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History Recap / TheSimpsonsS4E2AStreetcarNamedMarge

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* BadBoss: By his own admission, Llewelyn's not easy to work for, often driving cast members (including ''children'') to tears.



* JerkWithAHeartOfGold: Despite the above, by the end of the play, when Marge sees what she is convinced is an utterly bored uncaring expression, Homer has in fact been left rather solemn and touched by the play's story, even seeing himself in Stanley.

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* JerkWithAHeartOfGold: JerkWithAHeartOfGold:
**
Despite the above, by the end of the play, when Marge sees what she is convinced is an utterly bored uncaring expression, Homer has in fact been left rather solemn and touched by the play's story, even seeing himself in Stanley.Stanley.
** Llewelyn Sinclair, with a slight more emphasis on the {{Jerkass}}. He belittles everyone about everything, is quite demanding and somewhat of a perfectionist elitist when it comes to his work, and he even fires one of his play's cast-members (Otto) on the night of the performance, but he is passionate about his work, can see talent when it truly presents itself, does his best to draw out the best of his actors, and even if a bit vain, adores the audience, feeling they help make the production as it is as well. It's just that he's not without his flaws, like most of ''The Simpsons'' cast.



* PrimaDonnaDirector: Llewelyn Sinclair.

to:

* PrimaDonnaDirector: Llewelyn Sinclair.Sinclair actually winds up on stage when he takes over Otto's role right before the performance, having realized Otto wasn't good enough.



* SmallNameBigEgo: Llwellyn carries around a good review he got for directing a ''fourth-grade play''.
-->'''Llewellyn Sinclair:''' Did I expect ''too much'' from fourth graders? The review "play enjoyed by ''all''"... speaks for itself!



* StylisticSuck: Similar to the later ''Film/PlanetOfTheApes'' musical, though the overall production is surprisingly competent, the idea of a lighthearted musical based on ''A Streetcar Named Desire'' is played for all the mileage it's worth. It tops off with "I have always depended on the kindness of strangers" (in its original context, a reflection on how Blanche's mind has been completely broken and how she has deluded herself into thinking [[RapeLeadsToInsanity her prior trauma]] at the hands of Stanley was actually kindness) being converted into a jaunty, completely unironic end number about how "A stranger is a friend you haven't met!"

to:

* StylisticSuck: Similar to the later ''Film/PlanetOfTheApes'' ''Film/PlanetOfTheApes1968'' musical, though the overall production is surprisingly competent, the idea of a lighthearted musical based on ''A Streetcar Named Desire'' is played for all the mileage it's worth. It tops off with "I have always depended on the kindness of strangers" (in its original context, a reflection on how Blanche's mind has been completely broken and how she has deluded herself into thinking [[RapeLeadsToInsanity her prior trauma]] at the hands of Stanley was actually kindness) being converted into a jaunty, completely unironic end number about how "A stranger is a friend you haven't met!"


* WholePlotReference: [[CaptainObvious To]] ''Theatre/AStreetcarNamedDesire''.

to:

* WholePlotReference: [[CaptainObvious To]] To ''Theatre/AStreetcarNamedDesire''.


*** In fairness to 'The Simpsons,' the opening song is needed because the original play does take place in New Orleans.

to:

*** In fairness to 'The Simpsons,' ''The Simpsons'', the opening song is needed because the original play does take place in New Orleans.



* WholePlotReference: [[CaptainObvious To]] ''Theatre/AStreetcarNamedDesire''.

to:

* VengefulVendingMachine: A FunnyBackgroundEvent has Homer beating the crap out of an uncooperative vending machine.
* WholePlotReference: [[CaptainObvious To]] ''Theatre/AStreetcarNamedDesire''.''Theatre/AStreetcarNamedDesire''.
----


* IsntItIronic:
** The final song of ''Oh, Streetcar!'' is a bright, peppy tune about how you should always trust strangers, making a mess of the original play's point.
** Earlier in the episode, a beauty pageant on TV begins with the contestants singing "At Seventeen" ("I learned the truth at seventeen/that love was meant for beauty queens"), completely oblivious to what the song is actually about (which is about a plain girl singing about how the pretty girls in school had it so much better than her, but now their lives were worse).



* IsntItIronic:
** The final song of ''Oh, Streetcar!'' is a bright, peppy tune about how you should always trust strangers, making a mess of the original play's point.
** Earlier in the episode, a beauty pageant on TV begins with the contestants singing "At Seventeen" ("I learned the truth at seventeen/that love was meant for beauty queens"), completely oblivious to what the song is actually about (which is about a plain girl singing about how the pretty girls in school had it so much better than her, but now their lives were worse).


