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** Season 1 had just ten pieces, whereas Seasons 2 and 3 had 12, Seasons 4 and 5 had 13, and Season 6 had 14. Season 1 also had multiple prize trips that the teams could win. Missions were typically presented with a history lesson that tied in with what contestants would have to do. Finally, the way the pieces (and prize trips) were given off when a team was eliminated was a lot more complicated than in every season afterwards: on E1, they would be up for grabs in the next Endurance Mission. E2 onwards, the eliminated team selects a team to give their pieces to (E5 and E6 allowed eliminated teams with multiple pieces to split their pieces among multiple teams if they wanted to) with the exception of the third place team whose pieces were up for grabs in one last endurance mission before the final 2 head to the temple of fate.

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** Season 1 had just ten pieces, whereas Seasons 2 and 3 had 12, Seasons 4 and 5 had 13, and Season 6 had 14. Season 1 also had multiple prize trips that the teams could win. Missions were typically presented with a history lesson that tied in with what contestants would have to do. Finally, the way the pieces (and prize trips) were given off when a team was eliminated was a lot more complicated than in every season afterwards: different: on E1, they all pieces would be up for grabs in play after the first endurance mission. When a team is eliminated, their pieces are the prize in the next Endurance Mission. E2 onwards, following endurance mission as well as the option for the winning team to switch their trip for the one that the eliminated team carried. If they switched, the trip the winning team originally had is out of the game. If they didn't switch, the trip the eliminated team had was gone. E2 onwards: Endurance missions usually give out 1 piece that was not held by one of the teams at that point. When a team is eliminated, they can selects a team to give their pieces to (E5 and E6 allowed eliminated teams with multiple pieces to split their pieces among multiple teams if they wanted to) with the exception of the third place team whose pieces were up for grabs in one last endurance mission before the final 2 head to the temple of fate.fate. There was also only one possible trip available as the grand prize.


** Mentioned in ''Tehachapi'': When Green won the ''Hang 5'' endurance mission, Isaac and Jeszie argued over who to give the samedhi too. Isaac wanted to give it to Red as he was very close to Jonathan (Purple) and Amelia (Blue), both of whom seemed loyal to Green. Jeszie pointed out though that if Green won the following temple mission, Isaac would have to send at least one of them to temple.

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** Mentioned in ''Tehachapi'': When Green won the ''Hang 5'' endurance mission, Isaac and Jeszie argued over who to give the samedhi too.to. Isaac wanted to give it to Red as he was very close to Jonathan (Purple) and Amelia (Blue), both of whom seemed loyal to Green. Jeszie pointed out though that if Green won the following temple mission, Isaac would have to send at least one of them to temple.


* LuckBasedMission: Quite of few of the missions were this.

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* LuckBasedMission: Quite of A few of the missions were this.like this
** ''You're Fired'' from ''Hawaii''. Three balls (each with a number from 1 to 3) are launched with each team trying to catch them. To win the mission, your team must catch the ball that has the matching number to the ball JD has hidden until all of the balls are caught. Thus, while playing, the teams don't know which ball they need to catch to win.
** ''Color Coded'' from ''Hawaii''. Each team has a bunch of plates in front of them with 4 plates in each row. 1 plate in each row has a triangle on it and the team needs to accurately guess which plate its under to advance to the next row. If they don't get it, they must go back to the beginning. While the teams can memorialize past results, they have no clue in where the triangle will be in the advancing row.


** The Samadhi is usually this. It is typically a clay urn (log in ''High Sierras'') and the winner of the endurance missions usually gets to pick another team to receive it. The team with the samadhi will receive a disadvantage in the following temple mission which is represented by what is inside the jar. Disadvantages can reach from time delays/head starts (whichever is inconvenient for the mission), an extra task to complete in order to win or another element that hampers a teams chance of winning (there were even a couple of cases where the disadvantage was that the team was not allowed to compete in the mission). A few teams have managed to overcome the samadhi and still win the temple mission but it was rare for that to happen. A couple of samadhis were not inherently bad such as in ''Hawaii'' where one samadhi allowed the winning team to either take all of the pyramid pieces from another team or switch partners. A samadhi in ''High Sierras'' also permitted a partner switch.

