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* ArtisticLicenseEngineering: While the book portrays realistically the lack of InertialDampening during the take-off, the method chosen by the rocket designers to cushion its anatomical effects on the crew is not the most efficient one, but rather the ''least''. By having the crewmembers laying on their stomach instead of sitting faceup as it is done in real life rockets, they are allowing the acceleration to effectively squeeze their lungs flat between the floor and their own bodies. The outcome shown in the take-off is accurate: everybody being painfully smothered until passing out is pretty much what they would have got in real life.
** Not so much of ArtisticLicense as of ScienceMarchesOn, since it was considered an [[https://www.lostateminor.com/2013/02/18/prone-position-pilot-bed-from-1949-by-u-s-air-forces-air-laboratory/ actual method]] back in late 1940s.


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* ScienceMarchesOn: While the book portrays realistically the lack of InertialDampening during the take-off, the method chosen by the rocket designers to cushion its anatomical effects on the crew is to have them lay on their stomachs, which was considered an [[https://www.lostateminor.com/2013/02/18/prone-position-pilot-bed-from-1949-by-u-s-air-forces-air-laboratory/ actual method]] back in late 1940s. We now know that such a method is the ''last'' thing you want to do to prepare for take off, as you are allowing the acceleration to effectively squeeze your lungs flat between the floor and your own body. The outcome shown in the take-off is accurate: everybody being painfully smothered until passing out is pretty much what they would have got in real life.


* ArtisticLicenseMilitary: The Syldavian government allows two civilians with no formal training in space flight and a ''dog'' to be "invited" to take part in the biggest and riskiest attempt at manned space flight ever devised. This wouldn't have been out of place had the story been set in the Victorian times a la ''Literature/FromTheEarthToTheMoon'', when the ideal of the GentlemanAdventurer meant many expeditions were privately organized by bored rich men and thus it was usual to see unqualified people in perilous adventures only because they had connections. By the time this story is set in, however, this mentality had been completely phased out and replaced by a more professional approach similar to our modern NASA. But then again, how else were you going to get Tintin and his friends on-board?
** Admittedly, Tintin and Haddock aren't ''that'' unqualified despite being civilians; both have [[Recap/TintinTheShootingStar previous experience being part of a successful scientific expedition]], and the book makes it quite clear they weren't so much "invited" as much as they were recommanded by Calculus for being competent and brave.

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* ArtisticLicenseMilitary: The Syldavian government allows two civilians with no formal training in space flight and a ''dog'' to be "invited" to take part in the biggest and riskiest attempt at manned space flight ever devised. This wouldn't have been out of place had the story been set in the Victorian times a la ''Literature/FromTheEarthToTheMoon'', when the ideal of the GentlemanAdventurer meant many expeditions were privately organized by bored rich men and thus it was usual to see unqualified people in perilous adventures only because they had connections. By the time this story is set in, however, this mentality had been completely phased out and replaced by a more professional approach similar to our modern NASA. But then again, how else were you going to get Tintin and his friends on-board?
** Admittedly,
on-board? [[note]]Admittedly, Tintin and Haddock aren't ''that'' unqualified despite being civilians; both have [[Recap/TintinTheShootingStar previous experience being part of a successful scientific expedition]], and the book makes it quite clear they weren't so much "invited" as much as they were recommanded by Calculus for being competent and brave.[[/note]]


* InsultedAwake: Captain Haddock cures Professor Calculus' accidental amnesia by complaining about "acting the goat", a remark that had earlier served as a BerserkButton for Calculus.

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* InsultedAwake: Captain Haddock cures Professor Calculus' accidental amnesia by complaining about "acting the goat", a remark that had earlier served as a BerserkButton for Calculus. This is completely by accident because this time Haddock is not even calling Calculus a goat, but ''himself'' for dressing as a ghost.

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** Not so much of ArtisticLicense as of ScienceMarchesOn, since it was considered an [[https://www.lostateminor.com/2013/02/18/prone-position-pilot-bed-from-1949-by-u-s-air-forces-air-laboratory/ actual method]] back in late 1940s.

Added DiffLines:

** Admittedly, Tintin and Haddock aren't ''that'' unqualified despite being civilians; both have [[Recap/TintinTheShootingStar previous experience being part of a successful scientific expedition]], and the book makes it quite clear they weren't so much "invited" as much as they were recommanded by Calculus for being competent and brave.


* BehindTheBlack: The scene described on the book cover happens a bit differently in the comic: the pictures are only focused on the jeep, carefully excluding the Moon rocket from the frame until the jeep stops at its foot (and at the bottom of a page), leaving Tintin and Haddock looking up in surprise, leaving the reveal of the rocket in its full glory for the heroes and the readers for the next page. In short, it seems as if Calculus drove all the way to the Moon rocket without either Tintin or Haddock apparently noticing it before they are parked almost below it.

