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History Series / TheAmericanExperience

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* TheKenBurnsEffect: Ken Burns himself has contributed several installments to the series, including ''Empire of the Air'', a look at the early days of radio in America. Likewise Ken's brother Ric, including an award-winning 1992 profile of the Donner Party.


For the first several years, the program was hosted by historian David [=McCullough=], best known for his role as narrator of Creator/KenBurns' ''The Civil War''. [=McCullough=] narrated several episodes himself, including "The Hurricane of '38" (1993) and "Abraham and Mary Lincoln: A House Divided" (2001). The program no longer has a host, but new episodes are typically narrated by actors Oliver Platt and Michael Murphy.

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For the first several years, the program was hosted by historian David [=McCullough=], best known for his role as narrator of Creator/KenBurns' ''The Civil War''. [=McCullough=] narrated several episodes himself, including "The Hurricane of '38" (1993) and "Abraham and Mary Lincoln: A House Divided" (2001). The program no longer has a host, but new episodes are typically narrated by actors Oliver Platt Creator/OliverPlatt and Michael Murphy.


Each season, particularly early on, generally has had 15-16 episodes, each focusing on such topics as natural disasters, technology, war, the old West, civil rights, crime, politics, and biographies of American icons, among other things (Presidential biographies in particular are this program's claim to fame, with the three-part "Nixon" being the first and the four-part "LBJ" receiving some of the greatest critical acclaim of them all). Until 2007, seasons started in the fall; beginning with the 20th season in 2008, new seasons commenced in the winter (the last season to premiere in the fall was the 23rd season, in 2010). Originally broadcast on Mondays, the program was moved to Tuesdays beginning with its 24th season in 2012, as part of a larger drive towards brand unity at PBS.

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Each season, particularly early on, generally has had 15-16 episodes, each focusing on such topics as natural disasters, technology, war, the old West, civil rights, crime, politics, and biographies of American icons, among other things (Presidential biographies in particular are this program's claim to fame, with the three-part "Nixon" "[[UsefulNotes/RichardNixon Nixon]]" being the first and the four-part "LBJ" "[[UsefulNotes/LyndonJohnson LBJ]]" receiving some of the greatest critical acclaim of them all). Until 2007, seasons started in the fall; beginning with the 20th season in 2008, new seasons commenced in the winter (the last season to premiere in the fall was the 23rd season, in 2010). Originally broadcast on Mondays, the program was moved to Tuesdays beginning with its 24th season in 2012, as part of a larger drive towards brand unity at PBS.



** The two-part biography "Walt Disney" includes a speech from Uncle Walt which includes a few uses of "damn". Particularly in the '40s, when the only mainstream Hollywood picture to use that word was ''Film/GoneWithTheWind'' (and even then just because the original novel also had Rhett Butler's famous parting words to Scarlett O'Hara as "My dear, I don't give a damn"), that was quite shocking.

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** The two-part biography "Walt Disney" "Creator/WaltDisney" includes a speech from Uncle Walt which includes a few uses of "damn". Particularly in the '40s, when the only mainstream Hollywood picture to use that word was ''Film/GoneWithTheWind'' (and even then just because the original novel also had Rhett Butler's famous parting words to Scarlett O'Hara as "My dear, I don't give a damn"), that was quite shocking.



** Documentaries dealing with the African-American civil rights struggles of the 1950s and 1960s are also typically broadcast with the "n"-word uncensored (not "Negro"; the other one), though it's almost always heard in archival footage.

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** Documentaries dealing with the African-American civil rights struggles of the 1950s and 1960s '60s are also typically broadcast with the "n"-word uncensored (not "Negro"; the other one), though it's almost always heard in archival footage.


** Several programs, including ''LBJ'', have had their titles replaced entirely in newer broadcasts. ''Nixon'', on the other hand, subverts this by retaining the original episode titles at the start of each part, even in the 2016 rebroadcast.

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** Several programs, episodes, including ''LBJ'', "LBJ", have had their titles replaced entirely in newer broadcasts. ''Nixon'', "Nixon", on the other hand, subverts this by retaining the original episode titles at the start of each part, even in the 2016 rebroadcast.



** Presidential biographies tend to get this treatment during election years, with the first known such event being a rebroadcast of ''Nixon'' during the 5th season.

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** Presidential biographies tend to get this treatment during election years, with the first known such event being a rebroadcast of ''Nixon'' "Nixon" during the 5th fifth season.


