGW only has the [[TheLostWoods Unknown]] as the principal setting, Infinity Train allows the main character to explore the vastly different worlds contained in the [[CoolTrain train's cars.]]
* ''WesternAnimation/WallE'' has been described as a LighterAndSofter SpiritualAdaptation of Creator/MikeJudge's film ''Film/{{Idiocracy}}'', both being comedies depicting futures in which consumerism and low-brow culture run amok have left humanity breathtakingly stupid, unable to manage things for themselves -- complete with Earth being covered in the TrashOfTheTitans. A critical difference, however, is in the roads they take to get there, and where their societies ultimately ended up. ''Idiocracy''[='=]s dystopia came about as the result of the stupid (coded as contemporary {{Lower Class Lout}}s) outbreeding the smart (producing what some have criticized as a [[SlobsVersusSnobs classist, or even eugenicist, subtext]]), causing society to decay to the point where, by the year 2505, the world is facing famine due to the decision to [[TooDumbToLive irrigate crops with]] [[SaltTheEarth electrolyte-filled energy drinks]] purely on the basis of marketing hype. ''WALL•E'', on the other hand, has maintained an advanced, high-tech society -- and in fact, this is precisely what destroyed them. By delegating all responsibility to the robots, humanity became a race of lazy, [[BigFatFuture overweight]], [[ManChild infantilized]] slobs who can't do anything for themselves and need their robotic assistants to cater to their every whim. In short, while the dystopia in ''Idiocracy'' is portrayed as the LogicalExtreme of lower-class "trailer park" culture run amok, that of ''WALL•E'' is portrayed as the logical extreme of middle-class consumerism run amok.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'':
** In its early years, it was this to virtually all of the {{Dom Com}}s that had proliferated on American television since TheFifties, such as ''Series/LeaveItToBeaver'', ''Series/TheBradyBunch'', ''Series/TheWaltons'', and ''Series/TheCosbyShow'', offering a far more satirical take on the idealized nuclear family with ([[SeinfeldIsUnfunny for the time]]) a lot of blue humor and outlandish behavior from the main characters. Many MoralGuardians, including US President UsefulNotes/GeorgeHWBush, saw its subversion and parody of sitcom tropes as [[TheNewRockAndRoll undermining family values]], to which the writers of ''The Simpsons'' responded by carrying on a FriendlyRivalry with Bush and frequently making jokes about him throughout TheNineties, culminating in an episode where Bush briefly moves to Springfield post-presidency.
** According to Super Eyepatch Wolf in [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KqFNbCcyFkk "The Fall Of The Simpsons: How It Happened",]] ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' in modern times (colloquially known as "[[SeasonalRot Zombie Simpsons]]") has more or less become the antithesis of ''itself'' back in its prime. The characters in Prime Simpsons were satires of character archetypes in the wholesome family sitcoms that came before it, but also had developed personalities, and jokes in the series had to be written around those personalities, while in Zombie Simpsons they're generic characters with simple personalities that can be form fit into whatever unrelated jokes the writers want to write (i.e. Ned Flanders initially being a left-handed, all-loving [[TheAce Ace]] who's also a devoted Christian, [[{{Flanderization}} and eventually just becoming a vehicle for jabs at Christians and Conservatives.]]) Its relationship with celebrities changed as well; in Prime Simpsons actual real-life celebrities rarely appeared, instead opting for {{Lawyer Friendly Cameo}}s voiced by one of the regular voice actors, or having celebrity cameos voice new one-off characters who look nothing like them (Music/MichaelJackson appearing as a mental patient who thinks he's Michael Jackson being one of the most famous examples,) while in Zombie Simpsons celebrities appearing as themselves became the norm (with one of the Simpsons even blatantly pointing them out as a RunningGag.) One section says it best: Prime Simpsons satirized pop culture, while Zombie Simpsons ''is'' the pop culture being satirized.

