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** The early episodes are also much shorter than the runtimes fans would come to know, clocking in at just over 10 minutes apiece. ''The History of Rome'' and his sequel podcast, ''Podcast/{{Revolutions}}, would settle in at around 25-30 minutes per episode, with the occasional epic length episode thrown in for good measure.

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** The early episodes are also much shorter than the runtimes fans would come to know, clocking in at just over 10 minutes apiece. ''The History of Rome'' and his sequel podcast, ''Podcast/{{Revolutions}}, ''Podcast/{{Revolutions}}'', would settle in at around 25-30 minutes per episode, with the occasional epic length episode thrown in for good measure.

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** The early episodes are also much shorter than the runtimes fans would come to know, clocking in at just over 10 minutes apiece. ''The History of Rome'' and his sequel podcast, ''Podcast/{{Revolutions}}, would settle in at around 25-30 minutes per episode, with the occasional epic length episode thrown in for good measure.

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* SpiritualSuccessor: ''The History of Byzantium'', narrated by Robin Pierson, which [[ImmediateSequel almost literally]] picks up where ''Rome'' leaves off to carry forward the story of the surviving eastern half of the empire (a.k.a. the UsefulNotes/ByzantineEmpire). Duncan himself makes a guest appearance on ''Byzantium'' for an interview and Q&A session.

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* KlingonPromotion: Happened a lot during the last centuries of the Roman Empire, with the assassination of Caracalla in 217 kicking off a long series of these.


* ICouldaBeenAContender:[[invoked]] Duncan feels this way about some Emperors who died before they could fulfill their potential. He especially cites Aurelian, calling his death by assassination an incident "I still get angry about". While he's more skeptical about Julian the Apostate, he also feels that his ideas were so ambitious that historians "are never gonna stop discussing [[WhatCouldHaveBeen what might have]] been had he [lived longer]"

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* ICouldaBeenAContender:[[invoked]] Duncan feels this way about some Emperors who died before they could fulfill their potential. He especially cites Aurelian, calling his death by assassination an incident "I still get angry about". While he's more skeptical about Julian the Apostate, he also feels that his ideas were so ambitious that historians "are never gonna stop discussing [[WhatCouldHaveBeen what might have]] been had he [lived longer]"lived longer"


* TheGhost: Duncan's girlfriend, later fiancée, and then wife, known as "Mrs. ''The History of Rome''" after they got married in 2010. She finally does appear on the 100th Episode however.

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* TheGhost: Duncan's girlfriend, later fiancée, and then wife, known as "Mrs. ''The History of Rome''" after they got married in 2010. She finally does appear appeared on the 100th Episode however. episode in a two-second cameo.

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* ButtMonkey: Poor Claudius could not catch a break, between being widely mocked for a speech impediment, being bullied by Caligula, one engagement being broken off for political reasons, his first wife dying on their wedding day, his fourth wife openly marrying another man while still married to him, and his final wife (probably) having him assassinated to make way for Nero. A shame as Duncan considers Claudius to probably have been in the top ten greatest Roman emperors.


* WeddingDay: One of the breathers, covering Roman wedding customs and the marital lives of Romans over the centuries. This one was [[RealLifeWritesThePlot precipitated by his own marriage]] to "Mrs. ''The History of Rome''."

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* WeddingDay: WeddingEpisode: Variation. One of the breathers, covering breathers covers Roman wedding customs and the marital lives of Romans over the centuries. This one was [[RealLifeWritesThePlot precipitated by his own marriage]] to "Mrs. ''The History of Rome''."

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** Also notable when describing the assassination of Pertinax and the auctioning of the Empire to Didius Julianus.

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* BlackComedy: Indulges in a bit of this at times. Particularly notable when discussing Valentinian's death from a stroke he worked himself into during a furious rant. He even refers to it as the "[[BlatantLies very serious and not at all hilarious death of Valentinian.]]"

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* SequelEscalation: Duncan [[DiscussedTrope humorously compares]] the career of Gaius Gracchus compared to his brother to this trope
* ShortLivedBigImpact: Discussed, leading to Duncan comparing Aurelian to the concept of career vs. peak value in baseball to get the point across.


* RunningGag: Whenever something amusing or unexpected occurs, Duncan is liable to say, "then a funny thing happened" (a ShoutOut to ''Theatre/AFunnyThingHappenedOnTheWayToTheForum'').

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* RunningGag: Whenever something amusing or unexpected occurs, Duncan is liable to say, "then a funny thing happened" (a ShoutOut to ''Theatre/AFunnyThingHappenedOnTheWayToTheForum'').''Theatre/AFunnyThingHappenedOnTheWayToTheForum''.
** Deaths that happened under mysterious circumstances are almost always blamed on Livia, no matter how many centuries after her own death they occurred.


** When describing a battle against enemy war elephants, Duncan notes that the Roman strategy--have charioteers trip the elephants by winding wires around their legs--had previously proven effective [[Film/TheEmpireStrikesBack against the Imperial Walkers at the Battle of Hoth.]] [[CrowningMomentOfFunny Without once breaking his deadpan.]]

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** When describing a battle against enemy war elephants, Duncan notes that the Roman strategy--have charioteers trip the elephants by winding wires around their legs--had previously proven effective [[Film/TheEmpireStrikesBack against the Imperial Walkers at the Battle of Hoth.]] [[CrowningMomentOfFunny [[SugarWiki/FunnyMoments Without once breaking his deadpan.]]

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** When describing a battle against enemy war elephants, Duncan notes that the Roman strategy--have charioteers trip the elephants by winding wires around their legs--had previously proven effective [[Film/TheEmpireStrikesBack against the Imperial Walkers at the Battle of Hoth.]] [[CrowningMomentOfFunny Without once breaking his deadpan.]]


'''''The History of Rome''''' ("[=THoR=]" to its friends, 2007-2012), is a podcast by Creator/MikeDuncan. As you might expect, it covers [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin the history of]] UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire from the founding of Rome to the death of the last Western Emperor in 476. It achieved massive acclaim and (for a podcast) popularity in large part because of three factors: (1) Mike Duncan's incredibly detailed and accurate research, (2) Duncan's amazing ability to relate the story not only well, but in a way that made things ''interesting'', and (3) the fact that episodes are generally about 30 minutes--long enough to be engrossing, but short enough that they hold your attention. It's perhaps no wonder it was voted the best educational podcast of 2010.

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'''''The '''''[[http://thehistoryofrome.com/episodes/ The History of Rome''''' Rome]]''''' ("[=THoR=]" to its friends, 2007-2012), is a podcast by Creator/MikeDuncan. As you might expect, it covers [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin the history of]] UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire from the founding of Rome to the death of the last Western Emperor in 476. It achieved massive acclaim and (for a podcast) popularity in large part because of three factors: (1) Mike Duncan's incredibly detailed and accurate research, (2) Duncan's amazing ability to relate the story not only well, but in a way that made things ''interesting'', and (3) the fact that episodes are generally about 30 minutes--long enough to be engrossing, but short enough that they hold your attention. It's perhaps no wonder it was voted the best educational podcast of 2010.

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