** The two-part biography ''Walt Disney'' includes a speech from Uncle Walt which includes a few uses of "damn". Particularly in the '40s, when the only mainstream Hollywood picture to use that word was ''Film/GoneWithTheWind'' (and even then just because the original novel also had Rhett Butler's famous parting words to Scarlett O'Hara as "My dear, I don't give a damn"), that was quite shocking.

to:

** The two-part biography ''Walt Disney'' "Walt Disney" includes a speech from Uncle Walt which includes a few uses of "damn". Particularly in the '40s, when the only mainstream Hollywood picture to use that word was ''Film/GoneWithTheWind'' (and even then just because the original novel also had Rhett Butler's famous parting words to Scarlett O'Hara as "My dear, I don't give a damn"), that was quite shocking.


Each season, particularly early on, generally has had 15-16 episodes, each focusing on such topics as natural disasters, technology, war, the old West, civil rights, politics, and biographies of American icons, among other things (Presidential biographies in particular are this program's claim to fame, with the three-part "Nixon" being the first and the four-part "LBJ" receiving some of the greatest critical acclaim of them all). Until 2007, seasons started in the fall; beginning with the 20th season in 2008, new seasons commenced in the winter (the last season to premiere in the fall was the 23rd season, in 2010). Originally broadcast on Mondays, the program was moved to Tuesdays beginning with its 24th season in 2012, as part of a larger drive towards brand unity at PBS.

to:

Each season, particularly early on, generally has had 15-16 episodes, each focusing on such topics as natural disasters, technology, war, the old West, civil rights, crime, politics, and biographies of American icons, among other things (Presidential biographies in particular are this program's claim to fame, with the three-part "Nixon" being the first and the four-part "LBJ" receiving some of the greatest critical acclaim of them all). Until 2007, seasons started in the fall; beginning with the 20th season in 2008, new seasons commenced in the winter (the last season to premiere in the fall was the 23rd season, in 2010). Originally broadcast on Mondays, the program was moved to Tuesdays beginning with its 24th season in 2012, as part of a larger drive towards brand unity at PBS.


Each season, particularly early on, generally has had 15-16 episodes, each focusing on such topics as natural disasters, technology, war, the old West, civil rights, politics, and biographies of American icons, among other things (Presidential biographies in particular are this program's claim to fame, with the three-part event ''Nixon'' being the first and the four-part event ''LBJ'' receiving some of the greatest critical acclaim of them all). Until 2007, seasons started in the fall; beginning with the 20th season in 2008, new seasons commenced in the winter (the last season to premiere in the fall was the 23rd season, in 2010). Originally broadcast on Mondays, the program was moved to Tuesdays beginning with its 24th season in 2012, as part of a larger drive towards brand unity at PBS.

For the first several years, the program was hosted by historian David [=McCullough=], best known for his role as narrator of Creator/KenBurns' ''The Civil War''. [=McCullough=] narrated several episodes himself, including ''The Hurricane of '38'' (1993) and ''Abraham and Mary Lincoln: A House Divided'' (2001). The program no longer has a host, but new episodes are typically narrated by actors Oliver Platt and Michael Murphy.

to:

Each season, particularly early on, generally has had 15-16 episodes, each focusing on such topics as natural disasters, technology, war, the old West, civil rights, politics, and biographies of American icons, among other things (Presidential biographies in particular are this program's claim to fame, with the three-part event ''Nixon'' "Nixon" being the first and the four-part event ''LBJ'' "LBJ" receiving some of the greatest critical acclaim of them all). Until 2007, seasons started in the fall; beginning with the 20th season in 2008, new seasons commenced in the winter (the last season to premiere in the fall was the 23rd season, in 2010). Originally broadcast on Mondays, the program was moved to Tuesdays beginning with its 24th season in 2012, as part of a larger drive towards brand unity at PBS.

For the first several years, the program was hosted by historian David [=McCullough=], best known for his role as narrator of Creator/KenBurns' ''The Civil War''. [=McCullough=] narrated several episodes himself, including ''The "The Hurricane of '38'' '38" (1993) and ''Abraham "Abraham and Mary Lincoln: A House Divided'' Divided" (2001). The program no longer has a host, but new episodes are typically narrated by actors Oliver Platt and Michael Murphy.


** Documentaries dealing with the African-American civil rights struggles of the 1950s and 1960s are also typically broadcast with the "n"-word uncensored (no, not "Negro"), though it's almost always heard in archival footage.

to:

** Documentaries dealing with the African-American civil rights struggles of the 1950s and 1960s are also typically broadcast with the "n"-word uncensored (no, not "Negro"), (not "Negro"; the other one), though it's almost always heard in archival footage.