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* To a degree, Cartoon Network's two most sucessful successful (mini)series ''WesternAnimation/OverTheGardenWall'' and ''WesternAnimation/InfinityTrain'' can be considered this. Both series bear similar aspects, such as a protagonist trapped in a an EldritchLocation setting, and coming with come to terms with a change in your life [[spoiler:(Wirt learning to appreciate his younger half-brother in the former and Tulip's being able to deal with her parents divorce in the latter.)]] but differ greatly in setting. While the former has elements derived primarily from 19th-20th century [[FantasyAmericana Americana fiction]], the latter is ambiented in a mid-20th SciFi inspired environment. While OTGW only has the [[TheLostWoods Unknown]] as the principal setting, Infinity Train allows the main character to explore the vastly different worlds contained in the [[CoolTrain train's cars.]]
* ''WesternAnimation/WallE'' has been described as a LighterAndSofter SpiritualAdaptation of Creator/MikeJudge's film ''Film/{{Idiocracy}}'', both being comedies depicting futures in which consumerism and low-brow culture run amok have left humanity breathtakingly stupid, unable to manage things for themselves -- complete with Earth being covered in the TrashOfTheTitans. A critical difference, however, is in the roads they take to get there, and where their societies ultimately ended up. ''Idiocracy''[='=]s dystopia came about as the result of the stupid (coded as contemporary {{Lower Class Lout}}s) outbreeding the smart (producing what some have criticized as a [[SlobsVersusSnobs classist, or even eugenicist, subtext]]), causing society to decay to the point where, by the year 2505, the world is facing famine due to the decision to [[TooDumbToLive irrigate crops with]] [[SaltTheEarth electrolyte-filled energy drinks]] purely on the basis of marketing hype. ''WALL•E'', on the other hand, has maintained an advanced, high-tech society -- and in fact, this is precisely what destroyed them. By delegating all responsibility to the robots, humanity became a race of lazy, [[BigFatFuture overweight]], [[ManChild infantilized]] slobs who can't do anything for themselves and need their robotic assistants to cater to their every whim. In short, while the dystopia in ''Idiocracy'' is portrayed as the LogicalExtreme of lower-class "trailer park" culture run amok, that of ''WALL•E'' is portrayed as the logical extreme of middle-class consumerism run amok.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'':
** In its early years, it was this to virtually all of the {{Dom Com}}s that had proliferated on American television since TheFifties, such as ''Series/LeaveItToBeaver'', ''Series/TheBradyBunch'', ''Series/TheWaltons'', and ''Series/TheCosbyShow'', offering a far more satirical take on the idealized nuclear family with ([[SeinfeldIsUnfunny for the time]]) a lot of blue humor and outlandish behavior from the main characters. Many MoralGuardians, including US President UsefulNotes/GeorgeHWBush, saw its subversion and parody of sitcom tropes as [[TheNewRockAndRoll undermining family values]], to which the writers of ''The Simpsons'' responded by carrying on a FriendlyRivalry with Bush and frequently making jokes about him throughout TheNineties, culminating in an episode where Bush briefly moves to Springfield post-presidency.
**
According to Super Eyepatch Wolf in [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KqFNbCcyFkk "The Fall Of The Simpsons: How It Happened",]] ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' in modern times (colloquially known as "[[SeasonalRot Zombie Simpsons]]") has more or less become the antithesis of ''itself'' back in its prime. The characters in Prime Simpsons were satires of character archetypes in the wholesome family sitcoms that came before it, but also had developed personalities, and jokes in the series had to be written around those personalities, while in Zombie Simpsons they're generic characters with simple personalities that can be form fit into whatever unrelated jokes the writers want to write (i.e. Ned Flanders initially being a left-handed, all-loving [[TheAce Ace]] who's also a devoted Christian, [[{{Flanderization}} and eventually just becoming a vehicle for jabs at Christians and Conservatives.]]) Its relationship with celebrities changed as well; in Prime Simpsons actual real-life celebrities rarely appeared, instead opting for {{Lawyer Friendly Cameo}}s voiced by one of the regular voice actors, or having celebrity cameos voice new one-off characters who look nothing like them (Music/MichaelJackson appearing as a mental patient who thinks he's Michael Jackson being one of the most famous examples,) while in Zombie Simpsons celebrities appearing as themselves became the norm (with one of the Simpsons even blatantly pointing them out as a RunningGag.) One section says it best: Prime Simpsons satirized pop culture, while Zombie Simpsons ''is'' the pop culture being satirized.


* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'' was set during the time of the prequel trilogy and used the main characters from that trilogy and focused mostly on standalone episodes. ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsRebels'' went to the original trilogy, used original characters as protagonists, and made more use of serial, arc-based storytelling.

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* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'' ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsRebels'' is both the Spiritual Successor and Spiritual Antithesis to ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars''. ''The Clone Wars'' was set during the time of the prequel trilogy Prequel Trilogy and used the main characters from that trilogy and focused mostly on standalone episodes. ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsRebels'' episodes while ''Rebels'' went to the original trilogy, Original Trilogy, used original characters as protagonists, and made more use of serial, arc-based storytelling.


* ''WesternAnimation/{{Hilda}}'' is this to ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls''. Both shows involve a group of kids having adventures that deal with supernatural occurrences. the key differences between both shows is that Gravity Falls has a MythArc that leads to several conspiracies and an interdimensional being wanting to take over Earth, Hilda is more of a SliceOfLife series with occasional continuity. Also, while the citizens of Gravity Falls are unaware of the paranormal [[note]] Which was later revealed that a secret cult has been [[LaserGuidedAmnesia wiping the townsfolk's memories of any supernatural occurrence]]. [[/note]], the citizens of Trolberg are quite aware of most of the paranormal creatures running about.

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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Hilda}}'' is this to ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls''. Both shows involve a group of kids having adventures that deal with supernatural occurrences. the key differences between both shows is that Gravity Falls ''Gravity Falls'' has a MythArc that leads to several conspiracies and an interdimensional being wanting to take over Earth, Hilda ''Hilda'' is more of a SliceOfLife series with occasional continuity. Also, while the citizens of Gravity Falls are unaware of the paranormal [[note]] Which was later revealed that a secret cult has been [[LaserGuidedAmnesia wiping the townsfolk's memories of any supernatural occurrence]]. [[/note]], the citizens of Trolberg are quite aware of most of the paranormal creatures running about.


* ''WesternAnimation/{{Hilda}}'' is this to ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls''. Both shows involve a group of kids having adventures that deal with supernatural occurrences. the key differences between both shows is that Gravity Falls has a MythArc that leads to several conspiracies and an interdimensional being wanting to take over Earth, Hilda is more of a SliceOfLife series with occasional continuity. Also, while the citizens of Gravity Falls are unaware of the paranormal [[note]] Which was later revealed that a secret cult has been [[LaserGuidedAmnesia wiping the townsflok's memories of any supernatural occurrence]]. [[/note]], the citizens of Trolberg are quite aware of most of the paranormal creatures running about.

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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Hilda}}'' is this to ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls''. Both shows involve a group of kids having adventures that deal with supernatural occurrences. the key differences between both shows is that Gravity Falls has a MythArc that leads to several conspiracies and an interdimensional being wanting to take over Earth, Hilda is more of a SliceOfLife series with occasional continuity. Also, while the citizens of Gravity Falls are unaware of the paranormal [[note]] Which was later revealed that a secret cult has been [[LaserGuidedAmnesia wiping the townsflok's townsfolk's memories of any supernatural occurrence]]. [[/note]], the citizens of Trolberg are quite aware of most of the paranormal creatures running about.


* ''WesternAnimation/{{Hilda}}'' is this to ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls''. Both shows involve a group of kids having adventures that deal with supernatural occurrences. the key differences between both shows is that Gravity Falls has a MythArc that leads to several conspiracies and an interdimensional being wanting to take over Earth, Hilda is more of a SliceOfLife series with occasional continuity. Also, while the citizens of Gravity Falls are unaware of the paranormal [[note]] Which was later revealed that a cult has been [[LaserGuidedAmnesia wiping the townsflok's memories of any supernatural occurrence]]. [[/note]], the citizens of Trolberg are quite aware of most of the paranormal creatures running about.