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** The Samadhi is usually this. It is typically a clay urn (log in ''High Sierras'') and the winner of the endurance missions usually gets to pick another team to receive it. The team with the samadhi will receive a disadvantage in the following temple mission which is represented by what is inside the jar. Disadvantages can reach range from time delays/head starts (whichever is inconvenient for the mission), an extra task to complete in order to win or another element that hampers a teams chance of winning (there were even a couple of cases where the disadvantage was that the team was not allowed to compete in the mission). A few teams have managed to overcome the samadhi and still win the temple mission but it was rare for that to happen. A couple of samadhis were not inherently bad such as in ''Hawaii'' where one samadhi allowed the winning team to either take all of the pyramid pieces from another team or switch partners. A samadhi in ''High Sierras'' also permitted a partner switch.


* DidntThinkThisThrough: In ''High Sierras'' after Blue wins an endurance mission that grants them the power to switch 2 teams, Red and Green volunteer to switch as long as they give the power to switch teams to Red. It did not seem to cross the Blue team's minds that once Red was given the power, they could go back on their word and switch 2 other teams instead. This results in Blue and Gray being switched instead.

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* DidntThinkThisThrough: In ''High Sierras'' after Blue wins an endurance mission that grants them the power to switch 2 teams, Red and Green volunteer to switch as long as they give the power to switch teams to Red. It did not seem to cross Even though they considered the Blue team's minds possibility that Red could switch someone else once Red was given the power, they could go back on their word and switch 2 other teams instead.still give it to them. This results in Blue and Gray being switched instead.


** The Gray team, while not inherently suppose to be this but the performance of these teams throughout the series gained them this reputation. Four of the five gray teams featured on the show were the first colored teams to get eliminated (the one exception though were the champions of their season). Even JD noted in Endurance 2 that Gray seemed destined to be eliminated first. Zigzagged in season 1 where the gray team, due to the rules of the partner selection game, was the only team to start with 2 pyramid pieces instead of one and thus giving them an early lead [[spoiler: only to get sent home after losing the very first visit to the temple of fate]]. Averted in ''Fiji'' where there was no Gray team.

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** The Gray team, while not inherently suppose to be this but the performance of these teams throughout the series gained them this reputation. Four of the five gray teams featured on the show were the first colored teams to get eliminated (the one exception though were the champions of their season). Even JD noted in Endurance 2 that Gray seemed destined to be eliminated first. Connor from ''High Sierras'' also had a superstitious feeling regarding the color (it also happened to be the last color claimed in that season). Zigzagged in season 1 where the gray team, due to the rules of the partner selection game, was the only team to start with 2 pyramid pieces instead of one and thus giving them an early lead [[spoiler: only to get sent home after losing the very first visit to the temple of fate]]. Averted in ''Fiji'' where there was no Gray team.


** The main alliance in ''Fiji'' was Green and Orange. They have a "unofficial alliance" withe Red but did eventually turn against them in the final 4.

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** The main alliance in ''Fiji'' was Green and Orange. They have a "unofficial alliance" withe with Red but they did eventually turn against them in the final 4.


Endurance was a teen reality competition hosted by J.D. Roth that lasted six seasons from 2002 to 2008. Sixteen to twenty teenagers aged 12 to 15 would be placed in a remote location and compete in various missions as mixed gender teams of two for a grand prize trip.

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Endurance ''Endurance'' was a teen reality competition hosted by [[Series/FunHouse J.D. Roth Roth]] that lasted six seasons from 2002 to 2008.2008 on [[Creator/TheHub Discovery Kids]]. Sixteen to twenty teenagers aged 12 to 15 would be placed in a remote location and compete in various missions as mixed gender teams of two for a grand prize trip.



Before that, there was also Moolah Beach in 2001, which is indexed here as well.

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Before that, there was also Moolah Beach in 2001, a predecessor, ''Moolah Beach'', which aired on Creator/FoxKids in 2001; it is indexed here as well.


** Season 1 had just ten pieces, whereas Seasons 2 and 3 had 12, Seasons 4 and 5 had 13, and Season 6 had 14. Season 1 also had multiple prize trips that the teams could win. Missions were typically presented with a history lesson that tied in with what contestants would have to do. Finally, the way the pieces (and prize trips) were given off was a lot more complicated than in every season afterwards: on E1, they would be up for grabs in the next Endurance Mission. E2 onwards, the eliminated team selects a team to give their pieces to (E5 allowed eliminated teams with multiple pieces to split their pieces among multiple teams) with the exception of the third place team whose pieces were up for grabs in one last endurance mission.