* ComicallyMissingThePoint:
** The final song of ''Oh, Streetcar!'' is a bright, peppy tune about how you should always trust strangers, making a mess of the original play's point.
** Earlier in the episode, a beauty pageant on TV begins with the contestants singing "At Seventeen" ("I learned the truth at seventeen/that love was meant for beauty queens"), completely oblivious to what the song is actually about (which is about a plain girl singing about how the pretty girls in school had it so much better than her, but now their lives were worse).
** Lampshaded and subverted. Homer tells Marge how he interpreted the play before admitting he has a history of missing the point of things. Marge tells him he got it right, though.

to:

* ComicallyMissingThePoint:
** The final song of ''Oh, Streetcar!'' is a bright, peppy tune about how you should always trust strangers, making a mess of the original play's point.
** Earlier in the episode, a beauty pageant on TV begins with the contestants singing "At Seventeen" ("I learned the truth at seventeen/that love was meant for beauty queens"), completely oblivious to what the song is actually about (which is about a plain girl singing about how the pretty girls in school had it so much better than her, but now their lives were worse).
**
ComicallyMissingThePoint: Lampshaded and subverted. Homer tells Marge how he interpreted the play before admitting he has a history of missing the point of things. Marge tells him he got it right, though.


Added DiffLines:

* IsntItIronic:
** The final song of ''Oh, Streetcar!'' is a bright, peppy tune about how you should always trust strangers, making a mess of the original play's point.
** Earlier in the episode, a beauty pageant on TV begins with the contestants singing "At Seventeen" ("I learned the truth at seventeen/that love was meant for beauty queens"), completely oblivious to what the song is actually about (which is about a plain girl singing about how the pretty girls in school had it so much better than her, but now their lives were worse).


* ProductPlacement[=/=]BrandX: While Homer plays what is clearly an original GameBoy, the device's name is never said or seen.

to:

* ProductPlacement[=/=]BrandX: ProductPlacement: While Homer plays what is clearly an original GameBoy, UsefulNotes/GameBoy, the device's name is never said or seen.

Added DiffLines:

* MissionImpossibleCableDrop: Maggie does this in her attempt to get the keys to the pacifier locker, using a Krusty doll pull string as the wire and milk bottles as weights.

Added DiffLines:

* StylisticSuck: Similar to the later ''Film/PlanetOfTheApes'' musical, though the overall production is surprisingly competent, the idea of a lighthearted musical based on ''A Streetcar Named Desire'' is played for all the mileage it's worth. It tops off with "I have always depended on the kindness of strangers" (in its original context, a reflection on how Blanche's mind has been completely broken and how she has deluded herself into thinking [[RapeLeadsToInsanity her prior trauma]] at the hands of Stanley was actually kindness) being converted into a jaunty, completely unironic end number about how "A stranger is a friend you haven't met!"


* MeanCharacterNiceActor: Ned Flanders plays Stanley Kowalski, due entirely to his impressive physique.

to:

* MeanCharacterNiceActor: Ned Flanders plays Stanley Kowalski, due entirely to his [[MrFanservice impressive physique.physique]].

Added DiffLines:

* DieHardOnAnX: Maggie's subplot plays out like ''Die Hard in a nursery''.


** The bandage is likely a prop worn by Ned.

Added DiffLines:

** The musical's song about New Orleans is a parody of "No Place Like London" from ''Theatre/SweeneyToddTheDemonBarberOfFleetStreet''.


** The bandage is likely a prop worn by Ned.



* ExtremeDoormat: There's a good glimpse into Marge's worldview when she's trying to play Blanche. She suggests that, rather than try and stab Stanley, she "just take his abuse with gentle good humour".

to:

* ExtremeDoormat: There's a good glimpse into Marge's worldview when she's trying to play Blanche. She suggests that, rather than try and stab Stanley, she "just take his abuse with gentle good humour".humor".


Added DiffLines:

*** In fairness to 'The Simpsons,' the opening song is needed because the original play does take place in New Orleans.


* TemptingFate: As Marge leaves to go rehearse with Ned, Homer asks she open his pudding can for her. Marge tells him to do it himself, but the minute she's gone Homer breaks the can.

to:

* TemptingFate: As Marge leaves to go rehearse with Ned, Homer asks she her to open his pudding can for her.can. Marge tells him to do it himself, but the minute she's gone Homer breaks the can.

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