Follow TV Tropes

Following

History Series / DangerMan

Go To



* CelibateHero: John Drake does not romance women, although many of the women in the series show an obvious interest in him (and he in them). There are three exceptions: an episode called "The Black Book" in which he finds himself attracted to a female spy, and two later episodes featuring his frequent Disney co-star Susan Hampshire playing different characters, both of whom appear to successfully romance Drake.

to:

* CelibateHero: John Drake does not romance women, although many of the women in the series show an obvious interest in him (and he in them). There are three exceptions: an episode called "The Black Book" in which he finds himself attracted to a female spy, and two later episodes featuring his frequent Disney co-star Susan Hampshire playing different characters, both of whom appear to successfully romance Drake. Justified both in-universe (with Drake explaining in "The Black Book" why he can't get involved, and [=McGoohan's=] often-stated rationale that a man in Drake's position can't afford to have emotional ties and still expect to be effective.



* DownerEnding: Regularly, especially in the third season. Drake doesn't always win a clear victory and even if he does, there are rarely any "high five" moments.

to:

* DownerEnding: Regularly, especially in the third season. Drake doesn't always win a clear victory and even if he does, there are rarely any "high five" moments. Possibly epitomized by the ending of "Colony Three".



* MetaCasting: The last black and white episode "Not so Jolly Roger" guest-starred Patsy Ann Noble (later known as Trisha Noble), a popular singer just launching an acting career. Since the episode is set at a pirate radio station, it's not surprising that one of her songs is not only featured prominently, but Patsy Ann Noble gets a name-drop as her song is introduced by John Drake while Noble is standing next to him.
* NoHuggingNoKissing: Drake does not get involved with women, period. He occasionally flirts with them, and they clearly find him attractive, but he is never shown romancing them. One episode, "The Black Book", has him attracted to a young woman, but he [[ItsNotYouItsMyEnemies explains why he cannot get involved.]] The closest Drake comes is in two episodes guest starring Susan Hampshire (playing different, but similar characters in each), one of which ends with Drake and Hampshire's character leaving on a romantic rendezvous.
* NoNameGiven: In numerous episodes, Drake is referred to on screen only by whatever alias he is using, or often by no name at all; anyone unfamiliar with the show only learns his name by watching the closing credits. (Note: this only applies to the one-hour version of the series; in the half-hour version, Drake states his name in the opening narration.)

to:

* MetaCasting: The last black and white episode "Not so Jolly Roger" guest-starred Patsy Ann Noble (later known as Trisha Noble), a popular singer just launching an acting career. Since the episode is set at a pirate radio station, it's not surprising that one of her songs is not only featured prominently, but Patsy Ann Noble gets a name-drop at the end of the episode as her song is introduced by John Drake while Noble is standing right next to him.
him, smiling.
* NoHuggingNoKissing: Drake does not get involved with women, period. He occasionally flirts with them, and they clearly find him attractive, but he is never shown romancing them. One episode, "The Black Book", has him attracted to a young woman, but he [[ItsNotYouItsMyEnemies explains why he cannot get involved.]] involved]], which echoes [=McGoohan's=] attitude regarding why Drake has to remain chaste. The closest Drake comes is in two episodes guest starring Susan Hampshire (playing different, but similar characters in each), one of which ends with Drake and Hampshire's character leaving on for a romantic rendezvous.
* NoNameGiven: In numerous episodes, Drake is referred to on screen only by whatever alias he is using, or often by no name at all; all, or [[OnlyOneName only by his surname]]; anyone unfamiliar with the show only learns his full name by watching the closing credits. (Note: this only applies to the one-hour version of the series; in the half-hour version, Drake states his name in the opening narration.narration of each episode.)



* [[TheNameIsBondJamesBond The Name Is Drake, John Drake]]: predating the Bond movies, but not the books. Generally heard only in the opening of the first season (half-hour episodes), but occasionally thereafter.
* ThouShaltNotKill: To an extent. Most episodes of the series did not involve Drake using deadly force, and an early episode in fact featured him being assigned an assassination and doing so only under protest (and he doesn't carry it out anyway). During the entire run of the series, Drake shoots a man only once (not counting a later episode where he shoots people in a dream/hallucination), and otherwise rarely carries a gun. That's not to say he won't avert the trope if necessary, including one episode where he [[spoiler: kills two villains, one a woman, by causing their plane to crash]].

to:

* [[TheNameIsBondJamesBond The Name Is Drake, John Drake]]: predating the Bond movies, but not the books. Generally heard only in the opening of the first 1960-61 season (half-hour episodes), but occasionally thereafter.
* ThouShaltNotKill: To an extent. Most episodes of the series did not involve Drake using deadly force, and an early episode in fact featured him being assigned an assassination and doing so accepting the mission only under protest (and he doesn't carry it out anyway). During the entire run of the series, Drake shoots a man only once (not counting a later episode where he shoots people in a dream/hallucination), and otherwise rarely carries a gun. That's not to say he won't avert the trope if necessary, including one episode where he [[spoiler: kills two villains, one a woman, by causing their plane to crash]].