* LongRunners: For nearly 30 seasons, this has been PBS's flagship American history series.

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* LongRunners: For nearly 30 seasons, this has been PBS's flagship American history series.series. Its 30th season premiered in October 2018 with a two-part look at American circuses.


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** Documentaries dealing with the African-American civil rights struggles of the 1950s and 1960s are also typically broadcast with the "n"-word uncensored (no, not "Negro"), though it's almost always heard in archival footage.


Each season, particularly early on, has generally had 15-16 episodes, each focusing on such topics as natural disasters, technology, war, the old West, civil rights, politics, and biographies of American icons, among other things (Presidential biographies in particular are this program's claim to fame, with the three-part event ''Nixon'' being the first and the four-part event ''LBJ'' receiving some of the greatest critical acclaim of them all). Until 2007, seasons started in the fall; beginning with the 20th season in 2008, new seasons commenced in the winter (the last season to premiere in the fall was the 23rd season, in 2010). Originally broadcast on Mondays, the program was moved to Tuesdays beginning with its 24th season in 2012, as part of a larger drive towards brand unity at PBS.

to:

Each season, particularly early on, has generally has had 15-16 episodes, each focusing on such topics as natural disasters, technology, war, the old West, civil rights, politics, and biographies of American icons, among other things (Presidential biographies in particular are this program's claim to fame, with the three-part event ''Nixon'' being the first and the four-part event ''LBJ'' receiving some of the greatest critical acclaim of them all). Until 2007, seasons started in the fall; beginning with the 20th season in 2008, new seasons commenced in the winter (the last season to premiere in the fall was the 23rd season, in 2010). Originally broadcast on Mondays, the program was moved to Tuesdays beginning with its 24th season in 2012, as part of a larger drive towards brand unity at PBS.


Each season, particularly early on, generally had 15-16 episodes, each focusing on such topics as natural disasters, technology, war, the old West, civil rights, politics, and biographies of American icons, among other things (Presidential biographies in particular are this program's claim to fame, with the three-part event ''Nixon'' being the first and the four-part event ''LBJ'' receiving some of the greatest critical acclaim of them all). Until 2007, seasons started in the fall; beginning with the 20th season in 2008, new seasons commenced in the winter (the last season to premiere in the fall was the 23rd season, in 2010). Originally broadcast on Mondays, the program was moved to Tuesdays beginning with its 24th season in 2012, as part of a larger drive towards brand unity at PBS.

to:

Each season, particularly early on, has generally had 15-16 episodes, each focusing on such topics as natural disasters, technology, war, the old West, civil rights, politics, and biographies of American icons, among other things (Presidential biographies in particular are this program's claim to fame, with the three-part event ''Nixon'' being the first and the four-part event ''LBJ'' receiving some of the greatest critical acclaim of them all). Until 2007, seasons started in the fall; beginning with the 20th season in 2008, new seasons commenced in the winter (the last season to premiere in the fall was the 23rd season, in 2010). Originally broadcast on Mondays, the program was moved to Tuesdays beginning with its 24th season in 2012, as part of a larger drive towards brand unity at PBS.


''The American Experience'' is a history documentary series originating on Creator/{{PBS}} which premiered in 1988 with an episode on the 1906 UsefulNotes/SanFrancisco earthquake.

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''The American Experience'' is a history documentary series originating on Creator/{{PBS}} Creator/{{PBS}}, which premiered in 1988 with an episode on the 1906 UsefulNotes/SanFrancisco earthquake.


''The American Experience'' is a history documentary series originating on Creator/{{PBS}} which premiered in 1988 with a documentary on the 1906 UsefulNotes/SanFrancisco earthquake.

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''The American Experience'' is a history documentary series originating on Creator/{{PBS}} which premiered in 1988 with a documentary an episode on the 1906 UsefulNotes/SanFrancisco earthquake.

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[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/47238767_dcff_4079_ae3a_efe02812a00f.jpeg]]


'''The American Experience''' is a history documentary series originating on Creator/{{PBS}} which premiered in 1988 with a documentary on the 1906 UsefulNotes/SanFrancisco earthquake.

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'''The ''The American Experience''' Experience'' is a history documentary series originating on Creator/{{PBS}} which premiered in 1988 with a documentary on the 1906 UsefulNotes/SanFrancisco earthquake.


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