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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Hilda}}'' is this to ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls''. Both shows involve a group of kids having adventures that deal with supernatural occurrences. the key differences between both shows is that Gravity Falls has a MythArc that leads to several conspiracies and an interdimensional being wanting to take over Earth, Hilda is more of a SliceOfLife series with occasional continuity. Also, while the citizens of Gravity Falls are unaware of the paranormal [[note]] Which was later revealed that a secret cult has been [[LaserGuidedAmnesia wiping the townsflok's memories of any supernatural occurrence]]. [[/note]], the citizens of Trolberg are quite aware of most of the paranormal creatures running about.

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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Hilda}}'' is this to ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls''. Both shows involve a group of kids having adventures that deal with supernatural occurrences. the key differences between both shows is that Gravity Falls has a MythArc that leads to several conspiracies and an interdimensional being wanting to take over Earth, Hilda is more of a SliceOfLife series with occasional continuity. Also, while the citizens of Gravity Falls are unaware of the paranormal [[note]] Which was later revealed that a cult has been [[LaserGuidedAmnesia wiping the townsflok's memories of any supernatural occurrence]]. [[/note]], the citizens of Trolberg are quite aware of most of the paranormal creatures running about.


** The distinction can also be seen by comparing both shows' respective main characters. The alcoholic grandfather Rick Sanchez is a counterpart to both Abe and Homer Simpson, but whereas Abe's family disrespects and marginalizes him, Rick dominates his family, and whereas Homer is stupid and puts his children in peril through well-meaning incompetence, Rick is a genius and does so out of a reckless desire to challenge his family. Jerry and Beth Smith are also quite similar to Homer and Marge Simpson in their respective roles as the mediocre BumblingDad and his wife. Homer, however, is the clear patriarch of the Simpsons, the show treating his flaws as lovable, and while Marge is often frustrated with him, she is ultimately satisfied in her role as a stay-at-home {{housewife}} and resolves all her problems with Homer by the end of each episode. Jerry, meanwhile, is rarely excused for his faults so easily and is shown to have little control over his household, while Beth is the primary breadwinner in the family and fully aware that she is Jerry's intellectual superior, often feeling that he is holding her back. Finally, Summer Smith is Lisa Simpson's counterpart as the intelligent daughter who serves as the show's moral center, but whereas Lisa is a nerdy overachiever who is presented as having little interest in "girly" things, Summer is an unapologetic GirlyGirl.

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** The distinction can also be seen by comparing both shows' respective main characters. The alcoholic grandfather Rick Sanchez is a counterpart to both Abe and Homer Simpson, but whereas Abe's family disrespects and marginalizes him, Rick dominates his family, and whereas Homer is stupid and puts his children in peril through well-meaning incompetence, Rick is a genius and does so out of a reckless desire to challenge his family. Jerry and Beth Smith are also quite similar to Homer and Marge Simpson in their respective roles as the mediocre BumblingDad and his wife. Homer, however, is the clear patriarch of the Simpsons, the show treating his flaws as lovable, and while Marge is often frustrated with him, she is ultimately satisfied in her role as a stay-at-home {{housewife}} and resolves all her problems with Homer by the end of each episode. Jerry, meanwhile, is rarely excused for his faults so easily and is shown to have little control over his household, while Beth is the primary breadwinner in the family and fully aware that she is Jerry's intellectual superior, often feeling that he is holding her back. Bart is a grade-school AntiRoleModel with an attitude; while Morty is a much more pessimistic OrdinaryHighSchoolStudent. Bart's stories usually have him causing trouble on his own or alongside someone else; while Morty is almost always coerced into the adventure by no fault of his own, and his own decisions almost always end in disaster. Finally, Summer Smith is Lisa Simpson's counterpart as the intelligent daughter who serves as the show's moral center, but whereas Lisa is a nerdy overachiever who is presented as having little interest in "girly" things, Summer is an unapologetic GirlyGirl.