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* BehindTheBlack: The scene described on the book cover happens a bit differently in the comic: the pictures are only focused on the jeep, carefully excluding the Moon rocket from the frame until the jeep stops at its foot (and at the bottom of a page), leaving with Tintin and Haddock looking up in surprise, leaving the reveal of the rocket in its full glory for the heroes and the readers for the next page. In short, it seems as if Calculus drove all the way to the Moon rocket without either Tintin or Haddock apparently noticing it before they are parked almost below it.

Added DiffLines:

* BehindTheBlack: The scene described on the book cover happens a bit differently in the comic: the pictures are only focused on the jeep, carefully excluding the Moon rocket from the frame until the jeep stops at its foot (and at the bottom of a page), leaving Tintin and Haddock looking up in surprise, leaving the reveal of the rocket in its full glory for the heroes and the readers for the next page. In short, it seems as if Calculus drove all the way to the Moon rocket without either Tintin or Haddock apparently noticing it before they are parked almost below it.


* CassandraTruth: It's easy to miss, but the Thom(p)sons display an unusual bout of competence in this story by successfully [[spoiler:capturing the Mole, who had managed to get the drop on Haddock]]. Of course, everybody, including them, thinks it's another of their stupid mistakes when they realise [[spoiler:the person they captured is Calculus' assistant]].

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* CassandraTruth: It's easy to miss, but the Thom(p)sons display an unusual bout of competence in this story by successfully [[spoiler:capturing the Mole, who had managed to get the drop on Haddock]]. Of course, everybody, including them, thinks it's another of their stupid mistakes when they realise [[spoiler:the person they captured is Calculus' assistant]]. Also counts as a RewatchBonus because one realises this only after reading [[Recap/TintinExplorersOnTheMoon the sequel]] (where nobody comments on this).

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* CassandraTruth: It's easy to miss, but the Thom(p)sons display an unusual bout of competence in this story by successfully [[spoiler:capturing the Mole, who had managed to get the drop on Haddock]]. Of course, everybody, including them, thinks it's another of their stupid mistakes when they realise [[spoiler:the person they captured is Calculus' assistant]].


* AscendedExtra: [[spoiler:We didn't know about Jorgen's involvement with the villains and Wolff until the next book. In the Nelvana animated series, we get a new scene showing how they met.]]


* {{Ruritania}}: Syldavia. Previously featured in ''[[Recap/TintinKingOttokarsSceptre King Ottokar's Sceptre]]'' (1939), Syldavia is an atypically detailed version of this trope. It has its own flag, royal dynasty, historical events and even a language created by Hergé. The made-up language, despite being written in Cyrillic script, was remarkably not Slavic but a dialect of Flemish/Dutch with some curious phonetics. In this album Syldavia becomes the setting for a fictionalized space program.

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* {{Ruritania}}: Syldavia. Previously featured in ''[[Recap/TintinKingOttokarsSceptre King Ottokar's Sceptre]]'' (1939), Syldavia is an atypically detailed version of this trope. It has its own flag, royal dynasty, historical events and even a language created by Hergé. The made-up language, despite being written in Cyrillic script, was remarkably not Slavic but a dialect of Flemish/Dutch with some curious phonetics. In this album album, Syldavia becomes the setting for a fictionalized space program.


* AscendedExtra: [[spoiler:We didn't know about Jorgen's involvement with the villains and Wolfe until the next book. In the Nelvana animated series, we get a new scene showing how they met.]]

to:

* AscendedExtra: [[spoiler:We didn't know about Jorgen's involvement with the villains and Wolfe Wolff until the next book. In the Nelvana animated series, we get a new scene showing how they met.]]

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* AscendedExtra: [[spoiler:We didn't know about Jorgen's involvement with the villains and Wolfe until the next book. In the Nelvana animated series, we get a new scene showing how they met.]]

Added DiffLines:

* AbuseMistake: Just as the two heroes enter the office Calculus is in, there is a man with a hammer about to crush his head, leading them to think he was in danger. But it turns out he was testing the helmet on his head.

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* ArtisticLicenseEngineering: While the book portrays realistically the lack of InertialDampening during the take-off, the method chosen by the rocket designers to cushion its anatomical effects on the crew is not the most efficient one, but rather the ''least''. By having the crewmembers laying on their stomach instead of sitting faceup as it is done in real life rockets, they are allowing the acceleration to effectively squeeze their lungs flat between the floor and their own bodies. The outcome shown in the take-off is accurate: everybody being painfully smothered until passing out is pretty much what they would have got in real life.

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