* WouldHitAGirl: Averted only once in an episode where [[spoiler: Drake is forced to kill a female villain and her cohort by causing their plane to crash.]] Most other times, female characters in the series are either innocents, victims, or are apprehended peacefully.

to:

* WouldHitAGirl: Averted only once in an episode where [[spoiler: Drake is forced to kill a female villain and her cohort by causing their plane to crash.]] Most other times, female characters in the series are either innocents, victims, or are apprehended peacefully.peacefully and Drake is never shown manhandling females.

Added DiffLines:

* {{Foreshadowing}}: In a meta sense. The US version's opening credits, using the song "Secret Agent Man", ends with the following lyric: "They've given you a number/and taken away your name", describing the set-up for ''Series/ThePrisoner1967''.


* BuccaneerBroadcaster: In "Not So Jolly Roger", Drake poses as a DJ at a pirate radio station on a WorldWarII vintage offshore anti-aircraft fort, whose broadcast activities are the cover for anti-British espionage. Some location footage was actually shot on and around a real fort that was being used by Radio 390[[note]]1965-7; broadcasting on 773kHz AM, or approximtely 390 metres[[/note]], including a shot of [=McGoohan=] being winched up to one of the fort's towers. Other scenes were mocked up in the studio using location photos as backdrops.

to:

* BuccaneerBroadcaster: In "Not So Jolly Roger", Drake poses as a DJ at a pirate radio station on a WorldWarII UsefulNotes/WorldWarII vintage offshore anti-aircraft fort, whose broadcast activities are the cover for anti-British espionage. Some location footage was actually shot on and around a real fort that was being used by Radio 390[[note]]1965-7; broadcasting on 773kHz AM, or approximtely 390 metres[[/note]], including a shot of [=McGoohan=] being winched up to one of the fort's towers. Other scenes were mocked up in the studio using location photos as backdrops.


* BuccaneerBroadcaster: In "Not So Jolly Roger", Drake poses as a DJ at a pirate radio station on a WorldWarII vintage offshore anti-aircraft fort, whose broadcast activities are the cover for anti-British espionage. Some location footage was actually shot on and around a real fort that was being used by Radio 390[[note]]1965-7; broadcasting on 773kHz AM, or approximtely 390 metres[[/note]], including one of [=McGoohan=] being winched up to one of the fort's towers. Other scenes were mocked up in the studio using location photos as backdrops.

to:

* BuccaneerBroadcaster: In "Not So Jolly Roger", Drake poses as a DJ at a pirate radio station on a WorldWarII vintage offshore anti-aircraft fort, whose broadcast activities are the cover for anti-British espionage. Some location footage was actually shot on and around a real fort that was being used by Radio 390[[note]]1965-7; broadcasting on 773kHz AM, or approximtely 390 metres[[/note]], including one a shot of [=McGoohan=] being winched up to one of the fort's towers. Other scenes were mocked up in the studio using location photos as backdrops.


Added DiffLines:

* StockFootage: A standard ITC technique. Exotic locations were introduced by stock [[EstablishingShot establishing shots]], then faked in the studio or on location in England.

Added DiffLines:

* BuccaneerBroadcaster: In "Not So Jolly Roger", Drake poses as a DJ at a pirate radio station on a WorldWarII vintage offshore anti-aircraft fort, whose broadcast activities are the cover for anti-British espionage. Some location footage was actually shot on and around a real fort that was being used by Radio 390[[note]]1965-7; broadcasting on 773kHz AM, or approximtely 390 metres[[/note]], including one of [=McGoohan=] being winched up to one of the fort's towers. Other scenes were mocked up in the studio using location photos as backdrops.


* [[CaliforniaDoubling Wales Doubling]]


* ScrewTheRulesImDoingWhatsRight: Drake, not infrequently takes on this trope when the higher-ups are indifferent towards the fate of someone on their own side, would rather kill to be safe rather than sorry, or don't care about what the casualties will be.

to:

* ScrewTheRulesImDoingWhatsRight: Drake, not infrequently Drake frequently takes on this trope when the higher-ups are indifferent towards the fate of someone on their own side, would rather kill to be safe rather than sorry, or don't care about what the casualties will be.