* ''WesternAnimation/RickAndMorty'' and ''WesternAnimation/BojackHorseman'', both praised as being defining adult-focused animated series of the 2010s, can be considered antitheses to each other: both center on aging alcoholics failing interpersonal relationships and self-destructive behaviors, but go about it in opposite ways: Rick is a scientist, brilliant but personally abhorrent, while Bojack is an entertainer, not particularly skilled, but handsome and charming (his handsomeness is a case of InformedAttractiveness since he's a FunnyAnimal). Rick is stuck in a middleclass lifestyle with his disfunctional family, but is essentially all-powerful during his adventures; Bojack is incredibly wealthy and priviledged, but too incompetent and depressed to do anything with it. Rick's sidekick is naive and anxious, Bojack's is a laid-back moocher. In tone, ''Rick and Morty'' reject political correctness and embrace escapism, while ''Bojack Horseman'' presents progressive morals and somber consequences for the title character's behavior.

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* ''WesternAnimation/RickAndMorty'' and ''WesternAnimation/BojackHorseman'', both praised as being defining adult-focused animated series of the 2010s, can be considered antitheses to each other: both center on aging alcoholics failing interpersonal relationships and self-destructive behaviors, but go about it in opposite ways: Rick is a scientist, brilliant but personally abhorrent, while Bojack is an entertainer, not particularly skilled, but handsome and charming (his handsomeness is a case of InformedAttractiveness since he's a FunnyAnimal). Rick is stuck in a middleclass middle-class lifestyle with his disfunctional dysfunctional family, but is essentially all-powerful during his adventures; Bojack is incredibly wealthy and priviledged, privileged, but too incompetent and depressed to do anything with it. Rick's sidekick Morty is naive and anxious, Bojack's sidekick Todd is a laid-back moocher. In tone, ''Rick and Morty'' reject rejects political correctness and embrace escapism, while ''Bojack Horseman'' presents progressive morals and somber consequences for the title character's behavior.behavior. ''Rick and Morty'' is a surreal sci-fi show, while ''Bojack'', despite featuring talking animals, is more down to earth.

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* ''WesternAnimation/RickAndMorty'' and ''WesternAnimation/BojackHorseman'', both praised as being defining adult-focused animated series of the 2010s, can be considered antitheses to each other: both center on aging alcoholics failing interpersonal relationships and self-destructive behaviors, but go about it in opposite ways: Rick is a scientist, brilliant but personally abhorrent, while Bojack is an entertainer, not particularly skilled, but handsome and charming (his handsomeness is a case of InformedAttractiveness since he's a FunnyAnimal). Rick is stuck in a middleclass lifestyle with his disfunctional family, but is essentially all-powerful during his adventures; Bojack is incredibly wealthy and priviledged, but too incompetent and depressed to do anything with it. Rick's sidekick is naive and anxious, Bojack's is a laid-back moocher. In tone, ''Rick and Morty'' reject political correctness and embrace escapism, while ''Bojack Horseman'' presents progressive morals and somber consequences for the title character's behavior.

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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'' is this to ''WesternAnimation/{{Bonkers}}''. Both are wacky 90s cartoons made by rivals WB and Disney respectively. Both shows' characters also star in in-universe cartoons. While ''Animaniacs'' has the Warner siblings rebel against authority, ''Bonkers'' features the titular character serving authority (the police force). Yakko, Wakko, and Dot are quite clever and frequently outsmart their enemies, while Bonkers D. Bobcat is more naive. Finally, ''Animaniacs'' is more popular and well-remembered than ''Bonkers'', and got [[WesternAnimation/Animaniacs2020 its own reboot]] while ''Bonkers'' is more forgotten (he did make a cameo in an episode of ''WesternAnimation/DuckTales2017'' though).

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