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** Season 1 had just ten pieces, whereas Seasons 2 and 3 had 12, Seasons 4 and 5 had 13, and Season 6 had 14. Season 1 also had multiple prize trips that the teams could win. Missions were typically presented with a history lesson that tied in with what contestants would have to do. Finally, the way the pieces (and prize trips) were given off when a team was eliminated was a lot more complicated than in every season afterwards: on E1, they would be up for grabs in the next Endurance Mission. E2 onwards, the eliminated team selects a team to give their pieces to (E5 and E6 allowed eliminated teams with multiple pieces to split their pieces among multiple teams) teams if they wanted to) with the exception of the third place team whose pieces were up for grabs in one last endurance mission.mission before the final 2 head to the temple of fate.


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** In general, if an alliance makes it to the final 3, this is the result of the last temple mission if either team wins it. Only the winner is granted a spot in the final 2 as the other 2 teams must go to the temple of fate by default even if the winning team has a preference for who they want to compete in the finale with.

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* CrowdedCastShot: The intros to each episode show one for a few seconds. The first couple of episodes each season show a picture of each contestant (including those who are eliminated in the right to stay) while the episode following the formation of the last team will show a shot of all of the official teams on Endurance for that season.

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* CoordinatedClothes: In addition to the colored endurance outfits that teams wear when completing in a mission or when they are at the temple of fate, the contestants will often wear casual clothing that tends to be a similar to their team's color after they are paired.

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* TheAmazon: The winning team of the first endurance season won a trip to the Amazon forests. Some pictures of their time there was shown in the reunion special.


** To a smaller extent with Orange of the same season. They are informed they will be sent to temple with Blue. They believe a way to ensure their victory is to get Purple to tell Blue a temple strategy Orange is supposedly going to use (a similar technique that allowed Yellow to beat Gray). The problem is that Blue knows that Purple was responsible for planning the team switch between Connor and Taylor's backs and that they know Purple and Orange are allies. While Dakota goes through with the plan, Kelsey is aware of this flaw, which already made Blue skeptical, and does con
cede that the plan might be a ruse. Thus, Blue does not fall for it.

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** To a smaller extent with Orange of the same season. They are informed they will be sent to temple with Blue. They believe a way to ensure their victory is to get Purple to tell Blue a temple strategy Orange is supposedly going to use (a similar technique that allowed Yellow to beat Gray). The problem is that Blue knows that Purple was responsible for planning the team switch between Connor and Taylor's backs and that they know Purple and Orange are allies. While Dakota goes through with the plan, Kelsey is aware of this flaw, which already made Blue skeptical, and does con
cede
concede that the plan might be a ruse. Thus, Blue does not fall for it.


** [[spoiler: That same team managed it again in the final mission and the final game. The final mission, where the teams competed the fallen yellow team's two pieces, consisted of a boat race where teams could pick up to 4 four possible pieces (1 real, 3 decoy) along the way. Gray not only finished first (giving them 1 real piece automatically) but got all 4 of the pieces along the way which ensured they got the other one. For the finale, Gray team had 10 pieces before the game while Orange only accumulated 2. Gray managed to win in only 4 rounds, making it the shortest final game in the entire series.]]

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** [[spoiler: That same team managed it again in the final mission and the final game. The final mission, where the teams competed for the fallen yellow team's two pieces, consisted of a boat race where teams could pick up to 4 four possible pieces (1 real, 3 decoy) along the way. Gray not only finished first (giving them 1 real piece automatically) but got all 4 of the pieces along the way which ensured they got the other one. For the finale, Gray team had 10 pieces before the game while Orange only accumulated 2. Gray managed to win in only 4 rounds, making it the shortest final game in the entire series.]]


* AllThereInTheManual: Some of the information about the contestants, primarily what they were like before the show, tended to be placed on the discovery kids website rather than being mentioned in the show. Contestants typically are introduced as saying their name, age and place where they are from but only a couple per reason as an additional voice over statement about themselves or their approach to the game.

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* AllThereInTheManual: Some of the information about the contestants, primarily what they were like before the show, tended to be placed on the discovery kids website rather than being mentioned in the show. Contestants typically are introduced as saying their name, age and place where they are from but only a couple per reason as season got an additional voice over statement to talk about themselves or their approach to the game.

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