[[caption-width-right:200: They've given him a number. [[Series/ThePrisoner He will be angry later on.]]]]

to:

[[caption-width-right:200: They've given him a number. [[Series/ThePrisoner [[Series/ThePrisoner1967 He will be angry later on.]]]]


* TheCharmer: Drake has a switch for it, and when he turns it on, just about anyone who's not GenreSavvy melts before his charming smile and suave, witty banter (which is to say it works on ordinary people or the newbie to the spy game).

to:

* TheCharmer: Drake has a switch for it, and when he turns it on, just about anyone who's not GenreSavvy melts before his charming smile and suave, witty banter (which is to say it works on ordinary people or the newbie to the spy game).


* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: John Drake doesn't carry a gun and he ''never'' shoots anyone to death (we don't count a [[spoiler: dream sequence/hallucination]] episode). The only exception was in one of the early 1960-61 series episodes. He used deadly force on rare occasion thereafter and trained guns on people to make them surrender, to be sure, but he never put a bullet into another (real) person.

to:

* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: John Drake doesn't carry a gun and he ''never'' shoots anyone to death (we don't count a [[spoiler: dream sequence/hallucination]] episode). The only exception was in one of the early 1960-61 series episodes. He used deadly force on rare occasion thereafter and trained guns on people to make them surrender, to be sure, but he never put a bullet into another (real) person. Qualifies for this trope as ''Danger Man's'' lack of gunplay set it apart from other spy shows of the era.


* DownerEnding: Regularly, especially in the third season.

to:

* DownerEnding: Regularly, especially in the third season. Drake doesn't always win a clear victory and even if he does, there are rarely any "high five" moments.
* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: John Drake doesn't carry a gun and he ''never'' shoots anyone to death (we don't count a [[spoiler: dream sequence/hallucination]] episode). The only exception was in one of the early 1960-61 series episodes. He used deadly force on rare occasion thereafter and trained guns on people to make them surrender, to be sure, but he never put a bullet into another (real) person.


* DarkerAndEdgier: The first season was hardly a happyfest, but the second was way more depressing.

to:

* DarkerAndEdgier: The first season was two seasons were hardly a happyfest, happyfests, but the second third was way more depressing.



* DownerEnding: Regularly.

to:

* DownerEnding: Regularly.Regularly, especially in the third season.



* NoHuggingNoKissing: Drake does not get involved with women, period. He flirts with them, and they clearly find him attractive, but he is never shown romancing them. One episode, "The Black Book", has him attracted to a young woman, but he [[ItsNotYouItsMyEnemies explains why he cannot get involved.]] The closest Drake comes is in two episodes guest starring Susan Hampshire (playing different, but similar characters in each), one of which ends with Drake and Hampshire's character leaving on a romantic rendezvous.

to:

* NoHuggingNoKissing: Drake does not get involved with women, period. He occasionally flirts with them, and they clearly find him attractive, but he is never shown romancing them. One episode, "The Black Book", has him attracted to a young woman, but he [[ItsNotYouItsMyEnemies explains why he cannot get involved.]] The closest Drake comes is in two episodes guest starring Susan Hampshire (playing different, but similar characters in each), one of which ends with Drake and Hampshire's character leaving on a romantic rendezvous.


* RetCon: Drake becomes a British agent in the later seasons, after having been an Irish-American NATO agent in the first.

to:

* RetCon: Drake becomes a British agent in the later seasons, after having been an Irish-American NATO agent in the first. (Although it's possible this isn't -- see ActorSharedBackground.)


Not to be confused with ''Series/SecretAgentMan'', a short-lived spy show that aired on UPN in 2000 that used the same theme song as the US version of ''Secret Agent'' but otherwise had no connection to the [=McGoohan=] series. (Some reference books and websites erroneously label it a remake.)

to:

Not to be confused with ''Series/SecretAgentMan'', ''Secret Agent Man'', a short-lived spy show that aired on UPN in 2000 that used the same theme song as the US version of ''Secret Agent'' but otherwise had no connection to the [=McGoohan=] series. (Some reference books and websites erroneously label it a remake.)


* ValuesResonance: "The Galloping Major", which is about an emerging democracy in Africa. (Describing it as FairForItsDay would be damning it with faint praise.)

Showing 15 edit(s) of 93

Top

Example of:

/
/

Feedback