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** A couple of Seasons prior, JJ also fell victim to their "Health and Accident Insurance Program," as in "If I don't join, they were gonna ensure that I had an accident to my health."

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** A couple of Seasons seasons prior, JJ also fell victim to their "Health and Accident Insurance Program," as in "If I don't didn't join, they were gonna ensure that I had an accident to my health."


* ScrewTheMoneyIHaveRules: As much as they struggled to make ends meet, James and Florida will readily turn down an opportunity if it went against morals principles. Such as when James is offered a job from a televangelist friend, which he’d initially accepted. But when he saw the impact his doing so would have on his children, (He would of been feigning ailments so that he could be “healed“) he changed his mind. Likewise, Florida turning down a TV commercial spot upon learning she’d be selling a product made mostly of alcohol.

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* ScrewTheMoneyIHaveRules: As much as they struggled to make ends meet, James and Florida will readily turn down an opportunity if it went against morals principles. Such as when James is offered a job from a televangelist friend, which he’d initially accepted. But when he saw the impact his doing so would have on his children, (He children (he would of have been feigning ailments so that he could be “healed“) he changed his mind. Likewise, Florida turning down a TV commercial spot upon learning she’d be selling a product made mostly of alcohol.

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* BrokenTears: After powering her way straight through [[spoiler: James's funeral and reception at their apartment]], Florida badly worries her family as she just keeps on without blinking. But when all the guests, even Wilona, are gone, then and there she [[spoiler: throws and breaks a large glass punch bowl, yelling "Damn! DAMN! DAAAAAMN!" as her family is finally able to comfort her in her darkest hour.]]

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* CreatorCameo: Ernie Barnes, the artist behind JJ's paintings, appeared in a few episodes as one of Sweet Daddy's goons.


* ScrewTheMoney,IHaveRules: As much as they struggled to make ends meet, James and Florida will readily turn down an opportunity if it went against morals principles. Such as when James is offered a job from a televangelist friend, which he’d initially accepted. But when he saw the impact his doing so would have on his children, (He would of been feigning ailments so that he could be “healed “) he changed his mid.Likewise, Florida turning down a TV commercial spot upon learning she’d be selling a product made mostly of alcohol.

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* ScrewTheMoney,IHaveRules: ScrewTheMoneyIHaveRules: As much as they struggled to make ends meet, James and Florida will readily turn down an opportunity if it went against morals principles. Such as when James is offered a job from a televangelist friend, which he’d initially accepted. But when he saw the impact his doing so would have on his children, (He would of been feigning ailments so that he could be “healed “) “healed“) he changed his mid.mind. Likewise, Florida turning down a TV commercial spot upon learning she’d be selling a product made mostly of alcohol.

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* ScrewTheMoney,IHaveRules: As much as they struggled to make ends meet, James and Florida will readily turn down an opportunity if it went against morals principles. Such as when James is offered a job from a televangelist friend, which he’d initially accepted. But when he saw the impact his doing so would have on his children, (He would of been feigning ailments so that he could be “healed “) he changed his mid.Likewise, Florida turning down a TV commercial spot upon learning she’d be selling a product made mostly of alcohol.

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* BreakoutCharacter: Jimmie "JJ" Walker. One of the biggest examples of the 70s.


* YankTheDogsChain: A number of episodes revolved around the characters trying to improve their situation and absolutely failing by the time the credits rolled. The most [[TearJerker heartwrenching]] example, though, has to be in the fourth-season premiere: James has gotten a promising new job in Mississippi and the family plans on moving to join him, leaving the ghetto behind forever! [[spoiler: Then James dies in a car wreck and they're stuck.]]

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* YankTheDogsChain: A number of episodes revolved around the characters trying to improve their situation and absolutely failing by the time the credits rolled. The most [[TearJerker heartwrenching]] example, though, has to be in the fourth-season premiere: James has gotten a promising new job in Mississippi and the family plans on moving to join him, leaving the ghetto behind forever! [[spoiler: Then James dies in a car wreck and they're stuck.]]
stuck.


* BigBrotherInstinct: JJ to Thelma and Michael. For all his goofiness and constant teasing of them, he makes it abundantly clear that the best way to set off his BerserkButton is to harm either of them.

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* BigBrotherInstinct: JJ to Thelma and Michael. For all his goofiness and constant teasing of them, he makes it abundantly clear that the best way to set off press his BerserkButton is to harm either of them.them.
--> ''(to Keith after he slaps Thelma)'' "You better have a good excuse for this, or I'm going to put you in every shot glass across Chicago."

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* TheTalk: Willona stubbornly refuses to have this with Penny, insisting that ''she'' will decide when Penny is ready, even though it's obvious that she is--aside from the fact that one of her classmates is pregnant, Penny has clearly started pubertal development and is displaying the natural curiosity for a child her age.

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* {{Mondegreen}}: As noted by ''Series/ChappellesShow'', the indistinguishable lyric of the theme song "Hangin' in and jivin'", is often mistakenly deciphered as "Hangin' in a chow line".


* CatchPhrase: JJ's "DYN-O-MITE!" and less frequently, "Well, well, what can I say?"

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* CatchPhrase: JJ's "DYN-O-MITE!" and less frequently, "Well, well, you know, what can I say?"


The series finale aired on August 1, 1979, with a [[HappilyEverAfter Mega-Happy Ending]]. Reruns can be seen daily on TV One and occasionally on Nick at Nite's TV Land. All six seasons are available on DVD.

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The series finale aired on August 1, 1979, with a [[HappilyEverAfter Mega-Happy Ending]]. Reruns can be seen daily on TV One One, on Get TV (as of December 2017) and occasionally on Nick at Nite's TV Land. All six seasons are available on DVD.

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* WealthsInAName: Played with in the case of Penny, whose name was a pun on her full name, "Millicent". She was poor, as were all the families in that series, but she considered herself wealthy once adopted by Willona.


* ChristmasCake : Discussed in the Season 1 episode "Florida, the Matchmaker." Willona points out that an unmarried man over 30 is a carefree bachelor, while a woman over 30 who is unmarried (or, in Willona's case, divorced) is considered over the hill. Willona remains happily unmarried throughout the series.


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* OldMaid: Discussed in the Season 1 episode "Florida, the Matchmaker." Willona points out that an unmarried man over 30 is a carefree bachelor, while a woman over 30 who is unmarried (or, in Willona's case, divorced) is considered over the hill. Willona remains happily unmarried throughout the series.

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